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Thread: Ink garden

  1. #1
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    Ink garden

    Mixed media, water-soluble ink pencil on sumi paper (approx. 6" by 8"), modified on the iPhone and mounted digitally in AR Pro ... The soft blur seems to play best large scale, well, larger than I typically work ...
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    Last edited by chinapete; 11-11-2013 at 01:25 PM. Reason: reducing size for viewing
    xiěy, n. freehand brushwork, spontaneous expression
    Artrage Gallery
    / Leaning Tree Ink Studio

  2. #2
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    Hi Pete. Pleased you've come down from the Clouds so us lessor Mortals can see your. Mums???
    . . Jainkang

  3. #3
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    Hey eighty+, those Clouds are early stage cataracts (sunglasses everywhere now) and yep, mums the word!
    xiěy, n. freehand brushwork, spontaneous expression
    Artrage Gallery
    / Leaning Tree Ink Studio

  4. #4
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    An interesting one Pete, get an implant you will be able to see great then

  5. #5
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    ok you up the back Eighty+ stop talking about the Arsenal and the great Wenger winning this year and liston now what is in front of me I think ??? where I'm pointing my finger Is the great Wall Of China built to keep out your lot Eighty+ JAINKANG
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  6. #6
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    Quote Originally Posted by justjean View Post
    An interesting one Pete, get an implant you will be able to see great then
    thanks, jean ... I like realism but I've never been a fan of hyperrealism, I've always believed that not everything in the field of vision should be treated with equal clarity and visual intensity, and now my eyesight is catching up with my tastes ... At some point as you choose what to paint you must also choose what not to paint ... You have to say no, what I see isn't all that clear, is it ... There aren't any lines in nature, just edges that meet with more or less definition ...

    ... I want to bring back a painting I posted here about a year ago -- I think I called it "Ice floes" -- because I'm wondering now whether the shadowy shape in the foreground was the result of an unconscious registering of a physical change in how I was seeing ... It's a cast shadow of some sort, and like most shadows, a negation of something ... My eyes may have been aware of a disturbance in vision, but not my mind ... In painting, I've found it useful to say "no" as much as "yes" to what's there before me ...
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    Last edited by chinapete; 11-14-2013 at 01:54 AM.
    xiěy, n. freehand brushwork, spontaneous expression
    Artrage Gallery
    / Leaning Tree Ink Studio

  7. #7
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    I quite like it Mr Pete. Sort of begs the question: What's black and white and read all over. . .
    I'm going to compare the Chinese answer to the one(s) I recall from when I was very young. Call it a cultural thing.

    But as an image, it's pretty cool.

    Wondering how dependent you are on photography. And if that once having achieved this point, if it wouldn't be a springboard for another step where it is run through the filter of the artist again and be more patterned or deliberate. Nothing wrong with this as an end point. But I was just curious if this might be like looking at the projection on the wall of the artist's mind from the Ming Dynasty or something from one of those bygone eras when brush painting was so stylized.

    Anyway, like I say, this is cool.
    Last edited by D Akey; 11-12-2013 at 07:12 AM.
    "Not a bit is wasted and the best is yet to come. . ." -- remembered from a dream

  8. #8
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    Hi D Akey, thanks ... that old schoolyard joke is a reminder that today we get our news in technicolor and without much black and white, who has time to read anything more than a caption?

    You raise good issues about filtering and patterning ... I see these as related more to digital manipulation than to photography, and I know very little about either ... Sad to say, I don't have any skills in looking at photographs ... I sort of believe a good photograph wants to conceal the technology behind it, and that this differs from painting or drawing, where technique usually is foregrounded and very much is a part of the visual excitement ... Those are simplifications, and I'll leave aside for the moment the more complex question of what can be learned from looking at reproductions of works of art, and how much of scale, texture, color, weightiness (physical presence) can reasonably be rescued in a photograph of an artwork ...

    Without sending the discussion too far off track, since you mention "culture," it's fair to say that in the realm of painting, the ancient Chinese were unique in thinking of art (here I mean ink painting) as completely integrated into and not at all separate from nature ... An ink painting of a landscape had nature as its model, the materials of the artist all were completely natural, the artist's mood was expected to be identical with natural expression, but the finished product, the painting, was recognized as something less than the real, the cultural always is smaller than the natural ...
    Last edited by chinapete; 11-12-2013 at 03:05 PM.
    xiěy, n. freehand brushwork, spontaneous expression
    Artrage Gallery
    / Leaning Tree Ink Studio

  9. #9
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    I enjoy when the two of you have these discussions, it's like I signed up for additional classes and don't have to pay for them!
    OPPS!....Busted!.... No! ....my tuition check is not in the mail!
    In reading the Replys.....'the comments, observations, explanations, philosophies and suggestions'... from them, I have learned new ways of conceptualizing my own art and getting closer to what I want my images to represent, at least it seems that way to me!
    Thanks guys!
    I like the pics!
    Steve
    Last edited by stevemawmv; 11-12-2013 at 06:56 PM. Reason: Apparently, i can't spell...Punctuation was tossed years ago!

  10. #10
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    Well, I for one love the academic environment. I like the mindset of the student -- often time it's filled with life and curiosity and idealism and energy and enthusiasm and occasionally a light heart -- all round not unlike our Mr Ploos, the madman with the sketch pad.

    I too love learning stuff, and I like talking to people who also like it. And heck, if we can't hang a shingle calling it all a classroom, what good is the Information Age.

    I love the open mind with appetite. Mr Pete also loves to talk about what he knows and I too find it fascinating because I frankly know nobody who loves China stuff like him. He's consistent with it, but by no means limited to it -- though he does go out of his way to look through rose colored lenses that like everything else on this planet were made in China.

    Kind of you to say you are enjoying it. Me too. Dig in anytime with what you're conceptualizing or zeroing in on. It helps the thinking process because you know what you want inside you. Conversation or writing's a way to surface some of that with a lot more clarity than just letting the mind wander. It helps it form.

    Besides, while I say I like student mindsets, I know good and well many people here have lived a goodly time on this planet and are experts in what it is they do, and I'm not just talking about their jobs. And all that living can be applied to doing art, you betcha. The credits just aren't transferable to one of the accredited seats of learning -- not without the coin of their realm . . . but I digress. . .
    Last edited by D Akey; 11-12-2013 at 07:15 PM.
    "Not a bit is wasted and the best is yet to come. . ." -- remembered from a dream

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