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Thread: Pond

  1. #1
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    Pond

    ... drybrush oil on basic canvas ... iPad double layer base and washes ... AR Pro for post-work ...
    Attached Images Attached Images  
    xiěyž, n. freehand brushwork, spontaneous expression
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  2. #2
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    beautiful... the faintest shimmer of water in the gloaming a darkened winters sky... very minimal yet very evocative.

  3. #3
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    ... gary ... depending on the angle of my laptop screen, I see more or less texture, more or less saturated color in the sky and foreground ... on the iPhone, much of the detail is lost ... on the iPad's retina screen, the image is more luminous throughout ... is the proof in the printing? ...
    xiěyž, n. freehand brushwork, spontaneous expression
    Artrage Gallery
    / Leaning Tree Ink Studio

  4. #4
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    always best to leave a paper trail.

    chinepete..you bring up a good point that I have discussed with D Akey and screenpainter, and you and that is digital work is done while looking at a monitor...that is where the artist makes all the color choices.. and when saved in a compressed format or printed loses something. I think eventually we will have a digital paper so nothing is lost. Although if using the proper ICF file and your screen is calibrated ( not totally necessary anymore ) printing on paper should give a very accurate result.. unfortunately for most people they don't have access to a high large format printer by Epson or Canon or HP.. to test results... I have found that over time I have adjusted my color sense of what is on screen to allow for better prints ( on my Epson Stylus 7600 using ultrachrome inks ) that comes from having done hundreds of prints and having had some pretty spectacular printing flops..

  5. #5
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    ... so one take-away is that digital virtual art is heavily dependent on real world materials -- paper, ink -- until we migrate to a fully digital world, including a credible and inexpensive digital paper (which I wrote about in another post in general chat) ...

    ... a few more general remarks prompted by yours ... there are certain artists whose works I have always thought look better in photographic reproduction than in reality ... Klee comes to mind ... in the early days, I'd be overwhelmed by what I was seeing in inexpensive (well, expensive back then) Skira publications, only to visit a museum and discover that the actual painting or artwork was chalkier, not so glossy or crisp, and underwhelming ... this may be because Klee essentially is a graphic artist and not a colorist ... his Ancient Harmony, for example (a study in "magic squares"), is much duller than most reproductions I've seen ... And when you google this work, you'll see versions ranging in temperature from cool to high-keyed warm ... it's hard to have a sense of what the original may look like ...

    ... glazing in digital does not work exactly as it does with real world materials ... glazing is a technique for darkening, but the darkening also heightens luminosity, mainly because of the way in which light seems to be reflected and complicated when it radiates from beneath the visible surface of the overlay ... although we have darkening techniques in digital (multiply, burn, darken, etc), and the benefit of layers, optically I don't feel the same things are going on digitally that I'm used to in other media ...

    ... my self-consciously styled "drybrush" for "Pond" was an attempt to scumble instead of glaze ... all of my digital works so far are baby steps toward the goal of actually painting digitally ...

    ... what I've just said no doubt will be dismissed by most who just want to paint in AR or any other digital program, and are satisfied with convenience and ease and so forth -- of course, I am too, and I'm especially grateful it's a whole lot cheaper and safer for the environment ... it's just that mostly I'm unhappy that my own work digitally doesn't reproduce faithfully what I'm seeing in my mind's eye, and so I'm pushing the digital works to catch up ...
    xiěyž, n. freehand brushwork, spontaneous expression
    Artrage Gallery
    / Leaning Tree Ink Studio

  6. #6
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    hmmm good points all.. I agree that sometimes when seeing the original work after looking at color prints you see all the "warts and bumps" in the original that seem to disappear in the color prints.. in someways that is encouraging. to realize that the actual brushwork of our favorite painters is not beyond reach..

    one other point.. I have found that watching tutorials on photo manipulation in Photoshop ( lynda.com ...I was member for a number of years ) kind of broke the mold for me digitally.. in that I stopped trying to only emulate natural media but looked at the image and what could be done digitally.. with curves, layer masking, filters, changing color modes, and all the stuff photoshop does... that is why my particular work flow is AR-PS-AR...I love AR for the ease of use in creating and the ability to select colors etc and the variety of textures from the tools... and incorporating that with Photoshop's ability to manipulate creatively and non destructively any image..

  7. #7
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    ... just to add to your thoughts ... one way to express the disconnect between real world and digital is to say that all prints of digitally-created artworks are reproductions ... in that scenario, in some radical sense the "original" must be the image that appears on the artist's computer screen in the program (or programs) that were used to create it ...

    ... alternatively, we can say that, no, the "original" is the digital image that appears on real world materials such as photo or art papers and captured in more or less permanent inks ... the end state in other words is not digital, but "original" in the way that real world arworks are ... note: the word "original" in the digital world is somewhat suspect -- I don't mean originality in terms of content -- but since any image can be reproduced at will without deterioration (except, as we've been discussing, across certain digital displays and compressions), there must be a corresponding change in how we view and value originality (well, I'm not being original here, this is territory long ago covered by Walter Benjamin among others) ...

    ... agree about the necessary change in mindset, but have trouble giving up some advantages inherent in natural media ... the feel of things ... in "Pond," what I hope came through were the underlying brushstrokes in the "gesso" base (imitated in dry varnish oil paint), which in real gesso helps to create a sort of signature or trace movement of the artist's hand, lending energy ...
    Last edited by chinapete; 08-02-2012 at 06:01 AM.
    xiěyž, n. freehand brushwork, spontaneous expression
    Artrage Gallery
    / Leaning Tree Ink Studio

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