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Thread: Adjusting a custom brush

  1. #1

    Adjusting a custom brush

    The brushstroke on the center is a custom brush. The surface below is brushed with a regular one. The custom brush looks a bit more distent. And a bit more like wires. Which controls alows to adjust it to look more like a regular brushstroke?

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  2. #2
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
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    Try this custom brush

    AR6DOsCustomBrush.arpack

    I used it to create this:

    Click image for larger version. 

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  3. #3
    Quote Originally Posted by DarkOwnt View Post
    Try this custom brush
    If it is the same brush you posted sometime before then I used the same brush (with small changes)

    Quote Originally Posted by DarkOwnt View Post
    I used it to create this
    I recognize Mark Carder method, am I right? Did you mix your colors on a canvas or they were picked from a reference?

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
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    Hi cinematik,

    The brush could be the same one... but this one is for AR6 and is meant for painting, I also posted one for blending, and one for blending colors to make a palette.



    Yes I was attempting to use Mark Carder's method in ArtRage. The idea WAS to learn/train to paint digitally, avoid mess and chemicals, and if I was good enough and liked it, invest in real paints and equipment some day.


    So, I did what I could to replicate his method in digital form. I had to tweak the approach, since there was no analog to a proportional divider for drawing nor a color checker for comparing colors, and unfortunately, the real experience of mixing oil paint colors, and its application to canvas simply cannot be replicated accurately in any current software available.


    So, I ended up using a grid to assist with drawing, (still a valid traditional method) which required I actually practice drawing skills.

    For mixing color, I settled on mixing paint swatches in an unused area, and then dabbing them on a digital reference to check accuracy. Similar to Mark's method when using a photo for reference.
    Again, since the tools were not programmed around such an approach, it was quite time consuming and awkward to "dab and wipe off".

    Also, after some time, I became aware I was not learning how to mix oil paint color... I was mixing digital colors, which is completely different. I completely avoided picking colors with the color picker... even though I realized that mixing my own colors digitally really was not teaching me anything about painting. But I did practice getting values right and asking myself... is it more orange or blue, is it more green or red, is it more purple or yellow....


    PS do you have a full version of the green hair piece to share?

  5. #5
    Quote Originally Posted by DarkOwnt View Post
    The brush could be the same one... but this one is for AR6 and is meant for painting, I also posted one for blending, and one for blending colors to make a palette.
    Hi, could you post those variants here again?

    well, I have the same idea to practice digitally to develop the necessary skills in mixing paints and so on. But lately I’ve come to the conclusion that it’s a rather different experience to paint in real life or in a program. I personally haven't tried using the method I asked about before, as it seemed pretty tedious to me.

    As for those green hair I completely redrawn them without `use real color blending` option and as it often happens, the result turned out to be a little different, and I did not save the first `green` variant. but even disabling this option still does not completely eliminate unexpected colors when mixed.

    So, I ended up using a grid to assist with drawing, (still a valid traditional method) which required I actually practice drawing skills.
    I still just usign a layer with a reference photo to redraw what I need but I feel it's realy teaching us nothing so using a method you are talking about is realy alternative and still a valid alternative. If you ever watched `Portrait painter of the year` then it becomes clear that more than half of the participants use this method, including experienced artists, and no one really bothers.

    unfortunately, the real experience of mixing oil paint colors, and its application to canvas simply cannot be replicated accurately in any current software available
    I came to the same conclusion, but even considering this, you paint, you mix paints, and in the end you enjoy creativity.
    Last edited by cinematik; 05-11-2022 at 03:39 AM.

  6. #6
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    Here is a link to the palette blender. This is not useful for painting and really is only good for making color strings and mixing on a virtual palette.

    https://forums.artrage.com/showthrea...alette+blender


    My brushy blender was really for AR5 and has no texture... you can make a new one: just duplicate your favorite brush with "Color Refresh" (in brush designer) set to zero, save it under a new name.
    This makes a new blender with the same look as your favorite brush, only it puts no paint down, just blends what is already on the canvas.

  7. #7
    DarkOwnt, thanks for sharing.

  8. #8
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    Glad to help!

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Sep 2022
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    Thank you for the help and the art you showed is good ~ Jozef Behr Music Academy.

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