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Thread: The same painting made with Artrage and on real canvas

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Germany but I am Dutch....
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    187

    The same painting made with Artrage and on real canvas

    Just to be clear, on paper and canvas I made probably two paintings in my whole life. I made one small oilpainting when I was 20, for my grandmother, because she had a cheap sun- bleeched reproduction hanging on her wall and she loved it so much. The second one I can not remember. I tried to paint with Acrylic paint some years ago but it was horrible.
    But as I started a new painting of horses who have been painted many times before but not together like this, I thought why do I not give it another try. Because I have been painting with Artrage so many hours that it gave me some confidence that this time I may succeed.

    Up til now, on real paper and canvas I used mainly pencil, oilpastel, and any other thing that worked on that painting in particular, like spraypaint, feltpen a.s.o.

    Both paintings are not ready yet, and any tips are very welcome..... This is the one I am making in Artrage.....




    And this is the one I am making on real canvas with Acrylic paint....



    With the one on real canvas I have a problem with the black horse. When I put on wet paint in a shade of grey, I can see the actual color when it dries up, it feels like blind painting.....I think it is very difficult.
    I use four colors to mix for this painting, white, black, yellow and red.
    A friend of mine,who is an abstract painter, told me to use some blue in the black horse....but I do not do that in artrage....should I do this ? Will it make both paintings more beautifull ?
    I have read about making a palette befor you start painting (from Ceasar) so that you do not use to many different colors which will disturb the painting and make it messy.... So for the black horse I used black and white only, for the other horse I used black, white,red and yellow....
    Should I use blue too ? Or should I go on like this.... Both are not ready yet and the digial painting is a little bit mor ready because it is just easier to not have to get al meterials ready

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    NC, USA
    Posts
    2,874
    First things, first... Well done, on both images . It's nice to see how ArtRage can be used as a testing ground, before pursuing a pricy, natural medium, endeavor.

    I mostly used Oil Paints when I was using traditional art mediums, and I don't recall ever having run into an issue, where the painted dried lighter then expected. However, I do remember a proffessor, or two, saying that we shouldn't mix paint brands, because they said it can produce unexpected side effects. So it could be the types of paints, or something you're using to dilute the paint, that's causing it to shift in color, or have a chemical reaction, making it visually lighter.

    As for the black paint question, I was always told that's it best to avoid using a true "black", when painting, for a variety of reasons. One of the main reasons, was that a pure black is usually visually boring. Lacking a single, strong hue, it's difficult to make the object visually stand out. By using color complimenting hues, side by side, a trick of the eye can be achieved, which helps visually push an object to the foreground. In this case, you had a brownish-red background. Because blue is color compliment to orange, by adding a touch of blue, to the black coat of the horse, the horse then seems to stand out from the background better. Or, that's the idea, anyhow... It's also reasonable to add blue to the coat, because a horse is most commonly recognized as frolicking outdoors. Because our sky is blue, there would likely be a blue reflective light on the coat of a horse outside. So, if most people would associate a frolicking horse as being outdoors, adding blue to it's coat will help the illusion of the horse being it's natural environment. There's probably a ton of reasons why one could add "blue" specifically, though.
    Nothing is easy to the unwilling.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Germany but I am Dutch....
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    187
    I think you are totally right Someonesane. I have been looking at the painting again and what I see now after reading this is that the black horse seems to be cut out from a black and white picture... It is also true when I look at it now, that it seems flat and does not stand out like the other one.... I can see what you mean for all the reasons you mentioned.....
    When I pick up the real painting again I will add more color to the black horse. First I am going to try this in the Artrage painting to see what happens.
    Thanks a lot Someonesane....

    I use acrylic paint which you mix with water. It is the first time I use this so I do not have any experience with it. My one and only oilpainting I ever made did not have this problem, the color you put on is the color you get when it's dry. But the acrylic paint (or does it have another name in english ?) dries up lighter than when I painting.

    This was the oil-painting I made for my grandmother......in 1989


  4. #4
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
    Location
    Germany but I am Dutch....
    Posts
    187
    Correction, I made one or two Oilpaintings in my life, I made many many drawings with pencil and crayons and chalk and mixed material but not a real oilpainting, just one probably...

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