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Thread: A Few Questions

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Feb 2015
    Posts
    5

    A Few Questions

    Hi,

    I have a few questions. I have the demo version. Thank you for your help in advance.

    1. When you save an ArtRage file for printing, when your goal is creating a quality high resolution image on paper, how should I save the file, ie. TIFF, EPS, JPG, PDF (I don't even know if all of these file types are available in ArtRage)?

    2. Can I bring an image from my computer and make it part of my art canvas, and if so, can I use the dropper to sample the color?

    3. What do I tell people that I have created? Lets say I create a beautiful oil painting. What do I tell people that I made, an oil painting, a software oil painting, what is ArtRage art called?

    Thank you

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Nov 2013
    Location
    Auckland, NZ
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    Quote Originally Posted by Punkin View Post
    1. When you save an ArtRage file for printing, when your goal is creating a quality high resolution image on paper, how should I save the file, ie. TIFF, EPS, JPG, PDF (I don't even know if all of these file types are available in ArtRage)?
    The demo can only export as JPEG.The ArtRage file format is PTG, which is high quality, but can't be read by other programs.

    • If you can print straight from ArtRage on your computer, just save it as a PTG (normal ArtRage File > Save).
    • If you are editing in another program, or printing from a computer without ArtRage, or uploading it to a printing site, export it as the JPEG (in the demo).


    If you have the full version, you can choose from BMP, JPEG, PNG, PSD, TIFF and GIF.


    • PNG and TIFF are the best file types for further editing and printing. PNG is probably the commonest and most flexible.
    • PSD is high quality and preserves the layers, but requires Photoshop or a similar program (e.g. GIMP) to open.
    • JPEG (or JPG) is fine if you don't intend to edit any further. It's the commonest camera photo file, and understood by almost all programs, and will usually have the smallest file size However, editing 'damages' the image quality. (Note: you can change the export quality - and file size - of JPEG files by going to Edit >ArtRage Preferences > Advanced Preferences)
    • GIF is for websafe images, animations and other very low quality files. It can only save a few colours.
    • BMP is an old file type that will work fine, but is pretty out dated now and has a huge file size.




    Quote Originally Posted by Punkin View Post
    2. Can I bring an image from my computer and make it part of my art canvas, and if so, can I use the dropper to sample the color?
    Yes! There are multiple ways to add an image from your computer.

    It sounds like you want to Import your image. This will add it as, basically, a single layer of flat thick paint. It can then be manipulated and sampled in all the same ways as the rest of your painting.

    • If you go to File > Import Image File it will create a new painting with that image as the base layer.
    • File > Import Image File as Layer will add the image as a new layer on your existing painting.
    • You can also open a painting in another program and copy and paste it into a layer.



    Other options available are References and Tracing Images.

    You'd have two menu pods over the colour wheel on the right called 'Tracing' and 'Refs'. Tracing adds an image as an overlay on your painting. You can then set your brush to automatically use the same colours as the image, or convert it to a paint layer. References are pinned at the side of your canvas, and you can sample colours from them.


    Quote Originally Posted by Punkin View Post
    3. What do I tell people that I have created? Lets say I create a beautiful oil painting. What do I tell people that I made, an oil painting, a software oil painting, what is ArtRage art called?
    This... is a matter of great debate There is no one correct term. 'Digital painting' is the most common catchall phrase.
    Ambient Design Tech Support & Community Manager

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    Go forth and read the tutorials. Also, check out the featured artists!

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Feb 2015
    Posts
    5
    Thanks for your detailed response.

    I can't wait till I fully know how to use this program. Your answers indicate I will be able to do what I want to do, and that is exciting.

    It's funny that the terminology (oil painting or digital oil painting) is subject to debate. Technology moves faster than the dictionary!

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Posts
    939
    If I might just add to Hanna's detailed answer too…
    If your goal is to see your paintings printed and brought into the "real" world then now is the time to start getting to grips with Print Resolution and Colours.
    AR's default resolution is 72ppi this looks fine on a computer but will most likely not print well regardless of which file type you save to.
    Try and get into the habit of setting up a new canvas by going to File > New Painting…
    In the window that opens click on the Print Size tab where you can enter the dimensions you want the finished image to be. Then enter the resolution that you require in the box next to; Pixels / Inch.
    Also in this window you can choose the canvas texture you want to paint on.

    So what ppi?
    There are many, many variables that can influence this choice but as a loose rule of thumb be thinking in the area of between 200 and 300ppi for good print resaults.
    Note; large canvas + late ppi = a lot of work for your computer and things can start to slow down and get very "laggy"!
    Personally I tend to work at A4 or A3 @ 300ppi. Above A3 on my computer and the amount of lag starts to get too much at times with some of AR's tools.
    And what colours?
    Well, whatever takes your fancy really!
    But remember a computer screen can give you many more vibrant colours to play with than some print process can reproduce and those zingy colours of your original painting may turn out slightly dull and/or shifted when printed which is maybe something to bear in mind.

    For some more detailed explanations of these things Tutor Tanith has some good general information on getting digital art into the real world, on her website here: http://www.tutortanith.com/index.htm

    I hope this additional info will also be useful to you if not now then further down the road
    Last edited by markw; 03-04-2015 at 12:41 AM.
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  5. #5
    Join Date
    Nov 2013
    Location
    Auckland, NZ
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    Or, on the flipside, do what I do and completely ignore the 'physical dimensions' bit, and just make sure you're using a big enough pixel size (you can't save large works in the demo, of course).

    Pixel size is the actual image size. DPI/PPI and the 'printed inches' are respectively, instructions to the printer and an estimate based on said instruction and the pixel size. If you told the printer to print at '10 inches wide' it would fit all the pixels into that space and therefore calculate its own DPI. The important number here is the number of pixels. Everything else comes from that.

    You can always mess around with DPI afterwards, as long as you have enough pixels to mess with. You can't really go back and double the pixel size. Get a basic idea of how large you should be working, or just work at 'as large as your computer is happy with'. I've printed 5000 pixel works at A2 and they've been fine.


    (This is a huge pet peeve of mine, when people talk about having a '30 inch at 200 DPI image file' and I have to work backwards to find out how big it actually is. Why mess with two numbers when you could just go straight to the pixel size?

    The other problem with using the print size is that it's an estimate. It's the most conservative, high quality estimate based on printing photographs - which do have fairly established guidelines. ArtRage paintings tend to have shading and mess and soft edges. They have a lot more leeway than a sharp edged photograph of carefully defined pixels.

    And DPI has less effect the further back you are from the image. So the bigger the final print, the less DPI you realistically need - unless you really intend to view the canvas from a distance of a handspan. I used to happily 'fudge' my numbers to get past printing sites, and they always came out fine.

    Disclaimer: the degree of fudging possible will vary depending on what you're trying to do and what you artwork actually looks like)
    Ambient Design Tech Support & Community Manager

    This is not my signature.

    Go forth and read the tutorials. Also, check out the featured artists!

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Feb 2015
    Posts
    5
    Thank you both markw and Hannah for your responses. I read them both and will have to read them both a couple of times to precisely understand them, but yes, the topic of pixels and DPI/PPI is very important to me because I want to make high quality prints of my work, so I will be studying your answers in the coming days so that when I am ready to print, I have the best possible outcome.

    What a great and supportive community this is, one of the best!! Thank you both.

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