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Thread: Where the Digital Art is going?

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Dec 2008
    Location
    Virginia beach, VA
    Posts
    103

    Where the Digital Art is going?

    I'm just wondering, where the DA going?

    1. Are we trying to imitate perfectly hand paintings?
    2. Are we using mostly digital painting by hand achieving something new, something not possible to paint by hand in traditional hand paintings?
    3. Are we using stamps, stickers, rulers and filters mostly?

    Where are we heading? What do you think is the future of Digital Art?
    2006 Hermitage Foundation Museum 1st Place Creativity Award in mixed technique, digital and hand painting called "Red Carpet Torso".TAA Miniatures Show "Tiny Treasures of TAA"

    'Creativity takes courage'
    Henri Matisse


  2. #2
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Posts
    116
    Quote Originally Posted by Vasilenko View Post
    I'm just wondering, where the DA going?

    1. Are we trying to imitate perfectly hand paintings?
    2. Are we using mostly digital painting by hand achieving something new, something not possible to paint by hand in traditional hand paintings?
    3. Are we using stamps, stickers, rulers and filters mostly?

    Where are we heading? What do you think is the future of Digital Art?
    For those just starting out, such as myself, I think Digital Art is a fantastic way to start putting on to screen what is in our heads but is sometimes difficult to do with traditional pen and paper. There are so many tools at our disposal that it really does open up a whole new world of possibilities, to coin a phrase.

    For the future I would imagine DA will find itself expanding into holographic and 3D imagery, where you buy your 3D piece of art to stand on your plinth in the parlour but that may be as I watch far too much Star Trek

    Not completely answering your questions but just a couple of thoughts

  3. #3
    Recently I was looking at some work of Saenredam who lived in the same time as Rembrandt. I found it hard to imagine he did not have some kind of digital help because his work is so detailed. For instance ... this was the town hall in Amsterdam (Holland) he painted in 1675
    http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedi...Amsterdam.jpeg
    On the other hand ... impressionism was the answer to photography and showed art has it's own merit.
    In the same way I believe digital art will only add to the choices we can make to express ourselves.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Mar 2012
    Posts
    3,816

    Disbelievers

    I'm on a AR painting 'road trip' at the moment and was talking to a couple of artists at a B&B I was staying. When I showed the owner one work, she blurted out, "Oh, that's cheating!" I said my standard reply now... 'Well then, you do it!" The next one I showed her, I saw her jaw drop, and I inwardly grinned.

    The other woman has an artist husband who has had a severe stroke, and she was very interested and took down the Wacom tablet details and Art Rage website. I showed them some more work, and explained that it was a new medium that required many hours of research and practice before you could produce professional work that you might want to print, ..... or a really fun medium where you can play endlessly.

    It's not an easy market for 'solid originals', where you have a single item to sell, and I am leaning heavily towards printing my AR paintings and selling them as signed limited edition prints.

    The final of this story is that, as I was paying and leaving, the 'disbeliever' asked me to write down the details as well, as she wants to have a go too! Her flower watercolours are very clever, but the style can easily be produced in AR.

    It's amazing how many people say 'that's not real art' until they see what you can do with it.

  5. #5
    Katsunami Guest
    In contrast to photography, where the "old version" (film) basically died out within the last 10 years, except for some enthusiasts, the "old version" of drawing and painting will be around for a long time yet. There are still quite some things that are quite easily possible using the traditional tools, but they are difficult or impossble in ArtRage. I have experienced that while trying to do some Bob Ross style painting. The other way around, ArtRage can do things no traditional painter can do, such as a 10 step undo, or working in layers, and therefore painting your background *after* your foreground.

    Artrage will exist alongside traditional painting and drawing for the time being and quite far into the future I think; therefore digital painting and drawing is just another medium to work with. Not necessarily better or worse than "real" painting; just different.

    While I still like to do some things the old way, such as playing a Hammond organ, instead of an all-singing, all-dancing keyboard, shoot a fully manual camera with manual lenses (someday I'll probably go even farther back and acquire a Leica digital rangefinder), I'm still a member of the 21st century: my Hammond organ is digital, and my camera is too. Therefore I will now try to draw and paint using some techniques in the old fashioned way, but then digitally.

    I really like to combine old and new stuff; to do old things using new tools. At this point, digital painting / art is just another choice you have to express yourself; it is not yet a full replacement for traditional art in the sense that digital photography practically obliterated and replaced film photografphy.
    Last edited by Katsunami; 09-19-2012 at 11:45 PM.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada
    Posts
    4,462
    I believe Digital Art is giving many the means and the desire to dabble and create art who probably would not have using traditional means.... One of the reasons is the fact it is not so messy as oils nor does it tie up a corner of your room... However computers are quite common in so many households today....

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Aug 2007
    Location
    Washington
    Posts
    25

    My 2 cents.

    I'm a traditional oil painter - for which, to me, there is no substitute be it digital or other. When I am set to paint, only the real thing will do. However, digital art allows me to do things not even remotely possible in oils. I use various brushes, stamps, masking, layers, filters, etc. Whatever tools are at my disposal to create what I want (and in digital work there are many possible tools). And to add to what kenmo said, traditional art is also very expensive - most people already have a computer even if it is old, low-end, minimal resources. Many free or inexpensive drawing/painting programs will get you some nice artistic results with a little practice. To create an oil painting you need to buy/build a canvas, expensive oil paints and brushes, etc. One painting can cost more to produce, regardless of whether it is worth keeping, than many of the art programs out there.

    To wrap it up, digital is simply a different medium vs drawing or oils, etc. Art is art regardless of how it is created. Will digital painting ever completely eliminate traditional painting? I seriously doubt it. At the same time, digital prints are showing up in more traditional galleries. Again, just a new medium to sit alongside acrylics, oils, watercolor, drawing, photography, etc.

    Something to consider: images have been getting "photoshopped" since the early 1900's (Manray for example).

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Englishman in Ont, Canada
    Posts
    3,729
    Many like myself made the jump to digital art after many years of using photoshop to make changes to images.
    A program like Artrage with its use of layers and blending modes is so familiar to photoshop I felt very much at ease with the software and this helped me to start painting.
    Hopefully because of the forum and all my friends here I am making progress.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Aug 2012
    Location
    Canada
    Posts
    17
    Quote Originally Posted by Vasilenko View Post
    I'm just wondering, where the DA going?

    1. Are we trying to imitate perfectly hand paintings?
    2. Are we using mostly digital painting by hand achieving something new, something not possible to paint by hand in traditional hand paintings?
    3. Are we using stamps, stickers, rulers and filters mostly?

    Where are we heading? What do you think is the future of Digital Art?

    Well, we all live in the 21st century. This is the information and new technology time. People want innovations and information about everything. Future comes with everything in digital and with new technologies. Only those who will do any art with own hands (with no help of digital technology) will remain masters. It's truth

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Location
    St. Thomas, USVI
    Posts
    1,610

    It's A Digital World

    We live in a digital world now. Everything is digital, um, except traditional painting, hehe. So, as movie producers are experiencing cost effective ways of making movies digitally and the art needs grow, digital art is headed for the marketplaces in leaps and bounds in all areas. A digital artwork can be printed on a canvas like paper to make it appear as a traditional painting at a lower cost and without the mess and expense of traditional materials for painting. Most online and printed books/magazines and such use digital everything, even a digital picture of an traditional artwork. So, where you ask is it headed? The future of art is here, digital art is the way to go into the future of art itself. That is not to say the traditional art is dead or dying by any means. It is what it is and has always been. Digital art is the new method that allows us all to be artists. ArtRage is the preferred tool by so many artists today, Pro to beginner. Kids are using it to draw, sketch and paint and one day they will be the artists of the digital world they help create artistically by learning with ArtRage. That's my take on it. Hope it helps to answer your question.

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