ArtRage 5 Product PageArtRage Lite Product PageArtRage for iOS Product PageArtRage for Android Product PageArtRage  Android Oil Painter Free Product PageArtRage  Free Demos Page

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 12

Thread: what do you think of this guy?

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Missouri
    Posts
    864

    what do you think of this guy?

    I saw this guy and am wondering what other folks think of the way he does things. I know... whatever works..., still I'm curious.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Cu6JhA42uKs

    The last time I kept an open mind,
    my brain fell out and the dog grabbed it.
    Now it's full of dirt, toothmarks, and dog slobber.
    No more open minds or dogs for me.www.gms9810.com/

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Posts
    22,517
    He paints very reminiscent of Bob Ross, a now deceased (? I think) TV how-to artist, who the originators of ArtRage (the Rage Boys) watched to see what kinds of marks he made so they could emulate them on the computer in their developmental days of what marks are supposed to look like and what kinds of marks an artist would want to make. So this kind of painting should be no problem in ArtRage.

    There are a lot of amateur artists who would love to paint like this. I think part of the desire to paint like this is because he captured their imagination that they too could do that because it looked so easy -- and it is, relatively.

    To me, it's sort of a learners level. Nothing wrong with it. It's fun I would imagine. I think it's analogous to learning the 'Easy Version' of hit songs on the guitar - or playing with only chords like with campfire sing-alongs. All you need in those cases is to get close to the sound and people are going to join in for the fun of singing the hits they love. And it does give the beginning guitarist goals that are within reach or just a wee bit out of reach which keeps the frustration level down. I learned how to play guitar like that, but I outgrew it.

    With this kind of painting you're going to always paint the same kind of stuff. And it will always look a certain way. Again, nothing wrong with it as a foundation. You can learn a lot of things about composition and paint handling.

    The thing that cheapens it though is association of where one might have seen this kind of work. There used to be an enterprise called "Starving Artists" who would rent a room at a hotel or something and bring sweat shop assembly line paintings to sell for next to nothing. And these painting filled offices and so on inexpensively for years. So no matter how good one gets at this look, it will never really get out of that category. Certain people will like it. Collectors will NEVER be caught dead with one.

    A step above that, there were lots of idyllic seascapes sold around here, where the sun was setting and a wave was picking up the light as it broke -- often painted with a palette knife (because it was quick). And those pictures always worked, at least when painted by someone who knew what they were doing. There's magic in some. But it's going down the same road again and again. But they're a dime a dozen largely because it's the same over thousands and thousands of paintings -- all the same, with some minor changes. That would be like playing the hooky bits of Sunshine of Your Love or Satisfaction with a decent guitar, playing the same theme licks over and over and maybe getting in some little bit of lead work that was in the recording, but never getting freed up to improvising your own lead work and turning it into your own. It's NEARLY there and certainly a lot closer. And that's enough for some people.

    So this painter you linked to is fine for what he is. Oh, a word of caution, he didn't show his work close up, and this kind of painting reads better not showing detail, which after a time you would find a little too gimmicky and crude. But if I never had picked up a brush before, I would jump in and learn as much as a could and have some fun. And I would also be keeping myself open for the next game that was sure to be coming along very shortly.
    Last edited by D Akey; 10-13-2013 at 05:09 PM.
    "Not a bit is wasted and the best is yet to come. . ." -- remembered from a dream

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Missouri
    Posts
    864
    Yeah, those are all good points, I noticed that there were no closeups. It just seemed to me that he randomly slapped paint on a canvas and started smearing it around with a paper towel until it looked like something, which to me looks very unprofessional. It was like some schmuck playing the emperor's new clothes game. They just throw something crappy together and act like they knew exactly what they were doing and anybody that doesn't like it, obviously doesn't know art. Nobody wants to look stupid so they rave about how great it is.

    The last time I kept an open mind,
    my brain fell out and the dog grabbed it.
    Now it's full of dirt, toothmarks, and dog slobber.
    No more open minds or dogs for me.www.gms9810.com/

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Posts
    22,517
    Well, that's a little more extreme than I would go with it. It's fun for some people and that gives it value. And some people actually like that kind of painting for real -- Different strokes for different folks. It's technically professional in the sense of some money was paid, however little, for those paintings. But Art is a tough thing to nail down in any case because it is so subjective.

    For you, what I can tell from your postings, this is not your direction. You're looking to be learning a higher level of craftsmanship. And going this route would not satisfy you even as a step on the path. I've been sort of the same way along my route. I went for craftsmanship from the get go too and wanted the right teachers right off the bat. The best thing those teachers did for me was keep me inspired. The one's I liked were because they never sold the student short as to what they were able to accomplish. And when I discovered the teachers I had were not very good artists or helpful, I left them. When the teachers were good artists, I hung onto them tightly at least until I moved on.

    I still recommend that you look for artists you admire their work as something you would be proud of and set off to learn how to do it. Won't always be a class or a book or video. But you'll pull stuff in based on clarity of direction. And the right classes and books and videos will start appearing for you. You're already jumping forward with the butterfly stuff.

    Go man go!
    Last edited by D Akey; 10-14-2013 at 03:39 PM.
    "Not a bit is wasted and the best is yet to come. . ." -- remembered from a dream

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Missouri
    Posts
    864
    There are 8 or 10 artists that I follow on youtube, and I learn a lot from most of them.

    The last time I kept an open mind,
    my brain fell out and the dog grabbed it.
    Now it's full of dirt, toothmarks, and dog slobber.
    No more open minds or dogs for me.www.gms9810.com/

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    UK
    Posts
    14,943
    Thanks for the link Gms9810, I enjoyed watching and it also lead to me watching many more. Thanks again
    Sometimes...I remember better with my eyes closed

    My Gallery
    http://members.artrage.com/vb_users/6307

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Posts
    3,816
    I actually found it quite magical, and loved his gestural strokes. Such atmosphere!! I think he might have spoiled some of that one by 'mushing' areas towards the end. I kinda liked it more before. I have just watched another and am still entranced by his methods. We live in a spectacular area of West Gippsland, Victoria and I have often wondered how to be able to depict the scenery. I'm going to get a canvas out and have a go with him as inspiration. Thanks George!

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    Missouri
    Posts
    864
    well, glad to help, even though I don't care for it.

    The last time I kept an open mind,
    my brain fell out and the dog grabbed it.
    Now it's full of dirt, toothmarks, and dog slobber.
    No more open minds or dogs for me.www.gms9810.com/

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jul 2013
    Posts
    2,035
    Thanks!
    Haven't thought of Dennis in years, very prolific landscape artist, always liked how he achieved a overall warmth in his lighting and generally his paintings are dramatic, considering they are landscapes, which can be hard to achieve! I can't do it!
    If anyone is interested in his work, search 'pictures of Dennis Sheehan paintings'.
    Thanks Again!

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Posts
    22,517
    Quote Originally Posted by stevemawmv View Post
    Thanks!
    Haven't thought of Dennis in years, very prolific landscape artist, always liked how he achieved a overall warmth in his lighting and generally his paintings are dramatic, considering they are landscapes, which can be hard to achieve! I can't do it!
    If anyone is interested in his work, search 'pictures of Dennis Sheehan paintings'.
    Thanks Again!
    Gotta say in doing a search, some of his stuff looked nice at low rez screen as samples. Couldn't make out a lot of detail. But the paintings I saw from that search looked different than his demo, more complete, as if he had some decent chops, which suggests to me he modified his work to suit the level he was teaching to. So there ya go. Does that mean I like that demo any more than I did before? Not my thing. But clearly for some it fits the bill.

    Glad some folks could manage to say some nice things. I feel better.
    "Not a bit is wasted and the best is yet to come. . ." -- remembered from a dream

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •