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Thread: Canon imagePROGRAF PRO-1000 17" printer

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Dec 2013
    Location
    Reno, Nevada
    Posts
    325

    Canon imagePROGRAF PRO-1000 17" printer

    I ordered and received this printer from Amazon last week and all I have to say is WoW!

    Prints; easy-peasy. Printing on canvas, a piece of cake. It takes the possibilities of my digital artwork to a whole new level.

    This becomes a little bit of an expense that does not make sense for everyone but if you have the desire of selling your artwork (long-term) this is a great entry-level printer for creating 16 x 20 print jobs.

    Here is the Amazon link: https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0...?ie=UTF8&psc=1

    If you have any questions for me; since this last week has created a whole new learning curve for me, then please feel free to ask!
    Robert Hopkins

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Posts
    431
    I would expect there to be problems associated with simulated and actual canvas texture not matching perfectly, in pattern, size, orientation, etc. As such an acute observer, or one who is inspecting up close, would notice that the actual undulations in the physical canvas do not match the grain with which paint is laid down/interacting with in the digital canvas used in production of the art work.

    I wonder which of the following represents the best solution:

    1. Printing on matte papers or canvases with no visible physical grain and letting the digital work simulate both paint depth/lighting and canvas grain lighting effects.

    2. Printing on canvas which matches as closely as possible the size and pattern of grain used in the digital work, after painting exporting with "roughness" set to 0 but canvas lighting on, so that simulated paint has depth/lighting, but only the physical canvas provides the canvas lighting effect (so to speak). Here one hopes that the way the paint interacts with the grain simply looks good form far, and far from good (up close)

    3. Printing the artwork with digital canvas lighting on, right onto whatever canvas you can find, and hope for the best (even though two overlapping canvas textures will be observable).

    I'm curious as to which one you will end up adopting and finding workable.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Dec 2013
    Location
    Reno, Nevada
    Posts
    325
    Hey DarkOwnt!

    1. Printing on matte papers or canvases with no visible physical grain and letting the digital work simulate both paint depth/lighting and canvas grain lighting effects.
    When printing prints (signed/numbered) everyone understands the print; is a print, so canvas grain does not matter. My wife and I had that discussion. I have printed on canvas with and without the canvas option turned on. Depending on the look you are after and how much you want a 3% darkness with grain applied, it works or doesn't work for the painting.

    2. Printing on canvas which matches as closely as possible the size and pattern of grain used in the digital work, after painting exporting with "roughness" set to 0 but canvas lighting on, so that simulated paint has depth/lighting, but only the physical canvas provides the canvas lighting effect (so to speak). Here one hopes that the way the paint interacts with the grain simply looks good form far, and far from good (up close)
    In my case if I am ever printing on canvas I am applying a thin coat of Liquitex Gloss varnish on the print job, then I apply brush strokes using Golden Extra Heavy Gel Gloss. With both layers of the varnish applied, the canvas grain strokes/canvas grain are really unnoticeable as being incorrect. The print job must wait for twenty four hours before applying the varnish to allow the drying agents to exit from the print ink. Other than pixel peeping, and other artists that are going to study your work a foot away no one else even understands the print jobs are prints! Our whole house is furnished with Giclee's and not one person who has ever been in our house (including artists) have noticed that these are not originals. We are all way to critical of our own works in my belief.

    3. Printing the artwork with digital canvas lighting on, right onto whatever canvas you can find, and hope for the best (even though two overlapping canvas textures will be observable).
    I like both effects for different reasons. My first print job, the forest I painted has stark contrasts between the shadows of the trees and bright sunlight. The canvas option turned on gave the painting a more vibrant contrast between the light and dark sections. I liked it better turned on.

    I am using the following paper/canvas:
    Canson Infinity PhotoArt Pro Canvas Matte, 17"X40 Roll
    Canson Infinity Baryta Photographique Fine Art Paper, 17"X22" - 25 sheets

    These are all my opinions and yours will probably vary from mine. There is no correct answer to our interpretation of the artwork, ours or others.

    It really is a joy to see the works hanging on the wall in a frame. It makes my artwork come to life!

    PS: I haven't started messing with ICC profiles yet. I am using QImage One (Mac version) to print the tiff files. The colors from the printer have matched my iMac dead on and I have not had to calibrate the monitor at all. So far, I really like the printer.
    Robert Hopkins

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
    Posts
    431
    that is awesome! happy you are happy!

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Dec 2013
    Location
    Reno, Nevada
    Posts
    325
    This is what we are doing this "art thing" for:

    Name:  HannahBananna.jpg
Views: 67
Size:  77.3 KB
    Hannah Banana, our 15-year-old Yorkie
    16x20 printed on canvas with varnish coatings applied
    Robert Hopkins

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