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Thread: DOs - SquareMess Brushes (brushes 6-8 of 8)

  1. #31
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    I can't say enough about how awesome Datacolor calibration is especially the printer paper calibration. the interaction of ink with each paper and any different print setting (halftoning or diffuse etc) really creates drastically different results so you need a different calibration for every paper and printer setting combination you use, in order to get accurate results. Spyder print is worth every penny !!

  2. #32
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    Or for a very low tech way, try holding up your printed artwork, and fiddle with the monitor settings until they match

  3. #33
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    Quote Originally Posted by HR
    Or for a very low tech way, try holding up your printed artwork, and fiddle with the monitor settings until they match
    That's a good idea to Hannah! Thanks for sharing.

    I just stumbled on this fairly recent YT video about "Make your own damn brushes!" I agree with some of his beliefs but not all. This may give us some insights or ideas. It is provocative that is for sure!

    Robert Hopkins

  4. #34
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    HS are you on a windows machine or a Mac?

  5. #35
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    Apple IMac with a Wacom QHD monitor.
    Robert Hopkins

  6. #36
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    Hey, DO!

    I have been struggling with health issues and the lack of caffeine my doctor says I can drink. I have been blah-toe boy lately!

    I see what you mean about setting the aspect ratio on the oil brush to allow me to have the tail of the stroke be rounded. Setting it very low (even 0%) is what I was looking for. Thanks, Maestro!
    Robert Hopkins

  7. #37
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    Quote Originally Posted by HwyStar View Post
    Hey, DO!

    I have been struggling with health issues and the lack of caffeine my doctor says I can drink. I have been blah-toe boy lately!

    I see what you mean about setting the aspect ratio on the oil brush to allow me to have the tail of the stroke be rounded. Setting it very low (even 0%) is what I was looking for. Thanks, Maestro!
    Sorry to hear about your challenges hope things take a better turn for you.

    Not sure what you mean or to what I have said you are referring to but I'm glad to hear you have found settings you can use!

  8. #38
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    I was referring to the Aspect Ratio setting of the oil brush that is right below the Square Brush "clickable" option. I set it to 0% Aspect Ratio and that seems to help with the brush strokes. Without it being too technical for my tiny brain.

    I re-worked my pink Tulip painting above and printed it to send to my Grand Daughter. Here is the finished painting:

    Click image for larger version. 

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    Robert Hopkins

  9. #39
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    Quote Originally Posted by HwyStar View Post
    That's a good idea to Hannah! Thanks for sharing.

    I just stumbled on this fairly recent YT video about "Make your own damn brushes!" I agree with some of his beliefs but not all. This may give us some insights or ideas. It is provocative that is for sure!


    This is a very cool share. I'm not entirely sure about his saying to paint an entire painting using only one brush. I agree that if one introduces into a painting a brush that does something really at odds with the painting it could stand apart from the rest of the painting which would be distracting and look like a flaw or bad choice.

    On the other hand, it depends on how you paint and how much any one stroke is a component to the level of finish. I don't think the brush matters in some cases, and could actually enhance the beauty. Plus, using one brush could make a painting's marks redundant. That might be analogous to a musician only playing quarter notes. Fine if you're Bach or Philip Glass or to draw attention to the fact that it's deliberately limited.

    In the real world I used many different brushes where the rule of thumb was to use the biggest brush you could get away with and adapt to each step in the process. But they all had their uses. For me, with my style, I got to where the painting mechanics were invisible, and so the point was the illusion of reality rather than a painterly painting. Granted, that's merely one way, but there are stages in all paintings where one builds up a painting to a point and only the last bravura strokes matter. In that case, using one brush would be good, varying the size and so forth, for highlights or to make it look juicy.

    None the less, it's always good to be exposed to different techniques and ideas and it's good to give them a go and see what happens in a practical context. Limits are not necessarily a bad thing.

    And as to making your own brushes -- I think that's a brilliant idea and may be one of the ways to create a unique look. But for me, I like to have variety and lots of choices, the more the better. It comes from the type of purposes one has for doing art. I have done a goodly amount of photo manipulation and so I use lots of tricks using selections and blending, smearing and adjusting etc what is already there to begin with. So they may not be considered a brush per say, but they are a way to make a mark. I have then used that for paintings as well. And things I do with paintings can have application for messing with photos.

    Anyway, I can now see what you were doing with the tulips painting, where it looks as if you used one brush to see where it went. Very cool experiment. It felt sort of Seurat pointillist which is fine if one is Seurat or exploring a concept (optically mixing) rather than merely technique farther down the evolutionary time line. Just as a late comment with a little more of an idea where you were going with it, I might suggest you try maybe introducing some variety. But by all means you're way out in front on this with the brushes. I just downloaded the square brushes and look forward to trying it when I get some time.

    Thanks for sharing all this investigation. It is exciting.
    "Not a bit is wasted and the best is yet to come. . ." -- remembered from a dream

  10. #40
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    Very nice! I liked your sky before for its realism now I also like the new sky for its slight surrealism! Awesome work!

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