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Thread: Favorite artists

  1. #11
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    It was a comfort to me to find out that he used a device like a camera obscura to project images on his canvas so he could trace outlines.

    The last time I kept an open mind,
    my brain fell out and the dog grabbed it.
    Now it's full of dirt, toothmarks, and dog slobber.
    No more open minds or dogs for me.www.gms9810.com/

  2. #12
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    Of course professional artists used professional tools. . . (not saying this because of you, George, but because a lot of people poo poo the idea that artists did and do and always have.) I don't know if you saw Steven B's post some months back where he linked to David Hockney's documentary giving evidence that they in fact did use these devices and lenses were a guarded trade secret. I had not seen it prior and it was one of my favorite art documentaries I have ever seen, because it took my suspicion a lot farther than I thought it could be shown to have been the case where many or most artists used lenses (and also camera obscura). Very well put together, and great sleuthing.

    It's also funny (odd and interesting) that the same kind of controversy has been happening since at least the Renaissance where Alberti (I think) had come up with, or documented a process wherein artists could use grids positioned like a screen between the artist and model with a corresponding grid on the paper for dividing up figures into segments so that it was a way to organize the sections in digestible ways for transferal. And it was also very useful for perspective of all kinds. I vaguely recall he was an architect as well.

    I once had been speaking to an illustrator teacher of mine who later became a fine artist about just that: Is it fair to use projectors? And he said sure, he could always draw the old fashioned way and plot it out and so on, but it was slower so why bother. He was a realistic painter, as opposed to someone expressionistic or someone with a lot of stylization to his images so it was reasonable to do it that way. I'll guarantee his clients only cared about the final art, whether it showed their product in the best light or not. And I saw this same artist draw without his projector in life drawing classes and he was sensational. An amazing draftsman. All those years drawing, even from projectors, teach us and hone our way of looking and composing and editing. Plus, skill is skill and the better you are as a regular artist without the assists, the more likely you are to be able to bridge any gaps in images you are joining -- changing the angles to suit what you're trying to do, etc etc.

    Commercial art is a business. And all those portrait artists, and artists who did art for clients or cities, despite the artist's special individual technique and flair, were in fact commercial artists -- Michelangelo, Vermeer, Rembrandt. . . And owing to the level of competition, I think that's where artists did everything they could to gain an edge to win commissions or do a better job -- and even to standardize the product in the context of a studio with assistants of varying levels of skill.

    These things exist in the world. So clearly the game has changed away from strict replication, though there will be those who love that, which is fine. But beyond that, when it's not so hard to copy a photograph because of mechanical aids that pretty much hand it to us on a silver platter, then it has to go on to that which moves image making to the next level -- the voice, what is being said, what people choose to include in the image, how the bits relate, color choices, etc -- things that take it out of the realm of straight photography. Creating things that were never seen before is a very viable way for a realist to go. Not the only way, but the artist probably has to push it to where there's some artistry. And I still maintain it's all about the individual's voice. But sure -- use photography as a tool. You betcha!

    ---- Having said all that, I also know that one of the things that professional comic book artists like Eisner can do is draw convincingly out of their heads. But they do it and do it and do it until they think in those terms. But a lot of them also have relied on models too when needed. And I doubt they lost any sleep over considering it cheating. It boils down to what is practical and how can you get what you want on the page. Ideally it would be out of one's imagination. But until that time, you're copying, whether photographs or drawings done by the guy you're trying to draw like. It's a developed skill.
    Last edited by D Akey; 06-03-2014 at 06:57 PM.
    "Not a bit is wasted and the best is yet to come. . ." -- remembered from a dream

  3. #13
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    D Akey - great post with some good insight...


    Comic and graphic book artist Brian Haberlin uses 3D in the creation of his art.

    http://poser.smithmicro.com/stories/BrianHaberlin.html

    How Brian used Poser to create his graphic novel Anomaly...

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=heSn6iVB__M

  4. #14
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    I'm looking for a used projector now for that purpose, and I won't feel any guilt if and when I find one. I'm torn between realistic and impressionistic style. When I first joined people asked me what I wanted to draw. Impressionism is fun, but I'm really interested in realistic painting. The problem, for now, is that I don't have the talent. I've only accomplished it twice so far. Of all the people I've seen on youtube This guy: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CLxYo5TmyO8 is the one that impresses me the most. I WANT to be one but can only barely manage the other. All I have now is the knowledge that I'm getting better. I've posted a lot on Facebook recently that I haven't posted here. Even Robyn was impressed with some of them. I'm sketching everything I can find, my little sketchbook is full of the dopiest images. I've been using a lot of graphite sticks and charcoal lately, trying some oils, some acrylics, and I got a set of chalk sticks. I also have a large assortment of markers, a set of set prismacolors and a set of hard ones. I'm trying everything. I've also decided, regardless of what 'traditional' artists say, digital art is a medium in it's own right. BTW, I saw Steve B's post and was impressed by it.
    So in a nutshell, I'm trying everything I can as many ways as I can and I'll do what works best. The only rules I follow re the ones regarding composition. So spank my but and call me Alice.

    The last time I kept an open mind,
    my brain fell out and the dog grabbed it.
    Now it's full of dirt, toothmarks, and dog slobber.
    No more open minds or dogs for me.www.gms9810.com/

  5. #15
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    "Talent" is as precise as the word "stuff". It's a generic catch all that says it's totally easy or you have to work for it depending on whether you have it or not. If you think you have no talent, but Art still pulls you like a passion, why is talent that important? Art technique can be mastered fairly mechanically. And you're going to go after it because you love it which also should take all the negative comparisons out of it, of having the right stuff or not.

    That drive will run circles around talent as a vehicle. And sooner or later talent pales compared with monster skill. And anybody with any memory cells in their head can develop skill because 90 percent or more of Art is formulaic. If it isn't at the start it soon becomes that way once the artist develops a go-to technique, which is not a bad thing, despite what all the books on genius artists say. That's just PR to sell paintings anyway.

    So when that happens, guess what, you've taken mechanical issues out of the equation because you are then doing good looking work and it then becomes about what you put onto the canvas. . . same as where the computer can take people really fast presently. The art is going to be in your imagination and creativity at that point and that has less to do with talent than people may care to think. What do you have in your head that you want to get out onto canvas? If you have developed your artistic method, you ought to be able to get what you want down fairly handily. Again, little to do with talent.

    The creative kicks and inspirations quite often come in mid-flight, where suddenly you find yourself doing something better than you had before, and you may have no idea from whence it came, but you don't want to get in the way of it. That happens from merely showing up and doing the work. And if your skills are not so good it will blow your mind anyway. And if your skills are good, the results could well blow your mind and everybody else's. Not an issue of talent per say.

    If you get the skills down, the most trivial notion of something to paint could be a masterwork.

    Go man go!
    "Not a bit is wasted and the best is yet to come. . ." -- remembered from a dream

  6. #16
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    That's a bit hard to grab onto with my brain full of mind altering drugs so I'll re read it tomorrow. One thing that I did stand out was "where suddenly you find yourself doing something better than you had before, and you may have no idea from whence it came, but you don't want to get in the way of it.. I've noticed that happening a lot lately. I sometimes won't open AR for a week or two then when I do, something that was really hard to do before is suddenly very easy. Weird but fun.

    The last time I kept an open mind,
    my brain fell out and the dog grabbed it.
    Now it's full of dirt, toothmarks, and dog slobber.
    No more open minds or dogs for me.www.gms9810.com/

  7. #17
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    By the way... STUFF is an official country folks word. If I say it to someone here they know just what I mean, that being, my collection of totally useless junk, of which we all have.

    The last time I kept an open mind,
    my brain fell out and the dog grabbed it.
    Now it's full of dirt, toothmarks, and dog slobber.
    No more open minds or dogs for me.www.gms9810.com/

  8. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by Gms9810 View Post
    There is another guy I like as much, I posted one of his paintings on facebook recently but I can't remember his name. Eugene something.
    Eugene von Guérard, Gms? He's one of my favourites too, love his Australian paintings.

  9. #19
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    Not sure, Hildee, It was a French sounding name. Anyway, along the lines of our conversation I submit this: http://www.webandtime.com/photorealistic-painting

    The last time I kept an open mind,
    my brain fell out and the dog grabbed it.
    Now it's full of dirt, toothmarks, and dog slobber.
    No more open minds or dogs for me.www.gms9810.com/

  10. #20
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    Hal Foster who created the Prince Valiant daily comic strip series that appeared in many newspapers across the globe and who also did a lot of work on the daily Edgar Rice Burroughs's Tarzan strip is one of my heroes. It is interesting to note he was born in my home of Halifax, Nova Scotia (Canada) and many locals are not even aware of this...

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hal_Foster

    Example of some of his art work...

    https://www.google.ca/search?q=hal+f...r+art&tbm=isch

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