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  1. #121
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    Jan 2015
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    Jharkhand, India
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    Absolutely basic tips, thanks sir for it. Shall try to incorporate them as I understand the concepts gradually. Shall look forward to more of these tips as and when from you.

  2. #122
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    Forests, again. Worked through layers, suggestions please.
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  3. #123
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
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    24,587
    Looks really nice. I can see you're incorporating many principles to good effect.

    One thing to be careful of though is creating optical illusions. In your foreground red leafed tree, the trunk and branches look like they belong to that tree, but in fact they lead to a green tree that's farther back than the red. Thus, there is either no trunk for the red, or it jumped to the further tree part of the way up. I can also see some other overlapping issues where something closer goes behind something farther back. Look through it and you'll see.

    That's a minor fix if you care to adjust it. You had so many things in your head when you were painting it was merely a small detail that got away from you. Happens to all of us where parts of our paintings become invisible and when we spot them with a fresh eye, you suddenly see it. One of the reasons for that is that we get focused on the work we're doing at that moment and the rest becomes complete in our mind so we just don't see it all.

    Artists try all kinds of things to see their work in a different way just for that fresh look at their own work and spot those kinds of inconsistencies. They look at their work in a mirror, or set it aside and come back to look at it a couple weeks later. Or even if you're lucky, you have someone you can show it to who will point it out like a wife or the gardener. . . or online here.

    Anyway, you're really getting a handle on this phase of your development. Good job!

    "Not a bit is wasted and the best is yet to come. . ." -- remembered from a dream

  4. #124
    Join Date
    May 2007
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    Rome (Italy)
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    24,186
    What an improvement! The same genre but a sensibly more effective outcome, decidedly more impressive. Thumbs up!
    Panta rei (everything flows)!

  5. #125
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    Jan 2015
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    Jharkhand, India
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    Thanks all of you for your encouragement. At least I'm learning! Long way to go, as I can see.

  6. #126
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    Jan 2015
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    Jharkhand, India
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    Green valley, worked again in layers, this time more confidently,for comments and suggestions please.
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  7. #127
    Join Date
    Apr 2015
    Location
    Maryland, US
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    Is your foreground and midground on separate layers in this most recent painting? There seems to be a lack of space between the two areas. The values, saturation, and colors of the midground trees (their leaves at least) are the same as the foreground trees (the ones in detail). The midground trees look smaller but don't have the other clues to tell me they are further away.

    I'd put a layer between the two and brush in some light blue over the midground trees and set that layer to soft light to get an idea of how the midground could be pushed back (you can adjust the opacity of that layer to make it a bit more transparent if it's too intense). That should give a nice feeling of space between foreground and midground.

    That is the what of the issues here, the WHY is because the air between the foreground and midground will be getting light from the sun and sky, thereby lightening everything we see between it and that which is closest to us. There are a few areas in the world that don't get much of this (where the air is significantly thinner) but for the most part this kind of effect happens consistently throughout the world.

    Good luck, keep up the great work! You are learning a lot I can tell from all of this, and quickly too.
    Last edited by Delofasht; 04-27-2015 at 08:11 AM.

  8. #128
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    Jan 2015
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    Jharkhand, India
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    Quote Originally Posted by Delofasht View Post
    Is your foreground and midground on separate layers in this most recent painting? There seems to be a lack of space between the two areas. The values, saturation, and colors of the midground trees (their leaves at least) are the same as the foreground trees (the ones in detail). The midground trees look smaller but don't have the other clues to tell me they are further away.

    I'd put a layer between the two and brush in some light blue over the midground trees and set that layer to soft light to get an idea of how the midground could be pushed back (you can adjust the opacity of that layer to make it a bit more transparent if it's too intense). That should give a nice feeling of space between foreground and midground.

    That is the what of the issues here, the WHY is because the air between the foreground and midground will be getting light from the sun and sky, thereby lightening everything we see between it and that which is closest to us. There are a few areas in the world that don't get much of this (where the air is significantly thinner) but for the most part this kind of effect happens consistently throughout the world.

    Good luck, keep up the great work! You are learning a lot I can tell from all of this I can tell, and quickly too.
    Thanks for the suggestions. Looks like I need to work more carefully on the mid ground which slips forward every time. Thanks again, look forward to more tips in future.

  9. #129
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    Apr 2015
    Location
    Maryland, US
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    Just wanted to share what the little changes I suggest would do for your painting. First I desaturated the entire thing using a layer filled with black and set to color blending mode (this gives me a quick way to toggle on or off the saturation and see how the changes are going to look in values). Next I fill a layer set to soft light and fill it with light blue and erase out everything I want to keep saturated and darker in value, lastly I do the same on a saturation layer filled with the approximately something that's appears to be appropriately in the midground and isn't fighting for the same level of attention as the foreground elements. This is all about developing an eye for this kind of thing as there isn't really a formula for knowing when the difference is about right. We can notice that the values of the flowering orange blooms on the foreground tree are still appearing as though they are in the same area as the midground but the saturation of those flowers is much more so than the mid or background and so still pushes them forward.

    This is nice because it can show what I'm suggesting without having to try to explain quite so much. I hope it's useful (and I'm going to be posting an update to my current WIP soon to show how I still need to consider much of this on my own work, so don't worry I'm still learning much myself ). Good luck and keep up the good work. Really lovely paintings you are doing!

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  10. #130
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    Jan 2015
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    Jharkhand, India
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    Thanks, sir for the elaborate procedure and demo. Good learning for me.

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