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Thread: How to eliminate greenish hair tint?

  1. #1

    How to eliminate greenish hair tint?

    How to eliminate green hair tint? If it can help the bluish background is a separate layer. That color appears when using palette knife (flat type) from blue to main brownish color.

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    Last edited by cinematik; 04-22-2022 at 07:12 AM.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Oct 2016
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    if you can paint that part in with "custom brush" tool (you should have depth enabled for it to blend back and forth with oil/palette knife tools), that would be the easiest way to do this.

    custom brush uses a more predictable paint blending compared to oil brush which was introduced in artrage before oil and palette knife tools which sometimes add a bit of strange colors into the mix.

  3. #3
    Quote Originally Posted by nekomata View Post
    sometimes add a bit of strange colors into the mix
    it's annoying, also using too much of blending makes color oversatutated

    Quote Originally Posted by nekomata View Post
    if you can paint that part in with "custom brush" tool, that would be the easiest way to do this
    repainted it with ordinary brush since I'm not familiar with custom one
    Last edited by cinematik; 04-23-2022 at 02:34 AM.

  4. #4
    Join Date
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    Whilst not helping with colours that have already been mixed, but going forward, I would add that in AR Vitae the user dose have some ability to tweak and customise the colour blending engine used in ARV.
    It can be accessed by going to: Tools > Colour Options > Paint Mix Profile Panel.
    From that panel you can also access the Paint Mix Presets panel which contains a couple of other options other than the Default blending.
    And of course you can always Save your own custom colour blending presets too.
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  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by cinematik View Post
    it's annoying, also using too much of blending makes color oversatutated
    well artrage oil blending was quite a breakthrough back in the day. artrage is not a new application.

    custom brush would require some time to get familiar with, but the results are beautiful and in my opinion it makes artrage oils truly shine when both are combined.

    alternatively, you can paint in chunks where problematic blending appears on a separate layer and merge them down afterwards.

  6. #6
    I should have turned off the `blend real colors` option, as mentioned by markw, because as long as this option is on, blending works like for real paints, and it gave this result.
    Last edited by cinematik; 04-25-2022 at 05:15 AM.

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by cinematik View Post
    as long as this option is on, blending works like for real paints, and it gave this result.
    Not quite...ArtRage has never been able to blend like real oil paints (in fact I know of no software which does). e.g. Orange and blue cancel to create grey in real paints, as do red and green, yellow and purple. Complex interaction of light with the particles in the pigments give rise to such results. ArtRage has been able to figure out a way to make blue and yellow make green (like real oils) but ArtRage's oil tools sometimes adds saturation whereas in real life saturation is more or less linearly reduced (imagine the straight line on the color wheel). Please note, blending is fixed with the custom brush. Blending of the custom brush (as a paintbrush or a blender) does not add any saturation artefacts.

    The resulting blending behavior of oils is not something any software painting program (of which I am aware) has achieved yet. Which is quite surprising to me. A program would only need to translate the on-screen colors into a color space appropriate for blending oils, where blue and orange, red and green, and yellow and purple, are on opposite sides of a color wheel in color space. This only requires a transformation in HUE (not value or saturation) of the colors prior to a linear blending, which would take care of everything via the blending, and a further transformation back to normal color space. In fact to save on calculation, the oilspace color space would be used almost exclusively internally (format of the stored canvas colors), and only translated into screen color components, when displayed or saved as standard graphics formats.

    Existing programs would have to implement extra steps to transform the colors, blend and transform them back... but CPUs are so much more powerful now-a-days, and optimizations can be easily implemented, in fact memory is so cheap and fast, calculations could be replaced by lookup tables of sufficient size, and then there are powerful GPUs that can be harnessed also.


    Plus, soon 8-bit per channel has to go bye bye... it's far too coarse for subtle work.


    Anywho... hoping someday someone will implement a real oil paint blending engine.
    Last edited by DarkOwnt; 05-06-2022 at 03:22 AM.

  8. #8
    Quote Originally Posted by DarkOwnt View Post
    ArtRage's oil tools sometimes adds saturation.
    I would say too much satutation and it is espessially true when trying to blend much. I've repeatedly noticed that you start working with one level of tone saturation, but after working with pallete knife the overall colors became noticeably more saturated, but this conclusion is basing on working with basic oil painting tools.

    Quote Originally Posted by DarkOwnt View Post
    ArtRage has never been able to blend like real oil paints (in fact I know of no software which does).
    I got curious about mixing colors like on a real palette of base colors and now I'm not sure if it's a good idea i.e. does it make sense to try it if ArtRge blends as you say... Before I just sampling colos from a reference image with a picker but that's certainly not how a real artist works. But perhaps another issue arises here - since this is an imitation of painting by digital means, it may be more appropriate to apply the appropriate techniques that digital painting offers.

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