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Thread: Bangladesh inspired paintings for a story I did last year...

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Nov 2013
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    101

    Bangladesh inspired paintings for a story I did last year...

    Trying to capture the feel of Dhaka at night. I like how they turned out. Not sure if I succeeded though.

    -Chris

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  2. #2
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    Mar 2012
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    Both really interesting! I very much like the second one!

  3. #3
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    22,517
    Interesting style. Strong voice on the second one. The first one of the down shot of the street is generic But the second one is moving in to saying something specific. So a generic beginning that could be anybody's street in any city in the world to draw us into relating to it, and then showing an image of a woman who has been victimized in some way. And that brings that woman into our neighborhood and removes the distance between us and Bangladesh. And that's often useful when one is doing art in a way where we want the audience to care.

    I see an abused looking woman in a regional costume. And that implies a lot though I haven't any clue about what news story or humanitarian cause this is referring to as the source. So without you mentioning Bangladesh in the title I wouldn't see more than the apparent. And so I would see it as a comment from the artist about abuse of women in the third world, in general.

    Those are the two approaches -- on one hand the more detailed you go the more specific to a single situation it becomes (in the direction of a specific incident or portrait), while the less specific it is, the more general and universal it becomes and one is more sweeping in their comment. This does not mean that for broad concepts the art cannot be detailed and layered and fascinating as a work of art. And that's where artistry and voice can come in to play a bigger role.

    And I suppose it's the balance between the two notions is where it can vary and get interesting. Like how far can you push it, and is there a point where a specific situation has universal implications. And of course those are the images that make Pulitzer Prize winning type of photographs.

    Anyway, interesting conceptually and the stuff you're playing with is simplified down enough to make a very clear statement, despite that I don't know the instance you're communicating. I get it on a broader level.
    Last edited by D Akey; 11-10-2013 at 04:45 AM.
    "Not a bit is wasted and the best is yet to come. . ." -- remembered from a dream

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Nov 2013
    Posts
    101
    Thank for the comments! Critiques and all are valuable to me. I'm not a pro by any means. Just a self taught scribler with a love for comics and art.

    Interesting style. Strong voice on the second one. The first one of the down shot of the street is generic But the second one is moving in to saying something specific. So a generic beginning that could be anybody's street in any city in the world to draw us into relating to it, and then showing an image of a woman who has been victimized in some way. And that brings that woman into our neighborhood and removes the distance between us and Bangladesh. And that's often useful when one is doing art in a way where we want the audience to care.
    The story was a Lovecraft themed series of tales that bounced around the world. Starting with a problem related to the Ganges river, which is a hotly disputed resource, and going to several different places after that, before returning to the investigator who has become obsessed with this woman's death. I wanted to target Bangladesh because you don't see it as a setting in many comics, and because for all of HPL talking of "the eskimau" and "dark people" his stories rarely focused on them or their plight.

    I see an abused looking woman in a regional costume. And that implies a lot though I haven't any clue about what news story or humanitarian cause this is referring to as the source. So without you mentioning Bangladesh in the title I wouldn't see more than the apparent. And so I would see it as a comment from the artist about abuse of women in the third world, in general.
    Glad that much came through! The woman is a complicated character. I drew on some experiences I had in and around Dhaka for this. I visited a hospital where people were being treated for cancer and arsenicosis. Terrible stuff that's burned into my memory.

    Those are the two approaches -- on one hand the more detailed you go the more specific to a single situation it becomes (in the direction of a specific incident or portrait), while the less specific it is, the more general and universal it becomes and one is more sweeping in their comment. This does not mean that for broad concepts the art cannot be detailed and layered and fascinating as a work of art. And that's where artistry and voice can come in to play a bigger role.

    And I suppose it's the balance between the two notions is where it can vary and get interesting. Like how far can you push it, and is there a point where a specific situation has universal implications. And of course those are the images that make Pulitzer Prize winning type of photographs.

    Anyway, interesting conceptually and the stuff you're playing with is simplified down enough to make a very clear statement, despite that I don't know the instance you're communicating. I get it on a broader level.
    Thank you again for the kind words. I wanted to start with a general intro to the colors and scenes before getting into the details. The story is trying to show my take on Cthulhu - that madness spreads in almost imperceptible ways and we become comfortable with it. Which lays down a fertile field for the Old Ones return. So it's not a focuso n dark, high stakes, rituals, but a slow devolution of social norms that picks up speed when you're not looking for it.

    Cheers,

    Chris

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Nov 2013
    Posts
    101
    Some others from the series. I started this story around the time my youngest was born. I was fascinated to learn that the only colors a new born can perceive are black, white, and red. I worked on these a lot on the iPad so I can start to figure out lighting and noir style effects. Each part of the story has a simple color pallet that blends together the different values and amounts from white to black. So I started with these colors and progressed through the color wheel before coming back to them at the end after five issues. Still editing them and working on lettering. But I get to draw all the time and practice because art rage is such a great and easy tool to use!

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