Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 19

Thread: Rebelle 4

  1. #1
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Location
    England
    Posts
    137

    Rebelle 4

    Artrage is IMO by far the best digital art programme around.

    But I do have others, and Rebelle is one, so in anticipation of the new Rebelle 4 I did a painting in Rebelle 3.

    It is good, very good, and I like it, but ...

    ... I have a very simple way of comparing differing applications: I do the same painting in both Artrage and any alternative.

    The outcome is always the same. Artrage is better. Always !!!!!!!!

    I saw a user's comment last night in Rebelle's YouTube pre-announcement saying that Artrage is so 'past it'. That the programme is never (rarely, surely) updated and is showing its age.

    So this morning I did my normal process; a painting in Rebelle 3 and the same job in Artrage.

    The winner? As ever, Artrage. You lads (and lassies, obviously) have a winner (even if Argentina did defeat you!).

    Pat

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Posts
    1,476
    Hi Pat
    I may just have to agree with you
    All paint programs have their good and bad points, and AR is no exception, but it is the one I keep coming back to if not reaching for first when painting.
    Maker Of Replica Macoys

    Techie Stuff:
    ArtRage 6.1.1 ~ 15" Macbook Pro
    ~ macOS 10.14.6 ~ 4 Core i7 3.1GHz CPU ~ 16GB RAM ~ Wacom Intuos4 M

  3. #3
    I do love the water affects in Rebelle and the oil effects in Artrage. Good excuse to buy both!

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Oct 2016
    Posts
    124
    I've just watched the video announcement, and judging by that, as well the screenshots that escapemotion have posted, it looks inspired by the vile corel painter thick paint oil brush set.

    rebelle watercolors are genius, but this oil thing is not it. not interested at all.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Posts
    583
    It seems like the software (Rebelle 4) is focused on the end result (of skilled or unskilled strokes) looking like oil (to a layperson), rather than the process of painting feeling (to a real media artist) like using real oils. The teaser video shows a guy doing stuff in a way that does not seem to match reality. Something like instadry is used first (I do like how the already dry paint acts as texture for the subsequent strokes...) and then alla prima with a knife.... and then "melting" of the paint with... I don't know what melts paint quite like that.


    In my view, when simulating an existing media (like oils) this superficial focus on whether laypersons can make things look like what they think oil should look like, is a mistake by most developers.


    IMHO for the next leaps in this technology to win over real media and mixed media artists, the focus has to be on the process of painting itself, daubing and stroking, and blending, and having that process feel more like using real paint.



    I think the first developer to introduce into their software a subtractive and additive color system, one which mimics the real additive (opaque) and subtractive (transparent) elements in real world pigments, which are found in real media, so that an experienced oil painter familiar with for example the the Zorn palette can mix away and get expected results, will take the market by storm.


    A paint material element at a pixel could be broken down as consisting of RGBCMY or RGBCMYK which builds up in proportion as paint is added and mixes in proportion as it is blended.

    Light reflects directly off of RGB pigment components, which is combined with
    the light reflected by the canvas through CMYK pigment components (which attenuates transmission subtractively)
    which is also added to the light due to RGB in the bulk of the paint reflected but also as attenuated by CMYK.

    As the bulk paint is added (more coverage) more and more CMYK results more transmissive attenuation of the paper color, and while the bulk RGB is added in proportion, since it is opaque, it simply attenuates the overall amount of light from the paper transmitting through CMYK. The RBG reflected through the CMYK remains the same in proportion to the light directly from RBG, but both become proportionally dominant with coverage due to the increasing opacity contributed by the RBG.


    The recipe for these can be discovered with some math and experimentation. All kinds of pigments in theory should be capable of representation using this and mixing colors should reduce to mixing these kinds of pigment element amounts. Glazes, and transparent paints... and arbitrary levels of thinner (RGBCMYKT - T for transparent?) could be simulated.


    But the above is speculation as regards to how one achieves simulation of real world media blending... it may be incorrect or simply not the best way of doing this... all I know is the software that cracks that nut and makes a real oil painter feel that blending colors on screen is the same as in real life...
    that indeed will be the winner.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Dec 2020
    Posts
    1

    Python Training in Chennai

    Python is an interpreted, high-level and general-purpose programming language. Best Python Training Institute in Chennai with high quality Trainers. Get Placed in MNC's with high Quality Training at Best Price. Really this is very good information. I really enjoyed it. Thank you for sharing the information. Keep on sharing the information.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Location
    England
    Posts
    137
    Mark, I agree. I always, always, come back to AR. It isn't perfect, we all know that, but it is the best IMO.

    Kate, I agree. The only thing is that for all Rebelle's wonderful watercolours I've yet to produce anything with them that I'm totally satisfied with. In fact, their Acrylics produce better results, for me. This is all so personal.

    Nekomata, I'll (probably) give Rebelle's oils a try - with an open mind. Who knows?

    DarkOwnt, Thank you for your interesting and detailed observations.

    It raises a question I often ask, is the way forward for digital painting programmes to be exactly that: digital? Is the quest to mimic 'real life' a false premise?

    I'm not sure, but the one thing I always looking for is the ability to blend colours on the canvas in a way that feels organic and natural. That, and the ability to produce work that is satisfying.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Posts
    583
    Hi Pat:

    I don’t believe each software needs to do everything or to be everything to everybody. Many will and should push the boundaries of new digital media (black ink and its brush engine comes to mind), whose end look, and active feel can be anything ingenuity can dream up.

    That said, there will always be room and some demand for a digital simulation of traditional media. I’m not a proponent of software doing the latter versus the former, after all we live in free countries, the market will demand what the market demands, but I am primarily in the market for the latter, and voting with my wallet for advancements in that area. And IMHO ArtRage is very well placed in the latter market versus the former.
    Last edited by DarkOwnt; 12-10-2020 at 03:10 AM.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    May 2013
    Location
    England
    Posts
    137
    Yes, DarkOwnt, I agree. What will happen, I am sure, is that each piece of software will create its own niche ...

    Rebelle, watercolour?

    Ar, Oils?

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Posts
    583
    I think AR is still at or near the top of the market for oils/acrylics and the custom brush is perhaps even better than the built in ones. And yes Rebelle's big draw is its watercolor.

    Now AR (and also Rebelle) is also a good "all rounder", and it needs to be that to stay competitive, but being a "a good all rounder" is only a necessary condition, not "sufficient condition" for viable continued existence in the market.

    Due to the innovations of its creators, AR's marquee features and realism in oils sets it enough apart, puts it shoulder to shoulder with the best, and ensures its continuing viable place in the market.


    Hopefully, as the market continues to improve and becomes more competitive, AR's new features and developments will continue to keep it at the top.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •