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Thread: Where I Started - updated 8-22 Today

  1. #1
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    Where I Started - updated 8-22 Today

    I thought it might be of interest to see where I was artistically 35 years ago.. I did this oil for my Mother , its called "Returning Home". so you can see I did not always do abstracts but evolved very slowly in that direction.

    Here are a few fill in the blanks works each spanning 3-5 years from the first one "small oil-farm". ( they loaded out of order so I numbered to get the order right.)

    1 - small-oil farm...this was some years later but I had begun to use brighter colors and a more impressionistic brush work

    4 - Gouache Color Comp3... now almost fully in the abstract but still doing natural media.. watercolor, gouache.. this is egg tempera and charcoal on panel. done nearly twenty years ago..

    2 - spring spirit .. moving to more symbolic and stylized works of nature...

    3 - Village .. I have moved totally away from natural colors and entering a period of abstracting and stylization of brushwork and exploring color schemes.
    Attached Thumbnails Attached Thumbnails Click image for larger version. 

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    Last edited by gxhpainter2; 08-24-2012 at 07:35 AM.

  2. #2
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    Englishman in Ont, Canada
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    I like this very much, maybe I am asking a too personal question, but what took you away from this type of work.
    Geoff

  3. #3
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    Geoff.. not too personal a question at all..and no simple answer, but I guess I got a bit bored..and I wanted to explore artistically more colors and use what I had learned to create shapes, objects and a less literal view of the world around me. like I said it was a slow process of defining the marks and colors.. at first I just dabbled around and was not overly successful but kept looking at all kinds of painting and tried to emulate artists whose work I was drawn to. and eventually have developed my own visual language. I still love works like yours and Brian Tinzo's and my work is still heavily inspired my nature.

  4. #4
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    Shows real talent

    Such a beautiful painting shows that you started fom a firm base. I can understand the explorations. Picasso did!

  5. #5
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    Gary, I kind of suspected you were from a long background of painting. This is very very nice! Oil?
    My real name is Neal Gilbertson, AKA Gilbert Neilson, AKA Jibes.
    I'm a musician too. Please come hear my music at:
    http://www.icompositions.com/artists/jibes


  6. #6
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    Wow. Bored? Interesting. That looks like it took some time to do. And a lot of fastidiousness.

    How long did it take you to get to understand how to do something like this in your evolution as a painter? I'm curious because it looks heavily influenced by other works. (nothing wrong with that because we all do it until we hit our personal place.) Did you ever feel that this was your style or that you were just copying other people's chops?

    I went through phases where I wanted to do a look in a painting copying this artists style and then that. And then when I got fairly good at it I popped off to a different look because I didn't see where else there was to go with it. The challenge, you see, was in the challenge of figuring out how they did it and doing it. But the problem for me was that it wasn't speaking from within me. It was somewhat superficial because I was trying to satisfy someone else's tastes.

    Anyway this is a very accomplished looking painting. Bravo on that. Bet your mom loved it.
    "Not a bit is wasted and the best is yet to come. . ." -- remembered from a dream

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by D Akey View Post
    Wow. Bored? Interesting. That looks like it took some time to do. And a lot of fastidiousness.

    How long did it take you to get to understand how to do something like this in your evolution as a painter? I'm curious because it looks heavily influenced by other works. (nothing wrong with that because we all do it until we hit our personal place.) Did you ever feel that this was your style or that you were just copying other people's chops?

    I went through phases where I wanted to do a look in a painting copying this artists style and then that. And then when I got fairly good at it I popped off to a different look because I didn't see where else there was to go with it. The challenge, you see, was in the challenge of figuring out how they did it and doing it. But the problem for me was that it wasn't speaking from within me. It was somewhat superficial because I was trying to satisfy someone else's tastes.

    Anyway this is a very accomplished looking painting. Bravo on that. Bet your mom loved it.
    D Akey..well maybe bored was a bit harsh but landscape painting had less interest for me that it used to. by the time I did this I had been painting landscapes, etc for about 15 years and had picked up my style from looking at the Impressionist's for colors and Richard Schmidt for the brushwork I basically learned painting from reading books and going to galleries.At the time that I painted this piece I frequently did oil studies on site outside, and then later composed bits and pieces of them into works like this, which was made up. My friends and relatives loved this style of painting and I sold or gave all of them away. But works like Paul Klee, Miro, and Picasso, Asger Jorn really grabbed me around this time and I felt that there was a whole realm of painting in me that wanted out and did not want to be constrained by a style and success that had become comfortable.

  8. #8
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    That's really interesting. Well, between you and me and the lamp post, there's nothing wrong with success and comfort/security in that. That's called making a name and building a clientele. But I understand the luster wearing off.

    Writers have mentioned similar things, feeling pigeon holed in a style and having gathered an audience that to whom they feel obligated to deliver the expected. So what those writers I heard speak (like Dean Koontz) of that is that they wrote under other names, which in fact they built up a whole different following. . . and they also did it when writing in genres that would lower their marketability where at some point they needed the money and which would had killed them when they got respectable. But it was all a way to learn their craft and how to write to deadlines and all that. I have a sneaking feeling their jumps were not so far as yours though, because commercial fiction writing is pretty much the same, just with different heroes and situations.

    Anyway, thanks for answering so openly. Very intriguing moment for you. You did/do have some very good skills in that area.
    "Not a bit is wasted and the best is yet to come. . ." -- remembered from a dream

  9. #9
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    ... this is the lamp post speaking ...

    ... gary and d akey, if I may ... when a work of art is done -- that is, when we stop fiddling with it and ignore it for a sufficiently long time, or sell it or give it away -- we immediately think of its defects, and persuade ourselves we could have done, should have been able to do, a better, or different kind of work ... we want to believe we are perfecting our art, after all, although most artists suffer from obsessive compulsions of one sort or another, if we were to write only "all work and no play makes jack etc." over and over, at some point we would realize the error of repetition, or others will say to us, that's not a new work of art, it's simply what you've done in the past ... just as collectively we believe progress is a necessary part of civilization, so we want our art to involve or reflect a degree of novelty ... this may drive us toward a tendency to "purification" -- the idea is to jettison all that doesn't work in favor of all that does ... but I believe art is "bricolage" -- the skillful use of whatever tools we have at hand to realize a persistent vision ...
    Last edited by chinapete; 08-20-2012 at 07:49 AM.
    xiěyž, n. freehand brushwork, spontaneous expression
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  10. #10
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    Gary, that is some beautiful painting, your mom must have been so proud of you
    I love to paint about anything right now, but my most disapointment in myself is that I always need a ref or 2 or3 and I wish that
    I had the talent of imagination, like our dear Katie or Silvy, Anna and many more in this forum, by the time I get there I will be too old lol
    The last few days I have gone crazy over Impressionism, so I use a ref but change it a little, so maybe that is a start

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