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Thread: awful craft fare experience

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar 2018
    Posts
    3

    Exclamation awful craft fare experience

    Hi, I displayed my water colour paintings at a local craft fare, my stall was near the top of the isle among 20 others, literally no one stopped and commented on mine by the end of it I was in tears, it had taken 3 months to put this together, has any one else experience
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    Last edited by Cindyanne1; 03-19-2018 at 03:20 AM.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Posts
    23,348
    Aw. That hurts.

    Don't let it stop your painting. When one aspires to be an artist there are expectations of needs being fulfilled, one of which is recognition. To be a professional artist one needs to develop a THICK skin. In an art class we would regularly have critiques. People would line up their homework along the wall. And the teacher was BRUTAL -- no prisoners style. He would rip the art apart with criticisms that would often have the students in tears. He would scoff. He would turn the art to the wall. He even tossed one on the floor.

    Why do you think he might do that do you suppose?

    He knew that's what happens in the world. It can be emotionally devastating. But if the artist can't rise above it, if the artist is in tears (for real or inside) they're sunk and they're likely to quit -- all the more if a client or customer sees you will crumble. They don't have time for that kind of open wound. That then not only asks them to pay you but also to fix you, and that's a no go (ever again) in the professional world for that client.

    I would recommend that you observe the experience. Figure out why people didn't stop (could be any number of reasons from the art to not feeling welcome to nobody else looking at your stuff). When you're out there in public at a stall, you have to do some song and dance. Draw people in. Believe me, they're probably not at the show for the art. They're there for a bit of fun on an afternoon. Make it fun for them. Pull them in as the artist. Do a little dog and pony show. You're the artist. Be an interesting artist. Let them know how you LOVE painting. Let them know how you paint your love of birds and love the idea of putting this love into people's homes. Say, I saw the bird in this particular painting when I was on a trip to. . .when I woke up and it was outside singing. . . when I was. . .

    Also you can always improve your art (as can we all). Find out what combination of experiences touch your passers by. You can't just sit on your keester and hope the art does your talking for you. People buy the artist as much as the art. Tell them why they should give a toot for your work over the people at the next 12 booths.

    So, build a thick skin. People will mostly walk by. That's just how it works. You have to dazzle. You have to paint them an experience. You have to assert yourself. From this painting I kinda see a shyness. Time to blow past it both personally and in your art. More color might help to catch people's eye. Paint male birds that have extraordinary markings.

    All these things go into the complex of selling your art in a tent or whatever. People respond to stories. Paint better. Present your stories better. Act lively like you're going to be interesting. Cause nobody cares if you're hoping to get validated by this. Take the bird by the horns. And YOU HAVE FUN REGARDLESS!!! or you may want to do something else. But if you want to do this for real, then I recommend that you buck up. And invite some friends to stand around browsing your bins. Think like a business person.

    Good luck! It can be fun and a very expansive experience. I can sense you put a lot of love into your work. I feel for you. I really do. I can see you can paint. You have skills. Make choices that are like a bird call in springtime. Project your 'voice'.

    Oh, and PS. Put a matte board on your work. Presentation is everything and it looks like you don't care. I know you do. But imply it too. You want to help the passers by visualize it on their wall. They usually need all the help they can get cause you're the artist and one of your jobs is to help them visualize.
    Last edited by D Akey; 03-19-2018 at 05:39 AM.
    "Not a bit is wasted and the best is yet to come. . ." -- remembered from a dream

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar 2018
    Posts
    3

    Smile Awful Craft Fare Experience

    Quote Originally Posted by D Akey View Post
    Aw. That hurts.

    Don't let it stop your painting. When one aspires to be an artist there are expectations of needs being fulfilled, one of which is recognition. To be a professional artist one needs to develop a THICK skin. In an art class we would regularly have critiques. People would line up their homework along the wall. And the teacher was BRUTAL -- no prisoners style. He would rip the art apart with criticisms that would often have the students in tears. He would scoff. He would turn the art to the wall. He even tossed one on the floor.

    Why do you think he might do that do you suppose?

    He knew that's what happens in the world. It can be emotionally devastating. But if the artist can't rise above it, if the artist is in tears (for real or inside) they're sunk and they're likely to quit -- all the more if a client or customer sees you will crumble. They don't have time for that kind of open wound. That then not only asks them to pay you but also to fix you, and that's a no go (ever again) in the professional world for that client.

    I would recommend that you observe the experience. Figure out why people didn't stop (could be any number of reasons from the art to not feeling welcome to nobody else looking at your stuff). When you're out there in public at a stall, you have to do some song and dance. Draw people in. Believe me, they're probably not at the show for the art. They're there for a bit of fun on an afternoon. Make it fun for them. Pull them in as the artist. Do a little dog and pony show. You're the artist. Be an interesting artist. Let them know how you LOVE painting. Let them know how you paint your love of birds and love the idea of putting this love into people's homes. Say, I saw the bird in this particular painting when I was on a trip to. . .when I woke up and it was outside singing. . . when I was. . .

    Also you can always improve your art (as can we all). Find out what combination of experiences touch your passers by. You can't just sit on your keester and hope the art does your talking for you. People buy the artist as much as the art. Tell them why they should give a toot for your work over the people at the next 12 booths.

    So, build a thick skin. People will mostly walk by. That's just how it works. You have to dazzle. You have to paint them an experience. You have to assert yourself. From this painting I kinda see a shyness. Time to blow past it both personally and in your art. More color might help to catch people's eye. Paint male birds that have extraordinary markings.

    All these things go into the complex of selling your art in a tent or whatever. People respond to stories. Paint better. Present your stories better. Act lively like you're going to be interesting. Cause nobody cares if you're hoping to get validated by this. Take the bird by the horns. And YOU HAVE FUN REGARDLESS!!! or you may want to do something else. But if you want to do this for real, then I recommend that you buck up. And invite some friends to stand around browsing your bins. Think like a business person.

    Good luck! It can be fun and a very expansive experience. I can sense you put a lot of love into your work. I feel for you. I really do. I can see you can paint. You have skills. Make choices that are like a bird call in springtime. Project your 'voice'.

    Oh, and PS. Put a matte board on your work. Presentation is everything and it looks like you don't care. I know you do. But imply it too. You want to help the passers by visualize it on their wall. They usually need all the help they can get cause you're the artist and one of your jobs is to help them visualize.
    Thank you, very good advice, I have never been very thick skinned but totally get what you are saying, I will think this through never wanted to paint again yesterday, but its wearing off a bit now.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    brighton uk
    Posts
    13,557
    Quote Originally Posted by Cindyanne1 View Post
    Thank you, very good advice, I have never been very thick skinned but totally get what you are saying, I will think this through never wanted to paint again yesterday, but its wearing off a bit now.
    yeah Van Gogh only sold I painting all his life and been told Piccasso would sign anything

    So as Cap Mac would say GO GAL GO CIAO SLAINTE

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Mar 2018
    Posts
    3
    So true glad I joined this now feeling much better, even started sharpening the pencils !!!

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Posts
    3,869
    The way you set up your stall will affect your viewers too. If they have to come into a space they perhaps feel they are a bit trapped in will stop them entering. They need an open and welcoming space without you watching over them too closely. Be available, but appearing busy doing something else. Do a demonstration. People love watching artists work. Mr Akey is right, get thick skinned and make sure your presentation is up to scratch.

    Doing a art market is great fun, make it appear so and your enthusiasm will rub off on potential viewers.

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