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Thread: How do you fight against the learning period?

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Oct 2013
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    20

    How do you fight against the learning period?

    Hello,

    This post goes for the advance artist of the forum:

    I'm currently learning how to paint, I've been doing so for two years and I know I could have advance and do much more. But due to not to be available to realising what I've on mind or I'm coping, I don't paint as much as I should, not even close.

    The combination of this with being a person with a lazy touch(which I believe is the main problem) is frustrating, as times moves forward and I seem unaware of what I'm not doing and should do. I want to move forward, to progress, but it seem I'm stuck in the stupidest way.

    My question is, how did you pass this hard learning period? I'm sure its been hard for every one. What would you tell to some one at this stage?

    Thank you very much for your time,

    Ion
    Last edited by Zubi; 10-28-2013 at 03:51 AM.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jun 2013
    Location
    UK
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    118
    Hey there,

    I'm attempting to learn myself and really struggling, so maybe I'm not the best person to advise you but if the laziness is the main issue have you tried setting specific times to paint? So that you are always sitting down and doing something during that time - whether it's a quick and messy sketch or following a video tutorial or reading a chapter of an art book. That could get you into the habit of actually getting on with stuff (I do it for other things, like my dissertation).

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Posts
    3,818
    Not getting around to developing your skills would mean to me that you need to find your passion. When you are passionate, you want to work. Having an inquiring mind is very important too, and there is much to learn in Art Rage. Choose something that intrigues you and find out how to do it. That might spur you on to try something after that.

    Look in the Tips and Tricks section of the forum, find something interesting and work on that. Or, see some art you like and try to emulate the style. Play with the tools with no expectation of result to see what they can do.

    It IS really exciting, believe me, and you will get such a sense of achievement as your skill level rises. Good luck!

  4. #4
    To advance, you have to find your passion and reason to advance as Copespeak said.

    Find something in art you enjoy and make it your reason for doing. Even if it's just a simple reason, like making someone you love smile.

    My passions lie in Animation, but that requires study of all forms of art. How can I animate something if I'm not familiar with the real versions? So I study bits and pieces and I may have 20 years under my belt, but I would never consider myself a master. I am always a student and one of the best ways to get your passion going is being around others who enjoy it, such as this forum. Reading up on different styles, tutorials, myriads of videos of people showing how they do things can be great ways to push yourself towards excelling. I look at video tutorials, animation cells, images, different poses and when one catches my attention that is the one I practice.

    Now, having said that. If life is in the way or just plain too busy at the moment. It may become very difficult to get things sorted out. Acceptance can sometimes make a huge difference, instead of making excuses or pushing guilt on yourself try to accept that life is taking a bit of wind from your sails and don't beat yourself up if you don't draw something. Many times just allowing yourself a moment to breath can bring back the flame of passion for that which you enjoy doing.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    NC, USA
    Posts
    2,874
    Seems like most of the advice I'd offer has already been stated. However, I'd also recommend trying to surround yourself with people who share your enthusiasm for art. Whether it's a class, a group of friends, or what have you, I feel that being around people who are not only receptive to your work, but also understand your devotion to learning more about it, really helps.
    Nothing is easy to the unwilling.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Posts
    22,517
    I understand the intention of your question, but I don't know if I would look at it as a 'fight' because that word implies that a combative approach is required. Unless you feel like it is similar to doing martial arts or wrestling where you are defeating something that is opposing you.

    And I suppose that is okay if that's how you approach growing and you look at it as a way to mentally rise to the challenge. But it suggests a mindset that learning is like swimming upstream. And that's not always the case except in dire circumstances. If someone thought one is battling against Kindergarden or 6th grade, one is probably only going to see the combat and not the stuff that is freely there for the taking. And Art is an externalization of who you are inside and will reflect your world view.

    To see it as combative, it suggests that the thing one is learning doesn't want us to learn it or that we have a mental block and are battling with inner demons or something. That mind set may work for a short term lunge forward, but it's hard to sustain that intensity and still find the fun in it. I mean it can be done, but it's missing some of the good things that can sustain our growth. It's merely looking for what we expect. And that limits our vision to where we are at that time only. It's assuming the mindset of a master before there's wisdom and experience to warrant that. We're still fumbling around early on. And we don't know what the game is yet. We can't see enough of it to say the solution lies going at it the hard way, when the easy way is there. And I can see you would like to see the easy way and are asking where that is. But it isn't that straight forward. You're talking about something uniquely yours. It's your journey, your life and it's a mirror of who you are inside.

    I think Art is holding out an invitation to play at whatever level we're at. Each step of the way holds its own wonders and joys. Each discovery is a moment of celebration, of synchronization with something only slightly outside ourselves. Actually it's inside us, but it's buried, so it can be looked at as outside ourselves until we uncover it.

    There's a level of spontaneity, of happy accidents as well as structure and discipline. That's the fun of it -- finding out what works for us.

    If you want to paint like (pick an artist) the famous fantasy illustrator Frank Frazetta for example, you can look at his paintings and try to figure out how he did that. And that sorta works but only as a starting point.

    So long as you are unaware of the things he did in his life and how he got to where he could do that, it could remain mysterious like watching a really good magician who is way beyond your skill level. You could do two things with your feelings about him being able to do what he does and your not being able to do it -- you can forget the whole business and leave doing magic/art to others and admire their work and leave it at that, or you can go about learning the things he learned. . . or you can walk his (a known path) path until your path diverges based on an inner illumination or a life circumstance that will change the whole game for you. And you will only know that when it happens -- to you. You can be ready for it is all.

    Frazetta, I imagine, drew because he liked it. He probably took some drawing classes, he likely took some painting classes, clearly learned anatomy and composition and all the other things that artists can learn to get a handle on their craft. But he picked it up along the way. He wasn't always the famous illustrator.

    One thing that formed him, he got an early job doing comic strips in which he took what he was already capable of and adding to that the things he needed to draw (I think it was Li'l Abner). And with that job he drew and drew and drew almost certainly guided by the people who hired him. His battles were probably on that level -- measuring up to other people's criteria because he was a pro. And with being a pro, there are the usual insecurities and desire to establish themselves which spurs many of us on. He was already somewhat good. But new circumstances created new challenges. And that's a good thing or bad, depending if you use challenges to grow or if you leave off doing it because that isn't what you want to do with Art. Hopefully it's fun. Certainly fun collecting a paycheck doing something you like to do and getting paid to get super good.

    Anyway, after he went through all those years in the trenches taking situations from the writer and converting that into visual staging to tell the story. And with all that, he then had all the skills of being able to draw fast, dramatically staging things out of an idea. And he did it extremely well because he did it over and over for years (probably). You just get adept at something if you do it over and over.

    And in the early days would he have quit out of frustration had he known who he would ultimately become because he couldn't do it yet? I don't have a clue. But the reality was that when he was young the particulars of his being an artist had not yet materialized. But the style and skill evolved out of who he was and what he ended up doing along the way.

    It's a journey. It's not an end point. And the sooner you find the joy in where you are, the more likely you will be to take advantage of what is around you, getting in and getting your hands dirty and playing around, allowing for growing, sure, but doing your dance now in the present. Otherwise, you are living outside of the moment in time you are in and that's usually not a wise thing because it will always be stuck in your head and heart that it's what it's not. The music of art will not match what steps you're dancing to and it will feel clumsy. And then of course frustration follows and you could turn to carnal pleasures and drugs and falling in with the wrong crowd and end up in . . . . oh wait. . . that's a different movie.

    So put the time in learning bits and pieces based on what you want to do, and where you think you might be headed -- at this point in time. That could change, but believe me, one thing leads to another and another and another. Let yourself enjoy the surprise and mystery. It can be a great ride. It is a ride. And it is yours and yours alone to experience because it grows out of your unique moments.

    Good luck and have fun.
    "Not a bit is wasted and the best is yet to come. . ." -- remembered from a dream

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Oct 2013
    Posts
    20
    Hello,

    Thank you very much for the answers. I'll answer to the other post below(new responds will start on red).

    Quote Originally Posted by D Akey View Post
    I understand the intention of your question, but I don't know if I would look at it as a 'fight' because that word implies that a combative approach is required. Unless you feel like it is similar to doing martial arts or wrestling where you are defeating something that is opposing you.

    And I suppose that is okay if that's how you approach growing and you look at it as a way to mentally rise to the challenge. But it suggests a mindset that learning is like swimming upstream. And that's not always the case except in dire circumstances. If someone thought one is battling against Kindergarden or 6th grade, one is probably only going to see the combat.......

    So put the time in learning bits and pieces based on what you want to do, and where you think you might be headed -- at this point in time. That could change, but believe me, one thing leads to another and another and another. Let yourself enjoy the surprise and mystery. It can be a great ride. It is a ride. And it is yours and yours alone to experience because it grows out of your unique moments.

    Good luck and have fun.
    Hello Akey,

    I truly enjoy reading this and its been revealing, without a doubt I've been always looking at the future, seeking only the final result. As an example of this behaviour, there is this time when I mastered human anatomy enough for some of my human characters to be successful at the end of the day, and I did immediately start designing human characters, which all of them end up unfinished as I did not master colours or shadows yet, something that did frustrate me as ones again I was limited and unavailable to represent what I had on mind. As you said, living on the future and not on the present, only seeking the result and not to learn.

    I'll follow your wise advice and I'll focus on to days skills, learnings and joys. Make learn something to enjoy and not a resource toward a final goal.

    My most sincere thanks Akey, very wise words.

    To Someonesane:

    I was at private painting lessons, currently I work better on my own at home as I don't have time for the lessons due to the university high degree I'm at.

    To Mirithiar:

    That is a good idea, I'll try to set up a schedule to follow and I'm going to follow Akeys advice and try to make it something that doesn't need to have a schedule, make it be something like playing a videogame of my like. Although I wish I could pay some one to slap me on the face each time I skip it for no good reason, I think more people will pay that person too!.

    To copespeak and MagenSparks:

    Thank you very much for your opinions, I appreciate it. However I've find my self identify with Akeys words.

    Again, thank you very much to every one for coming by
    Last edited by Zubi; 10-29-2013 at 06:42 AM.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Missouri
    Posts
    864
    As for my little opinion, I'd say don't take yourself too seriously. I'm still learning, as everybody here knows, and every mistake I made drove me crazy and almost caused me to give up. A lot of what I considered mistakes weren't really mistakes at all and the real mistakes... you can see them not as mistakes but chances to learn. You can always remove the offending part and redo it. Practice as often as you can, just doodle and get familiar with the tools. Also, in my case, I find the areas that I'm weakest, in my case hair, and draw it as much as possible until I'm happy with the result.

    The last time I kept an open mind,
    my brain fell out and the dog grabbed it.
    Now it's full of dirt, toothmarks, and dog slobber.
    No more open minds or dogs for me.www.gms9810.com/

  9. #9
    Akeys does have a way with words. Regardless, I am glad you found some insight. Good luck.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Location
    belgium
    Posts
    117
    Hey ,

    ive got same problem as u , i have a lazy touch .

    But nonetheless i enjoy painting , drawing , and this forum always inspires me .
    Learned quite a lot to , i understand u want to draw from ur mind , saw ppl use lots of pictures to come to that point they had in mind .

    Many times when it comes to hands and fingers , or just the head position i cant get right , i get frustrated .
    Also id feel like cheating if id trace , but now sometimes i trace the picture and then sketch the traced picture to get the feel .

    Not saying that tracing is wrong offcourse .

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