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Thread: Traced portrait

  1. #1
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    Traced portrait

    For those who saw my painted version, this one was executed using the tracing function - picking up the tracing colours. I like the effect but feel it is not a painting - fun to do and perhaps learn tonal qualities but I don't think I could claim it as a painting. I actually like the result and think it is nearer to the photo than my painted version - the eyes are much better.

    What are the opinions of members here of this type of painting using the colours from the tracing image?

    Name:  karlytracedth.png
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  2. #2
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    I really like where you've taken this. Very nice portrait. I think the mouth got more subtle, which is good. I personally might do a little creative design the back of her hair. It's a little less appealing as a shape than the picture warrants. It may be the way it looks in the photo, but you're allowed to make improvements. And as an artist, the hair is one of those areas where you have some extra license to change it some. I think what is bothering me about it is the amount of sharp and consistent contrast you have there and it's distracting the attention to a comparatively insignificant part of the head. The eye goes to the area of most contrast and I think you probably want to be directing the viewers' eye to other parts of the girl. You can soften the edge in places and make the edge lost and found, you can vary the shapes differently, you can bring the color and value of the background around it to be much closer.

    Overall the eyes look way better. The eye on our right it down right brilliant.

    It's already a brilliant painting and you are looking very carefully and getting it closer and closer to the photo.
    Last edited by D Akey; 04-20-2014 at 07:04 PM.
    "Not a bit is wasted and the best is yet to come. . ." -- remembered from a dream

  3. #3
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    Thank so much D Akey - I hadn't realised about the hair until you drew my attention to it. So much to learn. I think the hair looks better now but not sure if I completely understood - I blurred the edge so it looked softer and smoothed the hair so it seems to be a heavier fall and blended in the lights and darks.

    Name:  karlyhairth.png
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    Last edited by Enug; 04-21-2014 at 01:50 AM.

  4. #4
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    Yeah, I think it's a good choice to simplify. And you brought the values closer. As to other suggestions I was saying, as to the 'why' of it, a general rule when creating a picture, you are creating a visual hierarchy, meaning as the creator of the image you are leading the viewer's eye on a journey. And by hierarchy I mean that the eye lands in the picture at the most dominant, important place. That is usually the place in the picture with the most contrast (where light meets dark, where colors knock together in a contrasty way, thus the most active area.)

    The human eye, because of the way we're wired, notices change first. It's one of the things that has kept us alive during our evolution. By noticing contrast in the real world, we're able to better equipped to notice predators and enemies, and generally irregularities in patterns. This can be exploited by artists, and so we can draw the viewer's attention to certain parts of the composition. And in the case of portraits and other images we have a subjective response to, our mind tends to want to look at the eyes, the mouth and so on first -- the same way we would look at a person we see for the first time in real life. And we can either give that easily to the viewer, or is we have part of the picture competing with that, it creates a bit of a jarring pull away from that.

    Each picture we do is a journey for the eye. It can be simple and fast graphic of a dot on a blank background in which there's not a lot to the journey, or we have very complex images in which the viewer can wander around and find delightful details. And it's in those kinds of images, when it's a straight ahead painting, that we like to craft where the eye goes.

    So in the case of the back of the hair, it's important to not have it try to upstage the face. And this is one of the reasons that what happens sometimes is that in changing one detail it can affect several other things and the artist then feels the need to adjust other parts (speaking generally here). And you can go nuts changing this and that and the other thing. And sometimes that's a good idea and sometimes it's not that important. Always a subjective matter.

    Anyway, your solution is good. And the information on the back of the hair is all there but because it's now more simplified though still pleasant, it's not competing with the 'star of the show'.

    Hope that makes sense. At any rate it was what I was getting at.

    And I think it improved the image, what you did. Well done! I just had a visit with my grandsons. Got to see one of them for the first time. I really understand the desire for perfection because the feelings we have for them is just so wonderful it's beyond words. And this painting will show her your special feelings. I'm sure she'll love it and treasure it forever. Brava!
    "Not a bit is wasted and the best is yet to come. . ." -- remembered from a dream

  5. #5
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    Wow! What a lot of wonderful information in your reply. What's your address - I want lessons! As you can see I'm a raw beginner and a very late starter - my only artistic ambition is to have fun and turn out something that pleases me and hopefully to improve a little along the way.

    And I love the sentiment in your last paragraph - granddkids are special - I sometimes feel it would have been nice to have skipped the kids (stress and worry) and gone straight to granddkids.

  6. #6
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    Shes a beauty as is your portrait, well done
    Sometimes...I remember better with my eyes closed

    My Gallery
    http://members.artrage.com/vb_users/6307

  7. #7
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    Thank you - I received a lot of help suggestions to reach this point.

  8. #8
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    Fabulous work. Don't you just love art!

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  9. #9
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    Thank you.

    Quote Originally Posted by Victor Osaka View Post
    Don't you just love art!
    Yes, and all who are so generous in their sharing.

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