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Thread: Self in restoration ...

  1. #1
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    Self in restoration ...

    ... imitating the look of an old unfinished portrait unrolled after many years ...
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    xiěyž, n. freehand brushwork, spontaneous expression
    Artrage Gallery
    / Leaning Tree Ink Studio

  2. #2
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    Neato.

    Perhaps one of Rembrandt's self-portraits?

    I suppose, each region and era of Art History have a specific look, but might be interesting to see how low/minimal you can go. Like in doing the Limbo. How minimal can you get before it all falls apart as representative of what it once had been or when it becomes something else with solidity that way. And then pull back out until it's satisfactory. I mean you are kind of doing that already, but I'm curious about whether you are deliberate yet or are you still trying all kinds of stuff hoping to fall onto something you believe is a direction you can build on. Does it interest you to maybe go small to the point of losing the subject and then painting on top of it whatever it is that it has become for you? Like the wad of yeast that bread makers constantly used to go take a pinch from and use for their new loaves.

    I do see lots of similarities in some ways among all your work, relative to being close up, but wondering where you are in your own mind? What are some of the successes that you might like to explore further? The concept it cool. But as it is more about your process than any one or two paintings, I thought I would ask you about that aspect of your creative journey.
    "Not a bit is wasted and the best is yet to come. . ." -- remembered from a dream

  3. #3
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    Thumbs up

    The imitation is terrific

  4. #4
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    a very classical look. I like.

  5. #5
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    Mien Gott a face a self portrait no less I see you wear Pinz--Nez pete but all yoking apart I Like it

  6. #6
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    at the risk of alienating the folks on this forum who haven't already been put off by my works or words, I'll take the opportunity D Akey has given me to say something about my work in general, and about "self in restoration" ...


    we all have an unexplained compulsion to recreate what already is there ... it's just that, reality is interesting, but never as riveting as what we make of it ... the real is utterly indifferent to feeling, not a little disordered, and more than transient ... so reality should be replaced with a permanent truth ... then what is there is not Venice, but the delicate light in a Turner watercolor; not a person, but the rough surface of a Rembrandt or Titian; not night, but the shadows in Goya; not a persimmon, but the sudden splash of black ink on pure white paper; not a landscape, but the muted red cap of the boatman against the greyish-greens in a Corot souvenir ...


    the best thing about "self in restoration" is its title, because on many levels the painting represents an attempt by a self to restore itself ...


    when I was a student artist, earth colors were cheaper than full-bodied cadmiums, so they formed the core of my palette, along with fast-drying white for underpainting, and japan driers as medium ... one day I was looking at a Chardin self-portrait, I hated the high-keyed colors, but I liked the dark outline of his pince-nez, which made him look like an exotic bird with dark circles under its eyes, and so I began with that idea, and that's why in "self as restoration," the eyes and nose could look like Chardin's, while the rest of the painting could suggest Rembrandt, or that school ... that painting was a failure, got rolled up and put aside ... recently I unrolled it in memory, and the result is what you see...


    ... the self in need of restoration must overcome a flattened nose, an ill-formed mouth, ears gone missing, and misplaced eyes lacking focus ...


    ... to all who have commented, or will, sincere thanks ...
    xiěyž, n. freehand brushwork, spontaneous expression
    Artrage Gallery
    / Leaning Tree Ink Studio

  7. #7
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    Quote Originally Posted by chinapete View Post
    at the risk of alienating the folks on this forum who haven't already been put off by my works or words, I'll take the opportunity D Akey has given me to say something about my work in general, and about "self in restoration" ...


    we all have an unexplained compulsion to recreate what already is there ... it's just that, reality is interesting, but never as riveting as what we make of it ...
    Well, as you know, the world can be overwhelming if not chaotic when taken whole, and I think often times the artist puts order to it. And therein lies the artist's voice, so called. Some people want to make it look like it does because doing so is a challenge in itself, and people tend to respond favorably when done well.

    But clearly you know that there are an infinite number of ways to sort the world, depending on what is important to the artist. Some wonder what it would be like to eliminate all expensive paints for example in order to be able to still paint under the restrictions of not wanting to or not being able to pay a lot for supplies. Same for using only tone and no line, or all line and no tone. Or they want to feature negative space, or just flowers etc. . .

    It all seems to be about getting a handle on something, whether a concept or a profit. Quite natural according to some philosopher or sociologist or whatever who coined what man tends to do in three steps: discover, explore, dominate (or something like that as a natural survival process). I think Art may be a shadow play of that. So what I am addressing is your calling it an "unexplained compulsion". And you seem to be doing an Occam's Razor as method which I always thought to be most valid in dealing with matters philosophical. Why not use it in Art as well.

    Am watching your progress with interest. Forgive me for asking so many questions, but your work does rather beg the question owing to a sort of unconventionality. I think that the more interesting your work looks, the more I want to know.
    "Not a bit is wasted and the best is yet to come. . ." -- remembered from a dream

  8. #8
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    D Akey, it's endlessly fascinating to read what you and others have to say about any of the works in this gallery, so ask away ....

    ... when you talk about observing my "progress," how can I not think again of Freud's famous joke (which may have been self-referential when he recorded it), "he has a great future behind him" ... in art, I don't think there is anything that can be called progress, but there are discrete moments of original insight ... these may or may not be connected in the artist, but it's not necessary always to connect the dots ...

    ... my philosophy of art lies somewhere between Occam's razor and Buridan's donkey :-) ... Here's an excerpt from the wiki explaining Buridan:

    Buridan's ass ... refers to a hypothetical situation wherein an ass is placed precisely midway between a stack of hay and a pail of water. Since the paradox assumes the ass will always go to whichever is closer, it will die of both hunger and thirst since it cannot make any rational decision to choose one over the other.

    I think Caesar could create a fantastic cartoon showing the two concepts battling each other, and in that way also would be drawing my portrait ...
    xiěyž, n. freehand brushwork, spontaneous expression
    Artrage Gallery
    / Leaning Tree Ink Studio

  9. #9
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    chinapete...I love this and the title is perfect.and a multi-level reference also one of my favorite ways to entitle a work.. plus D Akey's questions and your responses are priceless, I THOUGHT by your concepts and talent you had some ( quite a lot ) of artistic talent and training ( these AR works are NOT your first Rodeo ... forgive the analogy after all I live surrounded by cowboys ).. but your works definitely intrigue and challenge.. and give thought to tone and scale..

  10. #10
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    Chinapete, this is fantastic and most difficult to create, the tones are excellent, and a reminder of the great artist of the much, much earlier times, waiting for more

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