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Thread: How are you making use of gridlines?

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
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    Canberra, Australia
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    How are you making use of gridlines?

    First, thanks Artrage team for the awesome 4.5 updates.

    I was interested to see the addition of a grid. Now I'm wondering how artists are making use of the grid, apart from using it to draw freehand from a reference. (I prefer to trace -- an advantage of digital art. But of course it depends on the look you want and how you achieve your drawing zen...)

    I've noticed that many digital artists make use of perspective lines rather than simple grids, for example this artist, who has shared his/her process. I can't quite work out what the different colours of grid represent, and how each has been used... I think the red is to do with the viewer's perspective, the blue to do with a light source (?) and the purple... Well, I'm not sure exactly. But obviously these lines have been used to help paint the building structure above. Is anyone using this kind of gridline in order to achieve the realistic/fantasy look depicted here? If so, can you tell me how this artist has made use of each colour grid?

    Also, how are you using these non-2d perspective gridlines in Artrage? The best I can come up with is perhaps to keep some grid images in a folder somewhere, import to trace, then convert them to paint in their own (temporary) layer, then use the perspective>transform tool to get them looking how you want.

    In short, asking for tips here rather than sharing any.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
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    Wisconsin, USA
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    I have been using the grid with the "snap to grid" feature for making tiled backgrounds. I can get a precise 45 degree angle this way. I make a small tile using the Symmetry tool set at 8 divisions, then save it and load it back in the using the fill tool's pattern fill. With the 45 degree angle I get the more pleasing pattern that is more diamond shaped rather then straight up and down and side to side rows.

    I also use the grid for aligning objects and stencils.
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    Aunt Betsy

    My Zazzle store:
    Aunt Betsy's Celebration Art

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by Aunt_Betsy View Post
    I have been using the grid with the "snap to grid" feature for making tiled backgrounds. I can get a precise 45 degree angle this way. I make a small tile using the Symmetry tool set at 8 divisions, then save it and load it back in the using the fill tool's pattern fill. With the 45 degree angle I get the more pleasing pattern that is more diamond shaped rather then straight up and down and side to side rows.

    I also use the grid for aligning objects and stencils.
    That's cool -- are you able to get a repeatable pattern like this?

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jun 2007
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    302
    That is a very beautiful pattern!

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Slap Happy Larry View Post
    That's cool -- are you able to get a repeatable pattern like this?
    Yes, if you make your tile with the symmetry tool. I'm using 8 sections to make sure that I get completely repeatable seamless tile that will work well on the diagonal.

    When I go to fill in the pattern I have the snap to grid function on and I click on the center of the grid and drag the cursor out a little at a 45 degree angle. If the "Lock Scale" function is unchecked, how far you drag the cursor out will determine how large you pattern is.

    I have been using my own stickers in the sticker sprayer to make my seamless tiles, it's a quick way to make a tile with lots of dimension because of the shadow settings and 3D effects that stickers can have.

    The pattern fill is lots of fun to play with. I have tried all kinds of objects to see what it would look like as a pattern.
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    Aunt Betsy

    My Zazzle store:
    Aunt Betsy's Celebration Art

  6. #6
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    Lynda.com author, Digital Tutors instructor
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    Ahhh, you are so talented Aunt_Betsy!

    ArtRage4.5.9 MACPRO (El Capitan), Wacom Cintiq 13HD, iPad3, Note 4, Wacom Intous & Nomad Brush Compose.
    ArtRage Courses: Intro to AR, Materials in AR, Portraits in AR (http://tinyurl.com/j6cyvwx)



  7. #7
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    Aug 2007
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    Quote Originally Posted by jmac View Post
    That is a very beautiful pattern!
    Thank you jmac!


    Quote Originally Posted by Victor Osaka View Post
    Ahhh, you are so talented Aunt_Betsy!
    Thank you Victor! Actually it is all about the tools. I am highly mechanically inclined by nature so for me it is about trying to figure out how to exploit the tool. I especially like to stack tool effects. In the pattern below I used:

    1. The ink pen with smoothing and the Symmetry tool to create a simple shape.
    2. I used the “select layer content" from the Edit menu to confine the shape.
    3. Using the metallic paint setting for the glitter tool I filled the shape and then used blur setting on the Pallet knife to create a shiny shape. I go over the shape with the ink pen set at the color I want with the metallic set at 100%.
    4. I then used the ink pen again to change the color of the tips of the shape to white. For white I reduce the metallic paint to about 50%.
    5. I loaded this shape as a sticker.
    6. I used this sticker with the sticker sprayer to create a tile using the Symmetry tool.
    7. I loaded this tile into the pattern fill and used the grid and snap to grid function to create this pattern.

    So you see it really isn’t about artistic talent. It is more about an apparition for the very powerful tools that are available in ArtRage and a willingness to play with the tools to see what they can do.
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    Last edited by Aunt_Betsy; 10-25-2014 at 10:46 AM.
    Aunt Betsy

    My Zazzle store:
    Aunt Betsy's Celebration Art

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
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    3,818
    You have really got the grid, stickers and symmetry tools working brilliantly Aunt Betsy. Fantastic!

  9. #9
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    Aug 2007
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    Quote Originally Posted by copespeak View Post
    You have really got the grid, stickers and symmetry tools working brilliantly Aunt Betsy. Fantastic!
    Thanks Robyn,

    I really enjoy playing with the tools in ArtRage when they come out with a new one.
    Aunt Betsy

    My Zazzle store:
    Aunt Betsy's Celebration Art

  10. #10
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    Lynda.com author, Digital Tutors instructor
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    Hey, figuring it out IS a big talent!

    I used to do a lot of machine embroidery and your technique reminds me of that sort of work. Something very, very pleasing about your pieces.

    Do you have a video showing your technique?

    ArtRage4.5.9 MACPRO (El Capitan), Wacom Cintiq 13HD, iPad3, Note 4, Wacom Intous & Nomad Brush Compose.
    ArtRage Courses: Intro to AR, Materials in AR, Portraits in AR (http://tinyurl.com/j6cyvwx)



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