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Thread: I call this one "Orange" Stage 2 added.

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
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    Chatsworth, GA USA
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    I call this one "Orange" Stage 2 added.

    Thought I would trick you all and post some more realistic art of an actual orange instead of an abstract. If you were supprised by this change of modes please say so. LOL. Hope you like it.

    Click image for larger version. 

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    Stage 2

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	Orange slices.jpg 
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ID:	72495
    Last edited by shadowslake; 01-24-2013 at 01:48 PM.

  2. #2
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    I like this very much. The contrast and complementary shapes and colours I find very pleasing. The texture also intrigues me. What tools and media did you use for this, shadowslake?

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by grayflo View Post
    I like this very much. The contrast and complementary shapes and colours I find very pleasing. The texture also intrigues me. What tools and media did you use for this, shadowslake?
    I used the pencil tool for most of it. I used the airbursh just a little and the blur knife on the edges to make them sit togather beter.

  4. #4
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    Stage 2

    Stage 2

    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	Orange slices.jpg 
Views:	41 
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ID:	72496

  5. #5
    Join Date
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    22,517
    Looks like a cool scratch at a new technique.

    Remember that the innards of an orange has anatomy too, though one can certainly choose to ignore those details anytime.
    But it adds interest to include the different bits if one chooses realism. You can look at the pulp, or zest (? the white thickness) and the natural compartments what one can usually see in the crosscut wedges.

    This drawing is cool for getting a handle on the tools. But it will likely for you be far more satisfying to look harder and analytically at your model and then evaluate how you want to handle it visually. After all, it's not like you don't see it. I'm quite sure your regular cognitive brain does. It's just that you haven't yet assimilated that part into your artist mind. It's the difference between drawing the shape of a human head without the eyes and mouth, vs with them in place.

    The less info you put in, the more the burden shifts onto other qualities of what you do present to look noteworthy and artistic. Without the anatomy, we start to evaluate by default to the composition, the colors and the technique, and/or the concept if any. And it has to be worth looking at on that level. Consider those aspects of picture making when you set out to make something you want people to look at. I realize this is a work in progress, but you may find it easier to indicate from the beginning the noteworthy elements you're going to include and their relationship one to the other. Otherwise you're relying on luck somewhat that they will balance in the end. I can only speak to what you've posted.

    Watch what appears when you open this link. You'll see the orange differently here because we made a point of it and you'll be looking for it. It's suddenly like it's part of what makes an orange an orange.

    http://www.google.com/search?num=10&....1.eFUNGt8udsE
    Last edited by D Akey; 01-24-2013 at 04:12 PM.
    "Not a bit is wasted and the best is yet to come. . ." -- remembered from a dream

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Feb 2012
    Location
    Portland, OR
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    ... nice painting, awesome critique, thanks to both of you ...
    xiěyž, n. freehand brushwork, spontaneous expression
    Artrage Gallery
    / Leaning Tree Ink Studio

  7. #7
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    Mar 2012
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    The inside of an orange is beautiful! All those section, pips and pith. Go do it!

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Apr 2012
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    Quote Originally Posted by D Akey View Post
    Looks like a cool scratch at a new technique.

    Remember that the innards of an orange has anatomy too, though one can certainly choose to ignore those details anytime.
    But it adds interest to include the different bits if one chooses realism. You can look at the pulp, or zest (? the white thickness) and the natural compartments what one can usually see in the crosscut wedges.

    This drawing is cool for getting a handle on the tools. But it will likely for you be far more satisfying to look harder and analytically at your model and then evaluate how you want to handle it visually. After all, it's not like you don't see it. I'm quite sure your regular cognitive brain does. It's just that you haven't yet assimilated that part into your artist mind. It's the difference between drawing the shape of a human head without the eyes and mouth, vs with them in place.

    The less info you put in, the more the burden shifts onto other qualities of what you do present to look noteworthy and artistic. Without the anatomy, we start to evaluate by default to the composition, the colors and the technique, and/or the concept if any. And it has to be worth looking at on that level. Consider those aspects of picture making when you set out to make something you want people to look at. I realize this is a work in progress, but you may find it easier to indicate from the beginning the noteworthy elements you're going to include and their relationship one to the other. Otherwise you're relying on luck somewhat that they will balance in the end. I can only speak to what you've posted.

    Watch what appears when you open this link. You'll see the orange differently here because we made a point of it and you'll be looking for it. It's suddenly like it's part of what makes an orange an orange.

    http://www.google.com/search?num=10&....1.eFUNGt8udsE

    I am still working on devolopeing a tecknique that will allow me to do it properly. I spent 3 hrs trying different things and did not like the results yet. I took a rest for the night and will try again tomorow. I am trying hard not to varrie to far from the tools I selected to use for this one to produce the looks I want. i know that this is a personal limition I have imposed on myself but I think I will be sucessful. I dont count yesterday as a failure. I found a few ways not to get the look I want. Let the exprementing begin again anew tomorow.

    Thank you again for taking the time to help direct me. I welcome any advice.

    Joseph

  9. #9
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    Apr 2012
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    Chatsworth, GA USA
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    Quote Originally Posted by chinapete View Post
    ... nice painting, awesome critique, thanks to both of you ...

    Happy you liked it. There will be more before I am done with this one.

  10. #10
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    Apr 2012
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    Chatsworth, GA USA
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    Quote Originally Posted by copespeak View Post
    The inside of an orange is beautiful! All those section, pips and pith. Go do it!
    I am eating an elephant. I will get there. Thanks.

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