ArtRage 5 Product PageArtRage Lite Product PageArtRage for iPad Product PageArtRage for Android Product PageArtRage  Android Oil Painter Free Product PageArtRage  Free Demos Page

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 12

Thread: Resolution question maybe? I don't understand what's wrong.

  1. #1

    Resolution question maybe? I don't understand what's wrong.

    I created a new painting at 4000x3000 at 300x300 DPI.

    On export...

    1. It's only 96x96 DPI.

    2. The painting always opens up at 23%. That's OK, I guess. I just zoom back to where I need it. However...

    3. ...the JPG is always 4000x3000 with a *tiny* image of my painting in the middle of it.

    So, why is it not 300 DPI resolution and how do I get my painting to be the full 4000x3000?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    Ambient Design
    Gallery
    View images
    Posts
    3,842
    If you create a large painting and save it as an ArtRage painting file (*.ptg) when you re-open it we 'zoom' the painting so all of it is visible on your screen. If you are opening your 4000 x 3000 painting in a 1024 x 768 window, it will be zoomed out to around 23% to fit all of the painting inside that window.

    The only Export format that correctly supports your DPI setting is Photoshop PSD. All other export formats (jpg, png, bmp etc) discard the paintings DPI setting and default to your computers screen DPI (depending on what viewing application you're using)

    Note that the DPI settings are only important when it comes to printing the painting. DPI makes no difference on your screen. A 4000 x 3000 pixel image at 300 DPI gives exactly the same amount of detail on your screen as a 4000 x 3000 image at 72DPI.

    When you're doing your painting, are you painting over the entire canvas? If you have a 4000 x 3000 painting, zoomed to 100% on a 1024 x 768 display, you're only able to see a small portion of your canvas. If you only paint in the area you can see, and dont move the canvas around inside ArtRage to access other areas of your painting (or zoom out to see the whole canvas) you will only be painting on a small area of the canvas.

    If you only want to paint at 100% in the visible area of your window, choose a smaller canvas size. There is a button in the New File panel to set your canvas size to the size of your window.
    AndyRage's mantra for graphics engine code:
    "Sure - how hard can it be?"

  3. #3

    Gotcha, but...

    Right, I wanted to see what a nice large print would look like.

    Also, I got confused by seeing someone else's JPG that was 300 DPI, here. They must have exported as PSD then exported to JPG from there. Anyway...

    I understand now about the canvas and the zoom. My question now is:

    1. Is there some way to save my painting? I painted on it at 100% zoom, and obviously the image is in the middle, itty-bitty.

    Is it possible to get the painting itself back to 100% say at 1024x768?

    Sorry for my ignorance in this matter.

  4. #4

    Oops, still learning!

    Oops, it appears "Resize the Canvas" was just what I needed.

    OK, another question then...

    Would it be possible to get my painting 100% in say, 1600x1200?

    As it is now, if I resize the canvas to that size the painting is still in the middle.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    Ambient Design
    Gallery
    View images
    Posts
    3,842
    There is an option in the edit menu called 'Rescale the painting'
    That will stretch or squash the actual contents of the canvas to the new size, rather than just cutting off or adding to the edges of the canvas.
    AndyRage's mantra for graphics engine code:
    "Sure - how hard can it be?"

  6. #6

    Still a little 'fused.

    OK, I am still a little confused. Let's go back to the original.

    4000x3000 image that sits at 23%.

    What would I do *exactly* to get it to be 4000x3000, but the painting is 100%?

    As usual, thanks for the patience in my slow learning.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    Ambient Design
    Gallery
    View images
    Posts
    3,842
    Your window size is only 1024 x 768. You can't view the entire 4000 x 3000 painting unless we scale the view down to 23%
    Note that when we scale the view, we're not actually scaling the contents of your painting, we're just displaying it so it can fit into your window. If you paint on the canvas while it's zoomed out to 23%, the paint is still applied at 100% to the canvas, but the result is zoomed out again so you can see it in your window.

    You have the option of zooming in to 100% (or even closer) - the canvas stays exactly the same size - still 4000 x 3000, but you can see less area of it in your small window. You can pan the canvas around to see other areas of it. Or you can zoom back out to 23% to see the entire canvas.

    Remember - even though your view is zoomed out, when you paint it is still applied at one-to-one 100% on the canvas.

    I guess I should ask why you want your painting to be 4000 x 3000 in particular anyway.
    AndyRage's mantra for graphics engine code:
    "Sure - how hard can it be?"

  8. #8
    Quote Originally Posted by AndyRage
    Your window size is only 1024 x 768. You can't view the entire 4000 x 3000 painting unless we scale the view down to 23%
    Note that when we scale the view, we're not actually scaling the contents of your painting, we're just displaying it so it can fit into your window. If you paint on the canvas while it's zoomed out to 23%, the paint is still applied at 100% to the canvas, but the result is zoomed out again so you can see it in your window.
    Ah, sorry. I meant get my painting to fill the 4000x3000 canvas. Not see it at 100%, but make it fill 100%.

    Quote Originally Posted by AndyRage
    Remember - even though your view is zoomed out, when you paint it is still applied at one-to-one 100% on the canvas.
    Yeah, that's the part that eluded me at first. I'll know for the future.

    Quote Originally Posted by AndyRage
    I guess I should ask why you want your painting to be 4000 x 3000 in particular anyway.
    Um, I'm not quite sure how to respond to that one.

    I want a really large painting? I want to be able to smudge stuff around and it looks better when you scale it down (and people cannot notice your smudges).

    I wanted a huge image that I could make into different widths and heights for wallpapers?

    Am I missing something?

    Thanks for your help and advice. (Although I still don't know if I can make my painting fit, stretch, whatever to the size of the canvas.)

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
    Location
    Vevey, Switzerland
    Gallery
    View images
    Posts
    332
    Just jumping in - the size of the printout is for me each time a "problem" to understand. As I did my Arts in the past ever in real and also in large size it's new for me to look at the dpi value.

    5120 x 4096 pixel sized image with 72 dpi will be 181cm x 144cm
    5120 x 4096 pixel sized image with 96 dpi will be 135cm x 108cm
    5120 x 4096 pixel sized image with 300 dpi will be 43cm x 35cm
    5120 x 4096 pixel sized image with 600 dpi will be 22cm x 17cm

    But I don't know / understand what this exactly mean for print out.

    If I zoom 5120 x 4096 pixel 72 dpi on screen - is this exactly 181cm x 144cm on the screen? Will it be exactly in the same quality if I just print out on 181cm x 144cm sized canvas?

    If I want to print out on 181cm x 144cm sized canvas with must I paint with 300dpi at least and 21378 x 17008 pixel? Or will it be the same printout quality if I use 5120 x 4096 pixel 72 dpi?

    ARRGGSSSS - I'm totally confused and lost...

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    Copenhagen, Denmark
    Gallery
    View images
    Posts
    400
    There are a few norms when doing digital art. You must take into account how the print is gonna be viewed. Is it art to be printed to hang on the wall? Is it a for a poster? Is it for a book? Is it for a photo print. What is it for?

    Now if you want to print something really big, like a poster or even bigger, you would need alot of pixels to be able to do a highquality print. Well, that is what you would think anyways, but in reality you don't need it. Movie sized posters are generally not printend in super high quality and thus a dpi around 150 would be sufficient. Same with wall art, I would say. You don't need need the high pixels number since the art will be seen from afar, and not normally at closeup rage. Just like some traditional art is better, or even supposed to be seen from a distance where the colors can blend together.

    Ofcourse, if you want the printed artwork to be supercrisp even at close range then yes, you need the high pixel numbers to be able to print in the 300dpi range. This would indeed be true if you are printing at scale like A4 or smaller.

    But I would say stay away from going higher than 150 dpi unless you are printing smaller on a smaller scale.

    I would also say that you can easily and with great effect upscale a 150dpi painting to a 300dpi size if you apply a subtle noise filter after the upscaling.

    But, try it out. The whole printing process is a science in itself, and even professional prints can differ quite a deal.

    you can also do a quick search in the technical forum for 'dpi'. You will get a lot of useful info in those threads that come up.

    http://www2.ambientdesign.com/forums...pic.php?t=2855

    this one springs to mind, heh.

    cheers,
    Peter
    Lead Concept Artist - NDS Denmark
    Illustrator
    www.petervillumsen.com

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •