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Thread: Real paint paint artists often disgust ArtRagers. Your experience?

  1. #21
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    Dec 2011
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    you know what... people are just as they are. you cant change it. ive been working in tattoo industry for few years, but into it since i passed 14. i dont draw a lot, because im a lazy F. now im almost 30 and now got a thing to paint. i quit tattooing because of people. how many times you can tattoo stars? i did hundreds. how many names you can do? so after 3 years in tattoo studio i said enough. the only thing i get is a white noise in my right ear and pain in my back.
    now im painting a lot. but bought a mac because i suppose to do graphick design. i did few concept art for game, and few paintings.

    but back to the subject. one guy saw my old digital paintings that i print just for show. and he said that are very good, even for first painting. then asked me what medium is that. i said painter/photoshop. he just smile like you do to a kid that dont understand a simple coin trick. ive spent hours on this one, but still was bad. photoshop is evil.
    so even if you paint a white square like Rotko, you can get millions for that. if you paint digitaly, you can get your 50$ and be happy.

    i like to paint in oils, just sit and paint. maybe some one will buy it. and lately i paint small 2X3 inches paintings and sold for 30euro each. great! so will paint something digitaly and sell prints for a 10euro and will seld them for sure.... few days passed, one print sold. getting mad. but can wait.

    i think the problem is a "soul". people see that digital is souless. you cant touch it, you cant hang it, it have no texture.but that was photoshop times. no medium simulation. now with painter or artrage you can do it, and sometimes you cant see a difference.
    also digital is more common now. just go to deviantart. what you first see is a massive amount of digital "art", copies of dragon ball characters. people will remember that. for some digital meant years of MS paint.

    one thing you can do. print your painting on canvas or a board, and do some paint marks. then hear what people say.

  2. #22
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    Apr 2008
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    Cedar Rapids, Iowa
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    I'm not talking about people who produce art for the digital domain such as animations and other similar things, digital for them is perfect.

    Other than graphite drawings I have always done digital art, that is until recently when I have been obsessed to do traditional medium. I found digital much easier by far and still do, but I am getting better at painting as time goes by. I like the direct connect of brush to paper rather than the disconnect of a wacom tablet, but I also miss the undo button.
    Maybe the undo makes it easier for me.

    There is really no substitute for the real thing, digital art is not tangible, it's valid but not tangible.
    In it's finished state it just zeros and ones. If you print it out then it's a step closer. But, to get a high quality print then the cost puts it closer to the cost savings by digital I been reading here. This lack of tangibility really renders digital art valueless to the world in real terms and its just the way it is.
    Even though you may have labored over your painting as much or even more than the traditional Artist it will not matter to the Art world because to them it's not a true artwork, it's pixel dust. The do have a valid point.

    But on a personal level it's very real and mucho fun!

    The vast majority of art done by average people digitally or traditionally will amount to nothing in the end anyway and is mostly for a hobby or just for fun . You could become a famous painter but most likely not, so I say it doesn't matter unless you reach a level of skill where you can demand money for your work.

    If you did "real" art pieces you would have to make prints for sale and you would for digital too. If people want to buy your art they will because they like it, not how you made it. And if you were successful you would make money. But you would not be able to sell originals because there would be nothing other than a master print perhaps.

    Concentrate on the things that make an art-piece a great artwork and you will make a great painting no matter what!
    Last edited by jibes; 12-11-2011 at 06:35 PM.
    My real name is Neal Gilbertson, AKA Gilbert Neilson, AKA Jibes.
    I'm a musician too. Please come hear my music at:
    http://www.icompositions.com/artists/jibes


  3. #23
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    Jun 2011
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    ...one thing you can do. print your painting on canvas or a board, and do some paint marks. then hear what people say...
    Well, cheating is actually a huge part of the subject discussed here. I know, it's something not really applicable, while talking about art and artists, but it's the matter of fact. Of course there were a lot of cheaters at traditional side, but to fudge on a real painting ...you must be a damn good painter. To cheat digital, you can be 15 years old computer freak. This makes quite a difference.
    Another trend, which doesn't help to be taken serious is unfortunately software releases for things like Phone. It wakes illusion, absolute everyone, who can use the cell phone, can also paint, what is obviously far from true, but helps to advertise in some way.

    P.S. I can see your points Jibes. Very well put in your post...

  4. #24
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    what if you paint something digitally and print just one copy? just one as a traditional painting. it is more valuable, because its very limited edition?

  5. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by bartski View Post
    what if you paint something digitally and print just one copy? just one as a traditional painting. it is more valuable, because its very limited edition?
    This is a workable solution except maybe you would have to get rid of the digital original. That might be tough if you posted it somewhere and it would still exist. However, maybe something could be added to the print to make it unique like signature and dating or getting it notarized. Something that could be proved. Like someone suggested: adding some paint to the print would work too but authentication might be best.
    Last edited by jibes; 12-11-2011 at 06:46 PM.
    My real name is Neal Gilbertson, AKA Gilbert Neilson, AKA Jibes.
    I'm a musician too. Please come hear my music at:
    http://www.icompositions.com/artists/jibes


  6. #26
    In my opinion only one thing matters; the final image. It doesn't matter how you get there or what techniques you use. All media are perfectly equal and equally valid. I love the tactile nature of real painting but I also love the flexibility and speed of digital art. Perhaps this 'jack of all trades' view is a consequence of my desire to keep the freelance illustration work ticking along, but I love the fact that I never quite know where the next commission is heading, whether traditional or digital 3D, 2D, photo manipulation, vector... We're all different and I completely understand why some prefer to concentrate on traditional art, but I am so glad I got to live in a time where we can use software like ArtRage. I don't know if it is good or bad thing, but I never make decisions based on other people's snobbery.

  7. #27
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    Mar 2006
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    Interesting discussion! Something I read recently which is somewhat related:

    'Fake' paintings trick viewers in brain scan test

    'The pretension-puncturing experiment suggests that the appreciation of art is strongly linked to the accompanying information - rather than an objective judgement.
    The pleasure taken from a masterpiece is shaped by the viewer being told by others that this is an authentic work.'

    http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/education-16032234

    Anecdotally, I've seen a few situations where people will initially respond favorably to a piece of artwork, then be less enthusiastic once they learn it's digital.

  8. #28
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    Dec 2011
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    tattoo industry is massive moneymaker now. tattooists that paint, also do limited editions of prints of their original paintings. but what with guys that goes to the copy shop and to 100 of copys and sell it?
    easy peasy. make your print special. you dont need to delete your painting files from everywhere, because its your work and you need to show this to people. same when you paint traditionally, you post some photos.
    let that print have value of a real painting. you can do wax emblem, watermark, embossers that leave 3d mark on paper or even your fingerprint. i will do things like that with my prints, but works on websites will have large watermarks that will make prints useless. like my skull, here on critique section.
    again. tattoo industry is full of users that only wait to steal your work, design or photos you their portfolios.

  9. #29
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    Dec 2011
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    @daverage

    same thing with tattoos. if someone will upload some bad work and get plenty of bad comments, then he will mention thats work is some super good guy, all comments will change straight away to good ones and i hate that.

  10. #30
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    Dec 2011
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    This is an interesting discussion, and it has parallels in the writing world. I've had a number of short stories published in the last few years; some of them have appeared in anthologies (which the reader can hold in their hand) while others have appeared only in ezines or websites.

    When I tell my friends and family that I've had another story published, nobody seems very impressed unless they can see it in an actual printed book. Yet I consider my best stories to be the ones published digitally. As Bartski mentioned above, I think people are wired to respond to physical objects.

    It has been interesting to encounter exactly the same thing in the illustration world.

    I guess this is all part of 'the digital divide'. But we are the lucky half! We have the option of both.

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