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Thread: Shading practice

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
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    Missouri
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    Shading practice

    This is very simple but based on some tutorials suggested by aunt Betsy. It's very basic, but that's where I need to start. When I get shading and light right I'll work on hatching.
    Click image for larger version. 

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    I used the shader and the knife and of course, a pencil. Should I use the knife or just stick with the shader?

    The last time I kept an open mind,
    my brain fell out and the dog grabbed it.
    Now it's full of dirt, toothmarks, and dog slobber.
    No more open minds or dogs for me.www.gms9810.com/

  2. #2
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    35 views no replies. I guess that's an answer, I'll do it again.

    The last time I kept an open mind,
    my brain fell out and the dog grabbed it.
    Now it's full of dirt, toothmarks, and dog slobber.
    No more open minds or dogs for me.www.gms9810.com/

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
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    3,818
    Should I use the knife or just stick with the shader?? Looks pretty good to me, but it depends on the effect you want. Try both and see how you like it, but they're pretty good efforts....

  4. #4
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    Ok, I wasn't sure what the 'proper' way to do it was. I'm starting to realize that in some areas there is no wrong or right, just whatever works. Thanks.

    The last time I kept an open mind,
    my brain fell out and the dog grabbed it.
    Now it's full of dirt, toothmarks, and dog slobber.
    No more open minds or dogs for me.www.gms9810.com/

  5. #5
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    This video may be of interest
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OfMAgdS2SPk
    "I paint because I love to cut mats" (Arthur Alexander)

  6. #6
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    Ok, thanks. I saved it and will use it for a reference.

    The last time I kept an open mind,
    my brain fell out and the dog grabbed it.
    Now it's full of dirt, toothmarks, and dog slobber.
    No more open minds or dogs for me.www.gms9810.com/

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Wisconsin, USA
    Posts
    702
    I just so this tread, sorry I missed it when you first posted it.

    You have a really good start. It doesn't matter how you do the shading as long as you like the effect you get. Different styles of art use different styles of shading. The type of shading you do can show what type of surface the object has. Very smooth shading and bright highlights will indicate a smooth and shiny surface.

    The angle of the cast shadow (the one outside the object) will indicate where object is in relation to the surface the shadow is on and the view that you are looking at the object from. If you want to change the view of the object, change the angle and perspective of the cast shadow.

    One of the most important parts about practicing shading (I'm no expert but I understand the concepts) is to get you to look at objects and see the shading and highlights. When you can stop seeing the object whatever it is and start seeing it as a series of different light values and then drawing them wherever they are it will really help with the shading exercises. One of my teachers had us drawing from a black and white photograph that was turned upside down. It made us concentrate on the shapes and and light values instead of drawing what was in the picture. What you think you see and what is actually there is often changed by your brain, so it helps to not have a pattern the brain recognizes. When you recognize something you don't really look at it anymore so you don't really see the light values.

    Try practice shading a still life. Setup some objects with a lamp shining on them. Vases, bottles, glasses, even cans make good choices. You might want to avoid transparent and objects with over all labeling, it will just distract you for now. Still life drawing and painting is really where most art classes start. You don't want to skip that step. If you drape some cloth over something like a box and onto the table top and place objects on it in front of the box. The cloth should have folds in it going up over the box. Then you draw what you see. Shading cloth folds is a major step in shading practice. I still remember doing this in my first year of art class in high school. I even remember doing this in Junior High and doing cloth folds for the first time, it was not a very good beginning. I just put in dark areas for the folds, no highlights or gradient shading. I did much better in High School. I had been doing some drawing and shading on my own by then and my folds looked like folds and my round objects looked round.

    I was so please to see this, I was wondering how you were doing. Keep up the good work.
    Aunt Betsy

    My Zazzle store:
    Aunt Betsy's Celebration Art

  8. #8
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    Pacific Northwest
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    Gms9810- This is a good beginning. I just watched the video Juz posted and that is a good example of the effect you are studying. There is a book by artist James Gurney entitled "Color and Light" which I highly recommend. It covers a lot of ground in a well explained, digestible way. There is another book I must recommend by artist Ted Seth Jacobs entitled "Light for the Artist." He is a bit more cerebral in his written tone but I must credit his work as the source that really firmed up the foundations of my own understanding of light and it's effect on form.

    Of the two books, both of which I own and have read, I would recommend the one by James Gurney first. His imagery is fun to explore and his use and discussion of color pallets is very good material for beginning artists. That said I feel his work is useful for old hands and pros. I learned new things that added to my skills, particularly regarding the study of establishing limited color gamuts for painting in.

    Keep practicing and posting. I sometimes don't jump in and reply as much as I'd like, but I will try to be one who helps when I can.
    Be well,

    "Teach, Learn, Thrive"~DM


  9. #9
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    Just thought i'd mention that James Gurney also has his own YouTube channel
    http://www.youtube.com/user/gurneyjourney
    "I paint because I love to cut mats" (Arthur Alexander)

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
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    Missouri
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    Ok, I'll look for that on Amazon, thanks.

    The last time I kept an open mind,
    my brain fell out and the dog grabbed it.
    Now it's full of dirt, toothmarks, and dog slobber.
    No more open minds or dogs for me.www.gms9810.com/

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