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Thread: Woo Sheep go to the City

  1. #1
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    Woo Sheep go to the City

    fraser's ( fraser paice ) woo sheep leave the country to go visit friends in a nearby city.....
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    Last edited by gxhpainter2; 09-25-2011 at 10:47 AM.

  2. #2
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    Yay! they are pesky critters hope they took a map.

  3. #3
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    Wow! Babe, the pig in the city has nothing on the Woo Sheep! WOO HOOOO!

    Hahaha. Dazzling. I must confess a preference for the work you do that fills the canvas like this. Personal preference only.

    Comparing it with some of your others, I'm not a huge fan of Klee and that sensibility, so I never studied what he was doing. I think I like things that are fuller and more . . . I don't know, complex and working color in a related way throughout a canvas.

    Like this one I really like. Certainly evokes a response from me. I feel like the Woo sheep have a buzz. and me too from it.

    Anyway, I like watching what you do in all cases and I may finally grok the Klee stuff as well. Granted they can dress up a wall in intriguing ways. And they imply a sort of esoteric artiness. But we don't have a room to see these in, so I go only based on the paintings.

    But I like these a lot. Keep 'em coming! Take us on a ride!
    "Not a bit is wasted and the best is yet to come. . ." -- remembered from a dream

  4. #4
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    /me faints

    woooo sheep! <3

  5. #5
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    masterful it makes me keep looking

  6. #6
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  7. #7
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    This an interesting piece to look at. The textures are especially interesting. Nicely done!

  8. #8
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    Gary that's a serious art piece. splendid stuff. Fun to explore.

  9. #9
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    Albert.... thanks for your comment that this is a serious art piece even though it was a wink and a nod at fraser's Woo Sheep..

    Bobbi and Sandy thanks for commenting... Sandy hope your sheep counting was a peaceful event

    Cartoonman - thanks I am most happy you found this an interesting piece.

    MSIE... steady girl.... the woo sheep will be safe..

    D Akey.. thanks for your elaboration on this work.... I am not sure I follow
    "Comparing it with some of your others, I'm not a huge fan of Klee and that sensibility," which of my works were you referring to...... but would like to know so I can go back and reevaluate them a bit...


    fraser thanks for your inspirational woo sheep....

  10. #10
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    D Akey.. thanks for your elaboration on this work.... I am not sure I follow
    "Comparing it with some of your others, I'm not a huge fan of Klee and that sensibility," which of my works were you referring to...... but would like to know so I can go back and reevaluate them a bit...


    ---------

    Thanks for the push to look at Klee closer. Was rather pleasant. And I can see where the confusion could come from about what I meant since his body of work covered a lot of ground, more than I first thought. Much of it fascinating and beautiful, thus saying "Klee" was imprecise. I meant certain of Klee's works only didn't work for me.

    And it is very important that you understand that my aesthetic sensibilities are cobbled together from what my life has brought me. Everybody's journey is different. So when I mention what I do, it's looking through my eyes.

    I have some difficulty getting into paintings that don't create a cohesive image. I include some of the work below as examples. I also include a Miro (top pic below) because it's what I'm talking about only more extremely so.

    When I look at a picture, I'm looking for qualities that create a relationship, whether through shapes or colors, design or subject. I need something to work as a handle for me to grab onto. The samples don't do that for me.

    Some abstract paintings like to do things in new ways that the viewer needs to be educated to or initiated into which suits me if it opens my eyes to something eventually. That overlays an intellectual, esoteric quality to the work, and it stimulates thoughts often beyond the picture. However one can ignore too many conventions to where it doesn't communicate enough leaving me scratching my head. Plus it doesn't appeal to me visually because it's not employing things that make a painting work visually, therefore it's not working enough to give it my attention.

    In fairness, Klee did employ a lot of those usual artist design things, and I like those pictures. But not in the pictures I am attaching because arguably the colors don't relate all that well to each other, and the marks are sort of floating in ways that are not relating to one another in the picture in at least one of the aesthetic ways IMHO.

    Your picture "Calming Down" sorta fits into this category of not having a lot holding the different bits together, or rather I can't see it. Note that many other paintings do have things going on that allow me entry and show skill.

    Back to the below samples, one can have brilliant ideas that don't necessarily come present in a painting, regardless of the artist's intention. Not everything works equally well. Experiments are experiments. And there are personal paintings in which the viewer is of no consequence to the artist. In that case, it doesn't need to connect with anyone. However if the viewer is of any value, some of the artistic conventions should be adhered to. And maybe the pic could be brought around to where there's a spine or visual theme or even a clever gimmick, or just plain pretty, or grotesque if that's the aim, to make it solid.

    I could compare making a statement through words. There could be babble in which words don't have any relationship. Or one could say something straight, as a flat statement. Then in the hands of a wordsmith, they might start manipulating and layering in meaning and get into double entendre as a way to expand the same old same old. And still again one can craft the sounds to be listened to based on a pattern or rhythmic musicality that when exaggerated takes on an extra layer with the meaning in place or merely for the beauty of the sound.

    And then you could go all the way to James Joyce who does all kinds of things, much of which is very esoteric and inaccessible while being brilliant and innovative, and to some it has gone full circle back to the babble stage, at least until they figure out the sense of it. People are free to rise to his level or not. It could be considered brilliant to those who are into what he's doing, and there are those who are put off by it. There's something to hang on to for some. However, I don't see people adopting writing like that though, and there are reasons for that but I don't want to digress too much here.

    What I'm getting at is that the artist makes sense of things and then presents them in ways that communicate that sense or orderliness. I don't think it particularly meritorious or artistic to not make any headway of sorting reality in ways that create new things, or new ways of thinking, or something else of use. To find the sense of something is what it's all about. And then to communicate that with skill is the next step. Abstraction appears to push toward the chaotic, but it's really a re-aligning, a way of seeing according to a new set of parameters. And I personally most value that when it leads to something more. That's where the genius comes in.

    Choosing one of those usual painting qualities to color the statement, in my opinion, makes for a stronger piece because paintings that are using things that make visual sense and have shape or pattern context one shape to the next in a painting show that the painter or writer or musician likely has something articulate to say. Were one to go in the other direction it becomes babble and is not sorted into an order of any kind -- that puts too much of the owe-ness on the viewer or reader to do the work for the artist. In a manner of speaking, I believe the abstract artist should present a statement in their painting(s) with arguments to support that postulation.

    I think it's rather important as an artist to be able to sort reality in some way through Art. That's my personal aesthetic. Then it comes down to how well or badly that is achieved. That should not intimidate an artist, it should give parameters within which the sky's the limit.

    Anyway, look at Miro below. And I'm sure he had something in mind and was probably quite sincere. Yet I don't like this painting at all for the reasons I have covered here. It's random and chaotic to my eye. And that's the part I don't really relate to.

    Some other of Klee's stuff (not shown here) is subtle and brilliant and cohesive, while being abstract and unconventional for the time. But this below attached work is visually weak to my way of looking at art. At the time I'm sure it was very cutting edge and for that it had more than a little value in that context. I think that's part of the danger revisiting some of those ideas from a point in the evolution of art.

    Anything done now in those veins has got to hold visually strong because the ideas have been in the open already and it's no longer innovative. That comes later for the contemporary artist to make it their own and then do something using their voice and then as a result hit those new cutting edge places that are out there to be discovered. Can't be forced, but exploring based on a good look is a better idea than walking the same path not looking so hot. So I would say pick the old stuff that's solid because it gives us more solid choices to grow into.

    And that is what I meant about the fuller pics you do like this one in which there is a cohesive quality. I like your pic in this thread because I can evaluate it based on certain conventions. "Cooling Down" represents the other end that I feel I have less to work with. Doesn't mean it's bad. Just means it slips through my fingers before I can get something from it.

    What do you think? I mean this to be a dialog.
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    Last edited by D Akey; 09-27-2011 at 03:28 AM.
    "Not a bit is wasted and the best is yet to come. . ." -- remembered from a dream

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