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Thread: perspective question.

  1. #1

    perspective question.

    i understand how to put boxes in perspective, i understand about the basics of form and using simple shapes to build a picture. but im utterly frustrated about actually using these methods to draw. its absolutely sickening how theirs 1000s of videos on drawing in perspective with boxes. very if any that show you how to put this method to use! if i want to build a blocky building then im set. and if i want to put a cylinder into perspective then i can do that too. but how does that apply to art and drawing.

    they make it sound great on paper and say how easy it is, but once you start trying to make actual drawings, all that stuff doesn't work. like, i want to draw a stealthf117a, or a house, or a car, it actually wasnt till i bought my first inkscape book that i was informed by the author of the book and developer of inkscape that all perspective is first established by building boxes. nowhere is this mentioned in any youtube vid i watched or book i read. ok, do i know how to put boxes into perspective. yeah? now what? this explains why many amateur artist drawing look so flat.

    from watching people draw on youtube, ive come to the conclusion that when i actually comes time to do an actually drawing, that the artist draws the image from his mind, or reference photo using none of these box/perspective methods. so what am i missing? i heard this is a friendly forum so, i hope that didn't sound rude. i just want to grow as an artist. but don't know how.

    a frustrated amateur artist.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Posts
    101
    Ah, but if you understand how boxes, spheres, and cylinders work in terms of form and perspective, you can construct anything. All forms can be distilled into those basic shapes, even a human body.

    Trying drawing something more complicated, but break it down into those basic shapes, using the rules of perspective you already know. See where those shapes naturally occur.

    Once you understand the basic construction of your subject, you can draw it accurately in perspective, then start layering in more basic shapes for complexity and accuracy, like you're building with legos, eventually adding curves and detail.

    With practice, you'll be doing that in your head, and not explicitly, but it's great when first breaking down a complex form and learning how it's constructed.
    Last edited by ScottC; 12-14-2011 at 01:13 PM.
    .
    Hearts of Space
    The only thing I put in my ears while working.

  3. #3
    can you show an example?

  4. #4
    btw, i just clicked your hearts of space link. very cool music.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Posts
    101
    Astral, I'm afraid I don't have any links to stuff like that handy, although Im sure some other people might chime in here and help. I'd just be googling same as you could.

    Try searching for "Figure Drawing using boxes", Figure drawing using cylinders, etc". You'll no doubt find many tutorials that attempt to teach the human figure by constructing it out basic geometric shapes.

    This is helpful for understanding form and where light should and should not fall on your form, as well as perspective for complex shapes. Sometimes people even do things like enclosing a figure in a a 3d box to help them sort out complicated perspectives. A foreshortened arm bent at angles can sometimes be confusing in terms of perspective, but if you think of it as a series of cylinders, you can work it out.

    Bridgman's anatomy books are great for this. He breaks down human form into simple almost mechanical shapes, to help you better understand how they are constructed.

    Those shapes are the basic building blocks of everything. The legos of the universe. If you look around you, everything you see can be broken down into one or more of those basic shapes. Try drawing what you see around you, using only those basic shapes, and you'll begin to see how understanding how those shapes work in form and perspective, let you understand how anything does.
    Last edited by ScottC; 12-14-2011 at 02:10 PM.
    .
    Hearts of Space
    The only thing I put in my ears while working.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Posts
    101
    Ah, one more thing. I'm afraid I cant spoonfeed you tutorial links, you'll have to claim that knowledge for yourself.

    But I know you are frustrated, so I'll link you to something almost as important:

    http://jeff-vogel.blogspot.com/2011/...hour-rule.html

    People can learn to do anything. But anything worth doing, takes a huge amount of time and persistent, ongoing effort, and nobody gets there overnight. Such a simple truth, and yet so easy to forget. So try not to get too frustrated. Understand you've got a long road ahead, and you're required to fail spectacularly and repeatedly along the way.
    .
    Hearts of Space
    The only thing I put in my ears while working.

  7. #7
    ouch man. well, i just got my first tablet last week. i sorta was expecting to start drawing amazing stuff. i guess not.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Feb 2011
    Posts
    29

    This was helpful to me

    I have had zero training and found some Youtube videos. Try a search for : moatddtutorials. A wide variety of ten-minute drawing techniques, some good ones that helped me were the perspective subjects.All his videos are listed on: Ten Minute Drawing Techniques.

    Hope that helps.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Apr 2006
    Posts
    101
    Here we go. Here's a link to one of the old Loomis books. He goes over everything I was just referencing, but, you know...intelligently. Read it all:

    http://fineart.sk/photo-references/a...essful-drawing

    Has some NSFW photoref links.
    .
    Hearts of Space
    The only thing I put in my ears while working.

  10. #10
    Quote Originally Posted by Migo View Post
    I have had zero training and found some Youtube videos. Try a search for : moatddtutorials. A wide variety of ten-minute drawing techniques, some good ones that helped me were the perspective subjects.All his videos are listed on: Ten Minute Drawing Techniques.

    Hope that helps.
    wow. that guys has some very interesting things to say.

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