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Thread: Teaching a student ArtRage 4 - Art of the eye

  1. #11
    Join Date
    Dec 2018
    Posts
    5
    I'm a private high school teacher and we're not allowed to use any YouTube video tutorials (only those from an official source of an accredited program or licensed copies), so I thought perhaps someone here can help me.

  2. #12
    Join Date
    Dec 2018
    Posts
    5
    Has anyone used any other accredited programs/licensed tools for teaching Creative Design class? Any resources could be helpful. Thank you.

  3. #13
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    Dayton, Ohio
    Posts
    141
    Degutis,

    You may want to look at Lynda (now LinkedIn Learning) - https://www.lynda.com/ but still not sure if it is accredited. Udemy, Lynda, and others can be powerful learning tools. There's more to being accreditation though. As a professional graphic designer working with a University Research and Science, I can say that I've learned more online through self-paced systems like Lynda, Udemy, Cineversity, and yes even YouTube training than I would have ever with an accredited school. They say that accreditation is everything, but I've learned from 30+ years of experience as a professional Graphic and Motion Designer that it isn't. I've hired artists not necessarily for their degrees but their ability to cope in a fast-paced design environment and their ability to adapt at any turn. Employers actually just want good experience, skill, work ethic and good working personality even over "accreditation". There's just so much more involved than what can be learned in school.

  4. #14
    Join Date
    Nov 2011
    Location
    Dayton, Ohio
    Posts
    141
    I'm currently working on ideas for training homeschoolers both traditional and digital art techniques, I think this is a good prodding for me to finish, I guess what I started. I'll see what I can do with some ArtRage. Though to be honest, YouTube is my GoTo for Tutorials and training and I've demonstrated techniques on what I'm working on there both digital and traditional fine art. See: https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCLY...w-5COpsszmQz5g

  5. #15
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Posts
    24,188
    Why wouldn't you teach that material yourself? Are you just compiling hand outs? Do demonstrations and talk the students through the learning. When I taught, I compiled a "Greatest Hits" from my past teachers filtered through me -- the stuff that lit me up. I had good teachers who tracked what was working for the students, but I also had "teachers" that were good artists who would just stand up and draw their own drawings and never offer anything to the students. Be a good teacher which means be interactive.

    Hand outs and having them watch movies is generally an avoidance. And putting the owe-ness onto another teacher is sort of a dodge. If you're going to other people to do your teaching for you, you might want to take a step back and rethink what your job is. Teach what you're good at. That will fill out and expand as you do it.

    You do not have to teach them every possible thing at once. Teach your lessons.
    "Not a bit is wasted and the best is yet to come. . ." -- remembered from a dream

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