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Thread: Camino

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
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    Sweden
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    538

    Camino

    Name:  camino.jpg
Views: 260
Size:  41.7 KB

    Original size 2048 x 1536. Pencil on paper + digital colour and pencil.
    My Art Blog : Pennstreck
    My Instagram: Instagram

  2. #2
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Rome (Italy)
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    24,113
    Another fantastic image. A real wonder and relief for a traveller walking through this area which looks very much like a desert.
    The light is, as always, marvellous and the drawing neat.
    The title "camino" made me curious because it sounded Italian and its meaning would be chimney (stack) and even fireplace, although in this latter case it's rather called caminetto, a derivative form of the basic root.
    Panta rei (everything flows)!

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
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    Sweden
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    the road, the track

    Thank you for your nice comment. I was just playing around with a memory from Spain where we were trekking in the hot plains and suddenly found a well next to an old stoneshed. That water was cool and refreshing after a long days walk...
    Camino = road, track
    My Art Blog : Pennstreck
    My Instagram: Instagram

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
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    22,517
    Yeah. The Italian/Spanish language difference would probably only work for Santa Claus where his "roadway" includes chimneys.

    Definitely the Spanish is road, way or highway. Out here in Southern California much is named after Spanish, whether it's El Camino Real (The King's Highway) or where streets have a Spanish surname like Pico or Sepulveda because those families were the ones, other than the Native Americans who settled the area. And of course, the townships are also frequently Spanish, like Sierra Madre and Mar Vista.

    Anyway, this arid vision in the picture could very much describe this Southern California terrain, were you to peel away the concrete that so much is covered by here nowadays.

    It's a compelling image. It's a rather simplistic as a subject that you again raised to an artistic height. It's a very interesting drawing, which could be considered basic if one were only looking at it for the subject of the lonely water spigot, but in fact the drawing is very sophisticated in the chosen genre. The ground is exquisite. Colors very smooth and keyed to a nice warm tone. And the shape of the pipe has lots of character. There's a story here that's just begging to activate the viewer's imagination, almost as an invitation to come fix the leak or look at what's just over the rise in the ground. Great ground though. And doing interesting dirt or ground is not always easy. I also think your blurring the mountain range works here. There's an animation feel to this for me. I could see characters being in this background.
    Last edited by D Akey; 11-15-2013 at 05:05 AM.
    "Not a bit is wasted and the best is yet to come. . ." -- remembered from a dream

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Dec 2009
    Location
    Huntsville, On., Canada
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    5,356
    I like this

  6. #6
    Join Date
    May 2007
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    Rome (Italy)
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    Ah, ah LOL dear Henry and D Akey, so the mystery about the title is solved then! The Spanish word camino = road, track corresponds to the Italian cammino (we have quite a number of cases where words are quite different with single and double consonants and they do sound different because a double extends reinforcing the sound). Camminare is the verb, to walk, more or less.
    Panta rei (everything flows)!

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Posts
    601
    Henry,
    How are you doing such smooth gradations in the sky? Are you using the mixer brush with watercolors? Or are you using something like the airbrush for gradations? Or perhaps you're actually using the filters for that? I noticed, for example, that the banding/ gradations of color are not perfectly horizontal from the top to the bottom. Instead, this is a slight roundedness to the gradations which is very nice.

    Great image. And a very good example of using a limited palette to good effect. Do you do a mockup in pencils first? And then do you do your color work, followed by the inking on the too top at the end (for example with the glasses and the pipe in the foreground)? Or do you work in some other order Wendell the image?
    Check out and submit to the thread on Watercolor WIPs in Artrage-- lots of good tips and conversation
    My YouTube video tutorial series- How to Paint with Watercolors in Artrage
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    My blog- art, poetry and picture books- http://www.seamlessexpression.blogspot.com/

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Location
    Sweden
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    538

    I guess I did like this...

    Quote Originally Posted by Steve B View Post
    Henry,
    How are you doing such smooth gradations in the sky? Are you using the mixer brush with watercolors? Or are you using something like the airbrush for gradations? Or perhaps you're actually using the filters for that? I noticed, for example, that the banding/ gradations of color are not perfectly horizontal from the top to the bottom. Instead, this is a slight roundedness to the gradations which is very nice.

    Great image. And a very good example of using a limited palette to good effect. Do you do a mockup in pencils first? And then do you do your color work, followed by the inking on the too top at the end (for example with the glasses and the pipe in the foreground)? Or do you work in some other order Wendell the image?
    I guess I dis like this: I filled the sky with a gradient. And probably made a transition to that gradation for it to fit where I wanted it to be. And used the airbrush on top of it (and the rest of the background). I do all penciling using a graphite HB on paper, first a sketch, then a Clean drawing on my light table, I scan it and import it to AR. No inking is made, just adjusting the brightness and contrast. I also do some editing and additions in AR using the pencils I made using the Sticker tool. All colours are added using the Pen tool and some Wet Palette Knife is used to soften the edges and such. I also used "grit spray" to add some "dirt" to the illustration. That's about it.

    And yes; it is almost always better to use a limited palette than to use all the colours there are. Almost always...

    Thank you for asking and commenting... I appreciate that!
    My Art Blog : Pennstreck
    My Instagram: Instagram

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