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Thread: Man from Borana Tribe

  1. #1
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Rome (Italy)
    Posts
    24,113

    Man from Borana Tribe

    From a reference picture in an half-impressionistic style.
    I finished the previous WIP. Id didn't take that much.
    Oils, simply one layer on a sky background layer.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Click image for larger version. 

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    Panta rei (everything flows)!

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    London
    Posts
    1,092
    Ceasar,

    Very well done and very expressive portrait.

    Sincerely,

    Best,

    Weeks

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Very Small town in Illinois
    Posts
    5,170
    Amazing... excellent work Caesar!
    My Gallery:

    http://members.artrage.com/vb_users/2939
    Deviant Art Gallery:


  4. That turned out quite good! Congrats!

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Location
    Prineville Oregon
    Posts
    6,179
    a very strong portrait, the loose style emphasis's the strenght of the man's face, and the color work is super. the light blue sky plays nicely with the reds and browns.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Posts
    22,386
    Good, Caesar, but I would recommend that you keep in mind that unless we are doing abstraction or some very artsy treatment, we want to see the face/head first and have that read with clarity. Then we can enjoy the marks and colors and all that. Focus on depicting the anatomy of the face in all cases. Then you can enhance what the photos show so that it reads properly, if not better than the photo (in which descriptive information may be less clear cause a photo is a photo and is questioned less). Use your knowledge of the planes of the face.

    Dark faces have generally less 'wiggle room' when painting them. It all pretty much has to be in relative proportion regarding the values. They tend to do better when everything is describing a form and then also texture.

    I would also recommend perhaps starting from a middle value as a ground/canvas. especially if you are going to break up the strokes as you are doing. It's not essential, but it's a good device for keeping your values from having errant flecks of light between the strokes.

    (I know I'm getting tedious but screw it, haha). Also, you may want to think in terms of the beauty and clarity of your strokes.

    Anyway, I am really admiring your work lately. You have always been very ambitions and and you are showing a new quality of late.

    Well done!
    "Not a bit is wasted and the best is yet to come. . ." -- remembered from a dream

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jun 2009
    Location
    uk
    Posts
    5,883
    A great portrait dear Cesare. but then I never expected anything less from your talented hands
    Treat Others as you wish to be treated

    http://mannafig.deviantart.com/

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
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    14,335

  9. #9
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Rome (Italy)
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    24,113
    Thank You, dear Weeks. An enjoyable excercise and an outcome of some impact, but much room to improve, especially as for painting planning and discipline.

    Dear Barnburner, I was impressed by the effect of the blues on such a dark skin and I tried to study all possible colors, tones and hues reflected. Probably too many for one portrait only ... Thank You!

    Thank you, dear Artroland! I'd say it's a sort of Carnival style, with such a colorful outcome, but another good lesson anyway. I could get two three different palettes out of this wild experiment ... if I were a methodical guy.

    Dear Gxhpainter, as you say this dark face, its wrinkles, different planes and strong features under the sky was really appealing for a portrait attempt and an enjoyable, spontaneous outburst of sped paint strokes laying.
    Thank You very much!

    Dear D Akey, Your advice is always very precious and right to the point.
    I see what You say and I'm convinced You're right on every single statement. My most sincere thanks, dear friend!
    Actually, in order to speed up getting images (or rather their interpretations, since the starting picture here had a low resolution, quite dark skin tones and transition and toned down hues that could not be appreciated), I always leave basics, planning and golden rules behind, especially now that I fancifully targeted a sort of alla prima, impressionistic direct approach (and frankly a too ambitious one, since I'm not Titien, Velasquez, Rembrandt or Rubens for sure).
    Even worse, I don't build a palette or start from a precise gamut. I therefore pick colors quickly and intuitively in an unrestrained domain and don't take time to make the best stroke signs. In ArtRage, real blending is very good, but color mixing don't get also darker tones with complementary ones, as it seems to happen with real pigments for getting greys and blacks.
    Finally, finishing by glazing or any other means is something I mostly skip.
    I'm a disaster with discipline and I could not proceed this way if this were my job; they'd fire me for evident erraticity and outcome unreliability ...
    Panta rei (everything flows)!

  10. #10
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Rome (Italy)
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    24,113
    What gratifying comments from You, dear Sandra and Amanda!
    Thank You very much ladies!
    Panta rei (everything flows)!

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