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Thread: Believable Canvas Effect On Digital Art

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Feb 2014
    Posts
    14

    Believable Canvas Effect On Digital Art

    Hello ArtRage,

    Does anyone out there know how to put a canvas effect onto the digital artworks I make with ArtRage?
    I want to do the artwork, add the effect, then offer that as a finished product, drop shipping, even though the artwork is technically not printed onto canvas, yet.
    The canvas effect has to look believable, as if it is really looks like that, printed physically.

    Thank you for your help in advance!

    All the best to you!

    Benjamin L.M.
    ***

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Location
    UK
    Posts
    118
    Are you painting on the canvas with the textures that you desire? That's the easiest way for me - create the painting from scratch on the appropriate background, rather than add the effect later.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    NC, USA
    Posts
    2,874
    I might be a bit confused as to what you're trying to achieve here...

    By default, ArtRage starts with it's 3D light rendering activated, which means that the texture of the canvas grain and the height of thick paints can be seen (as one would expect when working traditionally, with Oils). So, as Mirithiar mentioned, you'd be painting in what would be a traditional and natural manner, with thick paint appearing to be raised, and thin paint appearing flat and adhering to the form of the canvas texture beneath it.

    However, It's not impossible to add those effects in after the fact, but getting them to look "natural" at that point could be troublesome, because the strokes of the raised paint being added should, more often then not, follow the stroke direction of the flat paint (not always the case, but it's usually more appealing). So by adding them later, you're basically creating more work for yourself. Anyway... If you decided you need to do that, I'd suggest importing the image into ArtRage as a single layer (File → Import Image File). You should then make sure the 3D light rendering is on, by using the Canvas Settings Panel (View → Canvas Settings) and making sure the Canvas Lighting option is checked on. On the same panel, select the type of canvas you'd like to have. At this point, you should see your image take on the texture of the canvases grain type. That could be all you're looking to do, but if you're aiming for more of an impasto-like oil paint effect, you'll need to do one of two things (or maybe both, it's up to you). The first option, is creating a layer beneath your image layer and applying paint to it (any color will do), using the Oil Brush, Paint Tube, Glitter tool, or the Palette knife (with it's Loading option set to 100%). Since all of those tools apply thick paint, using them will emboss the image with their own unique textures. You could then use other tools, like the Pastel Tool, to add further texture into that thick paint. The second option, is similar to the first, but you'll be working over the image layer. For this, create a new layer on top of your image layer. Then use that layers Layer menu options to set its Blend Mode to Multiply. Be sure you select pure white as your color, and then use the same tools I mentioned above, to paint over your image. Both methods pretty much do the same thing, so it's up to you which will work better in your case. I've leaned one way or the other, for different reasons in the past, but I can't recall exactly why. It probably had to do with how the paint built up or interacted. Anyhow, I've attached a couple examples of this below.

    Be sure to view them at full size, because the squished preview versions make them look horrible (so click on the "direct link" links above each image to view them in your browser (which you may also need to click on, depending on your screen resolution, to show it full size). A hassle, I know, but it's the only way to see what you'll get when printing.

    Here's three shots of the same image. The top version is the image without the lighting on. The middle version is the image with lighting on and only the canvas texture applied. The bottom version has both the canvas texture and the extra paint effects added.
    Direct Link
    Click image for larger version. 

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    This is a detail of the left ear. The top version shows the 3d lighting on, with only the canvas texture applied. The bottom version had the both the canvas texture and the added paint textures applied.
    Direct Link
    Click image for larger version. 

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    Nothing is easy to the unwilling.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Posts
    3,817
    I occasionally use Someonesane's first option. You can also choose to vary the opacity of that layer to adjust the depth of the impasto brush strokes to your liking.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Feb 2014
    Posts
    14

    Smile Thank you

    Thank you all for the knowledge, very helpful.

    Sorry for late reply, business has gotten in the way of art making.

    I'm ready to create art with ArtRage now.

    Thank you!

    Benjamin L.M.

    www.benjaminlm.com

    ***

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