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Thread: Favorite artists

  1. #21
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    The name of the guy that I couldn't remember

    I remembered what I couldn't remember before. His name was Eugene Von Blass. He painted this:
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    Not being able to remember was driving me crazier
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    The last time I kept an open mind,
    my brain fell out and the dog grabbed it.
    Now it's full of dirt, toothmarks, and dog slobber.
    No more open minds or dogs for me.www.gms9810.com/

  2. #22
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  3. #23
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    'Hopper', Some thought 'Simple'but delivered one hell of a punch of reality'....

    Ken, Great thread by the way......

    I always admired the american urban life being portrayed in Edward Hopper paintings,
    pensive and enigmatic in his interpretation of the times he lived in, yet one can see and
    associate some of those interpretations of the past today...and sometimes in our
    own lifes as well.....His 'in the county and small town' portrayals offered a sense of calm, almost
    soothing perception of something or somewhere to escape to, for him or a suggestion for all
    of us.

    Robert Hughes wrote , Hopper..."offers slices of an insoluble life, moments in a narrative that can have no closure"
    Others had different opinions in they're critiques, but the test of time, at least to me has proven they're writings to be meaningless.

    I have many more artist that I enjoy, but sense Ken started this thread with 'American life'....Hopper came to mind.

    I have really enjoyed reading this great thread, and looking up everyone's 'Favs'...
    Take care all,
    Steve
    Last edited by stevemawmv; 06-13-2014 at 07:33 AM. Reason: Just another mind growing old....

  4. #24
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    Great artist, George. I would see this kind of painting infrequently, so I thought there was only a few of them painted in this style, but when I visited Paris and took in the museums, there was a lively movement for this kind of realism. It was the classical academic style that the French Académie des Beaux-Arts (the group wanting to keep the standards of art up on a certain realistic level) was plugging, and that the Impressionists were rejecting mostly I think because they were being rejected (a political thing). I may have my details wrong but at the time there was definite tension. They may have loosened their criteria after these avant-garde maverick styles were bringing so much notoriety to France. And there was no holding things back after a point.

    But Paris is filled with this kind of painting and it would probably blow your mind as it did mine. I mean these reductions tighten up when reduced and everything looks really perfect -- well when full size, many if not all of them were as good as the reduction. Gorgeous technique. I loved it all the more because I was an illustrator and painting like this was right up my alley. And these guys represented to me the best of the best for what they were doing.

    https://www.google.com/?gws_rd=ssl#q...mie+Beaus+Arts
    Last edited by D Akey; 06-13-2014 at 08:17 AM.
    "Not a bit is wasted and the best is yet to come. . ." -- remembered from a dream

  5. #25
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    Steve, Hopper was a very intriguing painter of 'moments'. I was hooked by him when I first started studying Art (and not just playing around with it). I was lucky enough to have a teacher who thought highly of him. So I checked him out. I was most intrigued by his having taken on the lifestyle he had -- the life of a painter, no matter what or where, intrinsically interesting or not, he painted.

    I have to say I really envy you guys who are just sort of getting into all this with a fresh appetite. It's one of the greatest relaxed treasure hunts available by and to man. And nowadays with the internet it's all there to see and what makes it all the more civilized, it's organized to boot. I still forage around to see what's out there and even though I do it quite a bit, I still find new stuff that excites me all the time.

    It's like sailing along the art coast line rather like navigating the fiords in Norway, only to find they are actually fractals like the old Mandelbrot set, and the closer you get to the shore, the more there is yet at the same distance away. Kaleidoscopic. And the only way to really land your vessel is to paint or draw your own harbor into tangible being as done by the famous explorer, Cadmium the Red who was more interested in the brush and pencil than the torch and sword.

    Booty for EVERYBODY!!!!!!!!!!!
    "Not a bit is wasted and the best is yet to come. . ." -- remembered from a dream

  6. #26
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    One of my most favorite automotive (cars & hot rods) artist is Tom Fitz. His work is frequently in many of the Americanhot rod magazines. I just love his loose style of painting....

    His website...
    http://www.fritzart.com/

    Some of his art work
    Hot Rods
    http://www.fritzart.com/gallery.php?..._rod_originals


    Other paintings
    http://www.fritzart.com/gallery.php?which=other_artwork

    If I could ever achieve 1/10 of his skill I would consider myself fortunate...

  7. #27
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    Well, he definitely has a head start in front of you. The good news is you can copy his ideas and tricks, so he's like the lead car in the race and you're trailing, letting him run before making your move.

    Listen, you'll do very well at it, I've no doubt. His style is straight forward, realistic. All those things he's doing are very learn-able, and not that over the top with interpretations. He paints like an illustrator (a good thing, speaking as an illustrator). Many illustrators went into gallery work when the illustration market dried up. There's always a market for well painted images of things we hold dear. Clearly he's done lots of study and practice and has absorbed a lot of other people's chops. It's the way it all works that we learn from observation, getting ideas from this artist and that. And your move into 3D has the potential to rocket you into keeping pace with him and people who paint like that. Only your stuff may take on a different look as a result of the use of 3D rendering.

    He's good at composition, but he's going with tried and true compositions. He's using them probably because they continue to work as a way to really show off the lines on a vehicle and imply speed and all that. It makes then sizzle.

    So based on where your interests at this point in time seem to be, I would recommend, if you're doing cars, copying his staging and exploring how poses and perspective really make transportation vehicles dynamic and exciting. After that, there are lots of little painter's tricks that play to that effect. He's good at what he does, for sure. As such, he's a good one to begin pulling from for your own work.

    Go Kenmo Go Go Go!!!!
    "Not a bit is wasted and the best is yet to come. . ." -- remembered from a dream

  8. #28
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    While we're on the topic, another of my favorites is Mark Crilley: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_MDJAf_Be2M. He mainly does Manga and I'm not into that but when he does 'serious' art he's awesome.

    The last time I kept an open mind,
    my brain fell out and the dog grabbed it.
    Now it's full of dirt, toothmarks, and dog slobber.
    No more open minds or dogs for me.www.gms9810.com/

  9. #29
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gms9810 View Post
    I remembered what I couldn't remember before. His name was Eugene Von Blass. He painted this:
    Not being able to remember was driving me crazier
    Oh thanks gms, I was wondering too after I suggested Eugene von Guérard! Close by one word lol. Wow what a great painter von Blaas is but all 3 paintings are different in style. Interesting.

    Edit: Mark Crilley is an amazing artist, and friendly too. He's replied to a few of my comments - always makes a difference when they're "present".
    Last edited by hildee; 06-14-2014 at 10:36 AM.

  10. #30
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    Being a bit of a comic book fan I've always enjoyed the short lived comic book, "The Rocketeer" and it was mostly because of the art by Dave Stevens. I especially loved the way Dave drew The Rocketeer's girlfriend "Betty" who was influenced by the great pinup queen "Bettie Page".... Sadly Dave passed away at an early age from from hairy cell leukemia in 2008 at the age of 53...













    Wiki on Dave Stevens - http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dave_St...ath_and_legacy

    Wiki on The Rocketeer - http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rocketeer

    Authorized website for his art - http://www.davestevens.com/

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