ArtRage 5 Product PageArtRage Lite Product PageArtRage for iPad Product PageArtRage for Android Product PageArtRage  Android Oil Painter Free Product PageArtRage  Free Demos Page

Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 17

Thread: Drawing vs Painting

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    UK
    Gallery
    View images
    Posts
    78

    Drawing vs Painting

    I am facing a dilemma. Will painting help improve my drawing or like Degas and Van Gogh should I be concentrating exclusively on drawing, mastering it first before embarking on painting? I am getting on in years but still, I do want to be proficient at both drawing and painting. My tutor says painting is drawing with a brush. I am unsure. What is the right way to proceed for a beginner?

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    Belgium
    Gallery
    View images
    Posts
    1,926
    Why not combining the two? Digital painting got my skills to excell beyound my own expectations.After all, Ctrl+Z is your best friend. And now I do well with all of it.
    Try and retry everything you learn.
    You need to practice, practise,practice, practise,practice, and practise oh, and did I tell you to practise ?
    here's a topic I wanted you to see, in an artsforum. Around the 7th post is a portrait, and the steps that artist used to paint it.Now that is what I call skilled artists.There is no reason why not to try it.
    http://forums.cgsociety.org/showthre...&page=14&pp=15

    So your teacher is somewhat right, when he says "drawing with a brush"so draw, and draw with your brush too.
    hope to have been of any help. Skills come with efforts ,not by themselves
    Just say: "Rage It", because we already know it's art.

    My ArtRage 3 and 4 Gallery------My Site ------- BROWSE MY BOOK

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    UK
    Gallery
    View images
    Posts
    78
    Hanzz many thanks for the link - I have joined their forum. Found the anatomy lesson series Body Part1 The Head and am drawing freehand with AR pen tool, the first image, the teracota Head of Water by the 18th cent. sculptor ADAM Lambert-Sigisbert. Now I would like to make the screen bigger :wink: I think I might do a monochrome study with chalk!

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Gallery
    View images
    Posts
    22,334
    Hanzz, you got me hooked into hours of looking again. Fantastic work.

    There's a lot of amazing artists out there.

    Personally, I think that painting and drawing are valuable to learn side by side.

    It all depends on what you want to use the skills for.

    There are drawing people who use it as an end in itself, frequently for conceptualizing. Much of the time they have a system down where they have certain marks they repeat to encompass getting the ideas across. It's largely stylized, but it can be exciting to look at for the artistry of it nonetheless. But they often are not terribly reliant on photographs because they would then not be coming up with new stufff.

    Then there are people who draw as an end in itself - to hang or publish.

    Then there are those who draw to make paintings and sculpture.

    And then there are those who just paint having learned to make images based on other considerations like placement of light, color and so on, rather than structure.

    It's not like any one of these suffers from being skilled in the other.

    If you're starting out, drawing is less confusing than going straight to painting because you have fewer considerations and you're learning the fundamentals of creating volume and solidity, composition, editing what you see as you translate it to the page.

    So I think some drawing is in order very early on.

    What I recommend is to pick an end point -- the art you want to ultimately make and set about practicing that until you get it down.

    For sure you will discover your weak points and will want then to learn what's holding your picture making back.

    I think that's in part implied by Hanzz's comment about practicing.

    You get the ball rolling and one thing leads to another and another and so forth.

    There are two primary classifications of artist's styles (and many more that have no category). They are linear and tonal. You can see in history which artists gravitated toward which style.

    I think frequently linear artists get into detail more. Tonal get into colors and values more. linear relies on drawing more while tonal less so.

    Which do you gravitate toward? Which artists do you prefer? Go that way.

    Good question.




  5. #5
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Gallery
    View images
    Posts
    19
    I believe you should aquire your drawing skills first, than pursue digital painting, that way you will have solid groud to start from. I respect alot of digital artist but especialy those who do both instead of just one media, such as digital. You need to have a good understanding of your style and of anatomy for the human body before you can paint!

    Hope this helped amigo.


    -Revolver.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    UK
    Gallery
    View images
    Posts
    78
    Thanks D Akey you have given me a lot to think about. I do need to figure out what I want to use the skills for. At the moment I am reading so much, trying to absorb so many techniques, that I am confused and seem to have lost all sense of direction. One artist author recommends drawing/painting from life, another tells me to learn by copying the masters. One tells me to work with lines and structure first, another to start with tones :? How do I allocate limited time to best advantage? Also I like lots of different artists, with different styles, how do I select?

    Revolver I definitely want to achieve good proficiency in drawing, initially indoors but then to have the confidence to sketch outdoors - even in public places without being embarrassed about my pathetic attempts - just to capture moments in time - whatever moves me. So often going up to London on the train I wish I could draw the people around me :cry:

    I observe colours all around me and see the wonderful paintings in London galleries and museums and I want to learn to paint as well! So this is the dilemma - if I just draw how good do I need to become before progressing to painting? Until I draw with speed and accuracy? I am not too bad with the latter - after stating and restating - but I am very slow! Until I become confident in my drawing?

    My problem at the moment is that I am the only student in both, portrait and life drawing classes at the local adult college, who is drawing; all the others, beginners as well as experienced students paint. I notice that the experienced students capture a likeness, the beginners don't. I feel I must first learn to draw but my portrait teacher insists painting will help with my drawing skills. Will it? That's why I am experimenting with paints in ArtRage!

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Gallery
    View images
    Posts
    22,334
    Quite right. Capture the likeness if you can.

    Bottom line on all these considerations is that you are having FUN. That's the most essential.

    You have an inner guidance system that makes your process unique to you. One thing leads to another frequently based on your desire to know how to do something you've seen -- either in the world or in an image.

    Oh yeah, if it suits you, carry a small sketchbook to record thoughts and image impressions. Try that and see if it works for you.

    My recommendation is that when that happens use it as an opportunity to get to know yourself, cause that's the real trick that will make you a great artist. Being able to establish a connection with your inner voice.

    Have fun!





  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Gallery
    View images
    Posts
    19
    Quote Originally Posted by D Akey
    Quite right. Capture the likeness if you can.

    Bottom line on all these considerations is that you are having FUN. That's the most essential.

    You have an inner guidance system that makes your process unique to you. One thing leads to another frequently based on your desire to know how to do something you've seen -- either in the world or in an image.

    Oh yeah, if it suits you, carry a small sketchbook to record thoughts and image impressions. Try that and see if it works for you.

    My recommendation is that when that happens use it as an opportunity to get to know yourself, cause that's the real trick that will make you a great artist. Being able to establish a connection with your inner voice.

    Have fun!





    Here amigo I have found out one of the secrets to creating stunning art even though you are not as skilled as you would like to be. As Akey has mentioned having fun is a crucial step to creating art, so in other words do as you feel and do not think of art as a chore, art should be fun not work! Experiment all you like in artrage, as an artist one has to find his or hers personal style and the way he or she learns well. I learned that just a few weeks ago and it makes me feel better about practicing the arts, do not be concerned about trying to beat other artist or with competition as of yet, instead improve your self and have fun!


    Its good you are taking life drawing classes because its an essential skill for every artist to have. As for drawing what you see around you, do not be concerned what others think, carry a small sketch book around you and practice figure drawing and anything else you want, even if its rough you can just sketch down the idea and go back to it later when you get home. Hope that helps you.


    -Revolver

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Nov 2006
    Location
    UK
    Gallery
    View images
    Posts
    78
    D Akey and Revolver how kind of you to make time and give me some much needed and much appreciated advice. Many, many thanks. I am equipped with a postcard size sketchbook - now just got to muster up the courage to sketch in public! Thanks again and yes, although there is frustration, I am having a gret deal of FUN on this journey of self discovery.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
    Gallery
    View images
    Posts
    22,334
    Well, gawking can get distracting. I used to frequent coffee shops because people usually didn't move too much. . . and I could have some coffee.
    I got really good at drawing the back of people's heads. Heh.

    But the post card size sounds perfect.

    I once had a substitute teacher long ago named Henninger (fairly famous at the time) -- had a spread in American Artist magazine years back.

    What he did was travel Europe. And instead of taking pics with a camera, he did little watercolor sketches on a watercolor tablet roughly the dimension you mentioned. He had a little watercolor cake set that snapped open to make a palette, and used a short handled pointed brush that fit inside when he closed it. I can't recall if he drew minimal pencil first or not.

    He usually did two pics per page. And they were little jewels.

    That might later be a way to draw and paint in the same go, as watercolors often make use of both skills whether you use a pencil or not.

    Just try to not get caught in the rain

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •