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Thread: Full House

  1. #1
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    Full House

    kind of excited and a gush of energy and texture, just the rush of spring and warmer weather is having on me...
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  2. #2
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    Looks nice. You're getting splashier and making designs unto their own sense of what works and doesn't. You're breaking rules, so that's very cool and may identify you with a style which is what you've sort of been seeking all along if I'm not mistaken. Probably looks great on garments as accents unto themselves.

    "Not a bit is wasted and the best is yet to come. . ." -- remembered from a dream

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by D Akey View Post
    Looks nice. You're getting splashier and making designs unto their own sense of what works and doesn't. You're breaking rules, so that's very cool and may identify you with a style which is what you've sort of been seeking all along if I'm not mistaken. Probably looks great on garments as accents unto themselves.

    Thanks I am glad someone finally commented on my recent posts, either we have a lot of shy people here or my work is too scary to
    comment on . Anyway using my works as the basis for garments, pillow, bags etc on VIDA has had and interesting effect, I was forced to focus on specific sections of works
    and found I like the more simple and bold graphic effects, which then found their way back into some of my recent works. And I have been watching some great You Tube videos from MOMA and learned a lot and was
    very inspired by people that were new to me ( Agnes Martin for example ) . I have found that AR5 has so many great new features especially layer effects and the custom brush they in themselves are igniting the fires
    of inspiration in me. D Akey Hope all is well in your world great to hear from you again.

  4. #4
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    I think the silence could be linked to a number of things some of which might be:

    1) AR at one point deliberately was targeting the casual user as opposed to going after the pro market. Cost. Playful Features. And I think they actually said it at one point when everybody was bouncing around new feature ideas. The point of mentioning that is that we probably are seeing a more casual user group, many, if not most of whom are not educated in terms of how to critique art. There were also a bunch of people who didn't want comments beyond a word or two.

    2) You're off in modern art and many people just can't relate to modern art. We've been around that discussion many many times. But it's an acquired taste, let's say. I *think* your stuff is more a language than anything else and Google doesn't have a translation choice for that yet.

    3) I don't see a whole lot of comments being posted period. I think it says a lot about a few years down toward saturation from when the internet was fresher.

    4) People generally know that any art that gets posted will likely be stolen. And many of the professional artists have sort of put their cows in the barn so to speak so they can control the commerce of it more.

    And there's a thousand other things. But the upshot is it's not ten years ago anymore.

    Don't take it personally. You're doing great.
    "Not a bit is wasted and the best is yet to come. . ." -- remembered from a dream

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by D Akey View Post
    I think the silence could be linked to a number of things some of which might be:

    1) AR at one point deliberately was targeting the casual user as opposed to going after the pro market. Cost. Playful Features. And I think they actually said it at one point when everybody was bouncing around new feature ideas. The point of mentioning that is that we probably are seeing a more casual user group, many, if not most of whom are not educated in terms of how to critique art. There were also a bunch of people who didn't want comments beyond a word or two.

    2) You're off in modern art and many people just can't relate to modern art. We've been around that discussion many many times. But it's an acquired taste, let's say. I *think* your stuff is more a language than anything else and Google doesn't have a translation choice for that yet.

    3) I don't see a whole lot of comments being posted period. I think it says a lot about a few years down toward saturation from when the internet was fresher.

    4) People generally know that any art that gets posted will likely be stolen. And many of the professional artists have sort of put their cows in the barn so to speak so they can control the commerce of it more.

    And there's a thousand other things. But the upshot is it's not ten years ago anymore.

    Don't take it personally. You're doing great.
    all great points and well taken,

  6. #6
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    I struggle a lot with appreciating 'modern art'. I agree with D Akey comments completely.
    So let me ask some questions. You call this Full House. I see the top of a cane, the claw of a crab, maybe a snake and perhaps a beetle. I do not see house, doors, windows, so why call it full house? The colors are eye catching and if this was on a wall, I would clearly stop and look at it, but would not really appreciate it. How should I be looking at this? If you were standing next to me explaining this to me, what would you say?

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by carlcath View Post
    I struggle a lot with appreciating 'modern art'. I agree with D Akey comments completely.
    So let me ask some questions. You call this Full House. I see the top of a cane, the claw of a crab, maybe a snake and perhaps a beetle. I do not see house, doors, windows, so why call it full house? The colors are eye catching and if this was on a wall, I would clearly stop and look at it, but would not really appreciate it. How should I be looking at this? If you were standing next to me explaining this to me, what would you say?
    Hi carlcath,
    Let me say first that I am delighted with your question, and thank you for stepping forward to ask. I would say that my style of painting is NOT to represent anything, as a side note I was a traditional landscape
    painter using tradional materials like watercolors, oils, pastels, and acrylics for over 20 years. During this phase of my artistic development I read a lot about all kinds of artists and was drawn to works of well known artists like Kandinsky, Klee,Miro, and of course Picasso as well as more recent painters like Jackson Pollock, Franz Kline, Frank Stella, Richard Diebenkorn, John McClean, Agnes Martin, and Albert Irving. By really looking at what this diverse group
    was attempting in their work gave me a great sense of freedom and appreciation for the bones of painting ( Color, Structure/Composition, Mark Making ). So began my journey towards a more abstract work, at first was merely an
    increased stylization of my landscape work and explorations into more vibrant and non-representational color schemes. Eventually as I switched into the digital art world some 20 years now I used by background and learned the new
    technical aspects of digital art ( layers, layer masking, blend modes, and pressure sensitive tablets ) and extended my painting and explored my painting as an extension of music, and dance ( action painting ). People can listen to
    any music from any country and you may or may not like it but you never ask to have it explained! You merely like it or not although you can take music appreciation courses to give a depth of understanding to your listening. The same
    applies to looking at what you call 'modern art'.

    So after saying all that let's talk about Full House in particular. To "see" this painting one must slow down and allow your eye , and mind time to explore its features ( it is nearly 33" x 32" so the little jpeg show here does not really show it off completely ). In it I have creating a rich universe of marks, fluid lines that move from thick to thin, broad strokes that show a bit of canvas texture, a hidden underlying structure of flat colors outlined with black lines, and energetic dots and a few bits scribbled marks in densely saturated color. All these marks are organized into a visual event with a sense of depth, energy and movement. The title Full House is a metaphor for this mental and visual construction with
    so much mark making diversity that the house ( the mental and physical image ) is full. I realize that is a very esoteric explanation and it is not meant to put anyone off but to allow you to wonder and explore that which you see. all this work is not done by just sitting down and slap dashing around with AR tools and color pickers, but is actually done with a very slow and methodical build of of a set of discreet actions, intentions and mark making vocabulary.

    So I hope this is some help to understand this painting and my other works posted. I would suggest watching these You Tube Videos

    The Rules of Abstraction by Matthew Collings

    John Gwinn The Meaning of His Abstract Art

  8. #8
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    Watch This! a great explantion of abstract painting.

    Hi carlcath, and anyone else interesting in the meaning or understanding of abstract painting. I found this to be a very clear explanation, a lot better than
    I could do, from a painter who also moved from traditional watercolors to abstract painting.

    What is Abstract Painting? by David M. Kessler Fine Art

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by gxhpainter View Post
    Hi carlcath, and anyone else interesting in the meaning or understanding of abstract painting. I found this to be a very clear explanation, a lot better than
    I could do, from a painter who also moved from traditional watercolors to abstract painting.

    What is Abstract Painting? by David M. Kessler Fine Art
    I would add to his comment that when one reduces the elements, that puts more weight and importance on the other things comprising the painting.

    Eg: if you have a painting of a duck, and you like ducks a lot, then whether the color is good or the composition is good doesn't matter as much as the duck -- what is the duck doing, is it cute, does it remind me of a time I fed ducks in the park or whatever.
    Remove the duck and you don't have that point of relation. You have color, you have composition, paint marks, and that other stuff.

    That means, if people don't play in the abstract painting sandbox, they probably are NOT aware of those things, it's not going to appeal to them for the most part because there's nothing they value to which all that appeals. It's a hard sell, let's say. Those will have to be amazing colors that they can relate to. The viewer might look at it as an accent only where they see the colors working in their living room, giving it a little something artsy.

    And if one 'doesn't get it', that can make the viewer feel stupid, uneducated, and people don't like being insulted, even though most painters aren't trying to make them feel bad or insulted. Have you ever been in a room where people speak both English (that you speak) and some other language that they speak at home that you do not speak? What does it feel like when they switch to that other language? Same thing happens with abstract art potentially.

    And of course there are people who are really into abstract art and all the Art for Art's Sake kind of thing. They know the language and it has context and criteria wherein they can be in the smart seat. They can gauge the quality or lack thereof. So it's friendlier.

    So there's a psychological grounding for weird feelings about abstraction that is more about us as human viewers than a mere painting style.

    Chalk it up to 'Different strokes for different folks.' But it all can be learned if it appeals to you to do so. If it doesn't, that's okay too. The world is your oyster.

    I like abstract art because I'm an artist. I don't paint that way because it's not my thing. But I'm not intimidated by it so I can look and see if I like it. No harm done. But it was once said to me by a curator of the antiquities section of a museum who was giving a course on art appreciation. He said that if you see the art and you like it, then it's good art. What matters is your relation to it. And only you can know that.

    Enjoy. There are dimensions upon dimensions to all Art and it goes straight to the depth you go.

    "Not a bit is wasted and the best is yet to come. . ." -- remembered from a dream

  10. #10
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    Quote Originally Posted by D Akey View Post
    I would add to his comment that when one reduces the elements, that puts more weight and importance on the other things comprising the painting.

    Eg: if you have a painting of a duck, and you like ducks a lot, then whether the color is good or the composition is good doesn't matter as much as the duck -- what is the duck doing, is it cute, does it remind me of a time I fed ducks in the park or whatever.
    Remove the duck and you don't have that point of relation. You have color, you have composition, paint marks, and that other stuff.

    That means, if people don't play in the abstract painting sandbox, they probably are NOT aware of those things, it's not going to appeal to them for the most part because there's nothing they value to which all that appeals. It's a hard sell, let's say. Those will have to be amazing colors that they can relate to. The viewer might look at it as an accent only where they see the colors working in their living room, giving it a little something artsy.

    And if one 'doesn't get it', that can make the viewer feel stupid, uneducated, and people don't like being insulted, even though most painters aren't trying to make them feel bad or insulted. Have you ever been in a room where people speak both English (that you speak) and some other language that they speak at home that you do not speak? What does it feel like when they switch to that other language? Same thing happens with abstract art potentially.

    And of course there are people who are really into abstract art and all the Art for Art's Sake kind of thing. They know the language and it has context and criteria wherein they can be in the smart seat. They can gauge the quality or lack thereof. So it's friendlier.

    So there's a psychological grounding for weird feelings about abstraction that is more about us as human viewers than a mere painting style.

    Chalk it up to 'Different strokes for different folks.' But it all can be learned if it appeals to you to do so. If it doesn't, that's okay too. The world is your oyster.

    I like abstract art because I'm an artist. I don't paint that way because it's not my thing. But I'm not intimidated by it so I can look and see if I like it. No harm done. But it was once said to me by a curator of the antiquities section of a museum who was giving a course on art appreciation. He said that if you see the art and you like it, then it's good art. What matters is your relation to it. And only you can know that.

    Enjoy. There are dimensions upon dimensions to all Art and it goes straight to the depth you go.

    Well said my friend, I have been in that room and definitely felt the outsider, but I grew to be comforatble getting about 1/4 of what was going on, but that took a little time, I hope our discussion and the You Tube clips find that somewhat rare person with a curious nature and moves them to explore...

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