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Thread: Nocturne No. 5

  1. #1
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    Feb 2011
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    Nocturne No. 5

    Inspired by listening to some Chopin this morning, and some further explorations with lines and fills and blend modes.
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  2. #2
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    Jan 2007
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    Great job!
    As always your personal style!!!
    Regards from Chile
    "El arte no reproduce lo visible. Lo hace visible" Paul Klee

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
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    22,517
    I wonder. . .

    How you might interpret all of the piano nocturnes. I've listened to them over and over in awe. In fact, I would put the Nocturne collection on and fall asleep to it as I would nap -- thus slipping in and out of consciousness and hearing this section and that. -- All piano. . . and what piano! Off the charts brilliant. . . I would wake in the process of listening, where nothing existed but particular gorgeous passages of iterative chromatic scales and punctuations of sounds coming from the music. And I was mostly in awe that anyone could physically play it, let alone compose it.

    Anyway, the reason I'm commenting on the music and what you paint as a result of your listening is because I often wondered how I would paint it -- as if I were the pianist interpreting a set piece (what are the elements I'm hearing and seeing). And there are some things that stood out.

    There is a whole lot of chromatic sliding up and down scales -- really fast finger work. Flourishes. And there is pacing. In other words, there are segments each with a certain, distinct character.

    And while your painting is nice, with pleasing colors and swirls and such, I'm thinking that the Maestro may have more to say to you if you listen more actively, and if you will, take dictation from him where he will show you some shape or transformation, more than a 'la dee dah, yum ta dum' humming along to a melody.

    Right now, your painting's sort of like a man or woman in a ballroom by themselves, holding out their arms as if with an imagined partner, and sort of taking a few turns -- imagining the music in their head. . . and an imaginary partner. Sort of swirl, swirl, swirl. . . with that kind of depth and influence from the music -- ie. not a lot. It's more about where they went with it and not so much about listening to the music, rather it might be considered more about the romantic social thing that the music plays a much smaller role, if that makes sense.

    A different way to approach it might be as a musician where you're really hearing what's going on where you have to play it -- where you're conscious of the stuff of it. I think that angle on listening to music as if you're having to reproduce what is happening might yield a whole lot more visual possibilities.

    When I started learning guitar, all that radio music I had heard for decades, which had more or less gotten really empty background noise, it suddenly came to life in a huge way when I had to reproduce and analyze what they were doing. It was way more complex than I had ever imagined. Some ore than others, granted. But it became more than alive to me when I became more active with it. It became compelling owing to an understanding that went way beyond what it had been to me. Treasures opened up.

    So while what you're doing is fine as one painting, I think it's sort of like, for me as viewer, watching someone else get mellow like they're 3 glasses ahead. I can look at it and appreciate that you must have had a good time.

    Hope this makes sense.

    It's a good painting. I am speaking more to how you might shift gears. Go deeper? Easy to say, I know. But. . .

    Last edited by D Akey; 08-29-2015 at 02:28 AM.
    "Not a bit is wasted and the best is yet to come. . ." -- remembered from a dream

  4. #4
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    Dec 2006
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    Enjoying your work. Have you experimented with the gloop pen? Especially experimenting with the settings using the Blend Mode in the different mode settings? You use a lot of great colors and you might be interested in seeing what you get when using the various blend modes.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by damasocl View Post
    Great job!
    As always your personal style!!!
    thank you damasocl...glad you like it.

    Quote Originally Posted by D Akey View Post
    I wonder. . .

    How you might interpret all of the piano nocturnes. I've listened to them over and over in awe. In fact, I would put the Nocturne collection on and fall asleep to it as I would nap -- thus slipping in and out of consciousness and hearing this section and that. -- All piano. . . and what piano! Off the charts brilliant. . . I would wake in the process of listening, where nothing existed but particular gorgeous passages of iterative chromatic scales and punctuations of sounds coming from the music. And I was mostly in awe that anyone could physically play it, let alone compose it.

    Anyway, the reason I'm commenting on the music and what you paint as a result of your listening is because I often wondered how I would paint it -- as if I were the pianist interpreting a set piece (what are the elements I'm hearing and seeing). And there are some things that stood out.

    There is a whole lot of chromatic sliding up and down scales -- really fast finger work. Flourishes. And there is pacing. In other words, there are segments each with a certain, distinct character.

    And while your painting is nice, with pleasing colors and swirls and such, I'm thinking that the Maestro may have more to say to you if you listen more actively, and if you will, take dictation from him where he will show you some shape or transformation, more than a 'la dee dah, yum ta dum' humming along to a melody.

    Right now, your painting's sort of like a man or woman in a ballroom by themselves, holding out their arms as if with an imagined partner, and sort of taking a few turns -- imagining the music in their head. . . and an imaginary partner. Sort of swirl, swirl, swirl. . . with that kind of depth and influence from the music -- ie. not a lot. It's more about where they went with it and not so much about listening to the music, rather it might be considered more about the romantic social thing that the music plays a much smaller role, if that makes sense.

    A different way to approach it might be as a musician where you're really hearing what's going on where you have to play it -- where you're conscious of the stuff of it. I think that angle on listening to music as if you're having to reproduce what is happening might yield a whole lot more visual possibilities.

    When I started learning guitar, all that radio music I had heard for decades, which had more or less gotten really empty background noise, it suddenly came to life in a huge way when I had to reproduce and analyze what they were doing. It was way more complex than I had ever imagined. Some ore than others, granted. But it became more than alive to me when I became more active with it. It became compelling owing to an understanding that went way beyond what it had been to me. Treasures opened up.

    So while what you're doing is fine as one painting, I think it's sort of like, for me as viewer, watching someone else get mellow like they're 3 glasses ahead. I can look at it and appreciate that you must have had a good time.

    Hope this makes sense.

    It's a good painting. I am speaking more to how you might shift gears. Go deeper? Easy to say, I know. But. . .

    what an incredible comment dear DAkey, I am a bit caught up in the swirl right now, like someone who could barely walk suddenly and dance and twirl.. but even at that I have glimpsed that some structure would add a depth to the whole effort. I am not a musician but can appreciate your comparative analysis , thank you so much for taking the time to write this.

    Quote Originally Posted by Bobbi View Post
    Enjoying your work. Have you experimented with the gloop pen? Especially experimenting with the settings using the Blend Mode in the different mode settings? You use a lot of great colors and you might be interested in seeing what you get when using the various blend modes.
    Bobbi, I tried the gloop pen a little but lost interest, but I shall work with it more at your suggestion... and thanks for that!..

  6. #6
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    Gary, Gary, just do not know what to say anymore, I LOVE THIS ONE SO MUCH, I can see this on the wall, fantastic, so glad I didn't miss this masterpiece

  7. #7
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    Gary, such beautiful colours, textures and shapes that are all just floating and swirling

  8. #8
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    May 2011
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    Matthews , NC
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    There is a rhythm

    In the line and colors. It seems to be very complete in itself. Like the whole of it is there. Hard to explain but I like it and I think Chopin would too!

  9. #9
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    Quote Originally Posted by pat1940 View Post
    Gary, Gary, just do not know what to say anymore, I LOVE THIS ONE SO MUCH, I can see this on the wall, fantastic, so glad I didn't miss this masterpiece
    Pat you make me smile, I am very pleased you like this one so much!..

    Quote Originally Posted by justjean View Post
    Gary, such beautiful colours, textures and shapes that are all just floating and swirling
    Thank you justjean that was how the music spoke to me and the colors had that muted quality.

    Quote Originally Posted by Marilyn Anne View Post
    In the line and colors. It seems to be very complete in itself. Like the whole of it is there. Hard to explain but I like it and I think Chopin would too!
    dear Marilyn Anne, you could not have said anything that means more to me, I totally understand what you mean and that means this painting was successful.

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