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Thread: DPI and Image Size

  1. #1

    Question DPI and Image Size

    I am working on several large drawings.

    I set the Print Size to: 80.93 inches by 57.60 inches.

    I am setting the dpi to 120, then I am setting the Screen Size to: 19422px by 13824px

    I have 8gb of ram on my computer and Inter Celeron CPU B800 @ 1.50GHz 64-bit Operating System Windows 7

    So this changes the canvas size but not the painting size. So when I attempt or resize the painting to fit the canvas, I get a message that says I do not have enough memory to perform action.

    Okay fine, So I guess my question is this: dpi only matters when printing, so if I draw my image at the standard 72dpi then change it for printing to 240dpi, is there any degradation/pixelation when I increase the dpi? I would assume the size of the painting has nothing to do with the quality it is printed at. So when I increase the dpi, why does the image size decrease? I would think it would stay the same size and only the dpi would change?

    I am in the process of creating gallery images that will be printed out and displayed, so I need to make sure that I am getting the best quality I can.

    I am not good at understanding why the screen size is different than the print size, I am an artist and only understand that there is only one canvas size.

    Also, what is the difference between canvas size and painting size? Nevermind, I just answered my own question: Canvas Size only resizes the canvas and not the painting. Painting resizes both the canvas AND the painting. I think. ;p lol

    This is an amazing software and you have done a fantastic job creating it! I am only using ArtRage and no other software for my art because it suits my needs and it is capable of doing pretty much whatever I ask of it. So I am now starting to learn more about the limitations of my capabilities and the software capabilities. I have a lot of "why does this happen when I do this" type of questions, but I will create a new thread for those.

    I apologize for the jumping around in this post, just imagine what it is like in my head. lmao!
    Last edited by jeff12343; 04-21-2013 at 10:39 PM.

    My Gallery: http://members.artrage.com/vb_users/23895 - you have to login to view Mature Content
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  2. #2
    Dpi is very important in digital art.
    It means dots per inch, and it is a unit of density of information. This means that the higher the dpi, the better the print. Usual printers use 300dpi, 240 dpi and the results are very good.
    Density of information means a finite resource. If you set the dpi for a drawing it will not be able to increase detail as you scale the dpi to more later. Scaling objects up without losing info is only possible with vector formats.

    For example: if you want to get an A3 (42cm x 29.7cm) to a printer, you might need 300dpi. In pixels, this transforms to 3508 x 4961pixels. If you want that A3 format to be only displayed on a monitor, you can set the dpi to 72. the drawing will be 842 x 1191pixels. This is not good for print at all. If you want to print this file now at 300dpi (using the 842 x 1191 resolution) it will only give good results as a 7.1 x 10cm image. This is not the original A3 format.

    The important thing to understand is that digital images can be measured in 2 ways: physical size and dpi (for example: A3-42cm x 29.7cm at 300dpi) or by pixel count (for example 3508 x 4961pixels). You have to remember that quantity of information is what is being measured. Use only one of the methods, so you wont get confused. They will show the same result in the end.

    The files you are trying to get done look a little too big for me too. I have the same config as you, except the processor (q9650 at 3.00Ghz) and i have memory issues too. Maybe you can try to keep the file size down by working on 200dpi, print a test page and see if going to even 150dpi is still ok. At 150dpi your file (80.93 inches by 57.60 inches) has 12109x8640 pixels. This is really big. I think it should be enough for you prints, as nobody will observe them from as close as reading a book (where the 300dpi standard is really important). There might still be memory issues with AR, so be careful and backup your files before saving (saving can sometimes cause memory issues and you will lose work). For a lighter memory usage, press F5 to disable the lighting system (if you use Oil brush, the strokes will lose their 3D appearance, though, and the canvas will not show the texture).

    With art prints, color and tone representation is more important than dpi, so choose the printer wisely. You could print on canvas and that will add extra detail to up-close inspection.

    Good luck!
    Last edited by alexart; 04-22-2013 at 12:09 AM.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Apr 2013
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    DPI has a lot to say when you work in a bitmap program like ArtRage.. since we work in pixels. The number of "pixels" used per inch in a physical print, is by default higher than the number of pixels per inch, as you see it on a monitor, - just like alexart explains ... the size of the output @300 DPI does not fit the "size" of what you see on your screen at 100% zoom (actually this also changes a lot depending on the size of your screen, and what resolution you are running at, and the fact that some monitors is able to run above 72dpi .. but now we are getting a bit too technical I bet)
    One way to get around this problem, when doing large scale prints, is to lower the DPI (Since the work often is meant to be seen on a great distance anyway) .. or change to work in a totally different program than ArtRage, allowing to draw with vector graphics.

    By default, I do most of my work to fit a normal A4 + 3-6 mm bleed @300dpi .. this seem to work fine on my system, and still makes a good print, even if it's later scaled up to fit on a A3 size.
    (I normally work on a Phenom 9350w Quad-Core @2.00Ghz + 8gb RAM on Win7-x86 Ultimate with a dual monitor setup, and it's fine for me)

    If I know beforehand, that I'm going to need a extra crisp print in a larger scale, I'll often double the DPI half-way in the painting process, before I start on the details. This often works fine on my rig, as long as I don't have too many layers.

    Doing a piece to fit on a A1 or above @300 DPI would often be insane on a normal rig, so if I plan on doing something that large, I choose to do it at work (where I'm blessed with a totally insane rig)... or I just go vector.


    --- damn look at me go ... sorry about the ramble, I hope it makes some kind of sense.

  4. #4
    Join Date
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    By the way ... an even more interesting topic, when talking about printing artwork, is the color-conversion from RGB to CMYK ... I always export my work to Photoshop from artrage, and fix the colors in CMYK-mode, before doing a print. It would be REALLY awesome if ArtRage had a CMYK-mode too

  5. #5
    Join Date
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    Unfortunately CMYK isn't currently possible in ArtRage due to the way that colour blending and paint mixing calculations work.
    Dave
    Resident Bug-Hunter
    Ambient Design

  6. #6
    Join Date
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    Quote Originally Posted by DaveRage View Post
    Unfortunately CMYK isn't currently possible in ArtRage due to the way that colour blending and paint mixing calculations work.
    Yeah, I noticed a reply on this topic elsewhere. Well the problem is not worse, than you have to keep in mind not to use the high end of the color-spectrum for crucial details, if you plan on printing it out. I noticed problems especially in the greens, where I have to be mindful. Custom palette helps a lot

  7. #7
    http://www.northlight-images.co.uk/a..._distance.html

    Have a look at this page for details on print resolution as tied to viewing distance. Especially in the case of large format printing, this is something to have in mind as that you can easily over tax your hardware unnecessarily.

    As for CMYK and AR, from a pre-press perspective, I'd advise against going into CMYK without consulting with your separator/print vendor. Reason being that service bureaus, printers, etc. all have ways of maximizing color fidelity in their conversions. If you're doing a digital painting on glicee for example, your print is likely coming off a 6 to 8 color high fidelity inkjet with its own proprietary color management scheme. It's going to have a much wider gamut of color than standard Offset Lithography, CMYK printing. If you convert it in photoshop yourself, using the basic prepress settings, your color is going to get hammered into that reduced gamut. Better to supply your image in profiled RGB (sRGB or Adobe RGB) and then consult with your vendor about how they will handle the color and what form of proof you will be supplied.

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