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Thread: this is RIDICULOUS

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
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    235

    this is RIDICULOUS

    I posted an unfinished pic in Works in Progress today, plunged ahead and finished it, posted it, and have tweaked it about 10 times since I 'finished' it. HOW DO YOU STOP? Every time I go back to it, I see something else, its like the song that never ends....but I "think" this one is finished. It was inspired by the works of Briex, and also PaperTree with adorable pic of the little boy and the raincoat....many thanks..Click image for larger version. 

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  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
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    601
    Btw, the mother's face and hair are much improved. I often like a painting that can simultaneously be detailed in some aspects, when it needs to be, and very gestural and dynamic in others.

    As for finishing art-images and poems are abandoned more than finished, IMO. LOL! And sometimes critiques are best applied to your next painting from the start, rather than on the current one. My two cents.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
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    235
    Thanks for the words of wisdom, i am going to work on that hand tho, what you said made so much sense. Now one more thing....i feel like the colour of that row of trees is wrong....is it too blue?shouldnit be a different shade?...many thanks

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Sep 2007
    Location
    Very Small town in Illinois
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    5,170
    I think you have done a fine job with this. In the end, you just have to decide for yourself if your painting is "done". After all, it's your painting. If you are satisfied with it - that's all that really matters.
    My Gallery:

    http://members.artrage.com/vb_users/2939
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  5. #5
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
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    235
    Ahh , and therin lies the problem barnburner, i alway feel it can be better

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
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    601
    Well, I would also say "What's the reason you're painting?" Personally, I paint in order to pay attention. That often means understanding why things are the way they are, and really __seeing__ things, not just painting them the "way I want to". Thus, to me, for example, the trees in the background lose a proper sense of depth because the color is too saturated. As you fade into the distance, atmospheric perspective takes hold. This means things look hazier, and have a greyer tone. Up close, things tend to look more vivid color-wise. Similar concepts re: color apply to things like shadows, which generally have a bit of blue in them.

    Of course, you don't need to follow these principals to make good art. I completely agree with that. BUT, if part of why you're doing art is to "pay attention and see things as they really are" then understanding these sorts of things, and expressing them in your pictures, can help you make art that is more "successful" by those terms. Also, color and whatnot also is a useful tool. And sometimes things don't seem quite right to our eyes when we see a painting-- color is often the culprit as we learn to work with it.

    Thus, for example, even though perhaps the colors on the boy aren't truly realistic, they read very well-- you've got your darker shades with bluer tones down on the lower arm, and I also recognized the bit of red you splashed down on the water and on his arm. Is it totally real? No. But understanding a bit about why color works the way it does allows you to play with it and use it with more control. Like you're doing here.

    Personally, I'd love to see you really tackle the sky and make it do something for you. I once had a teacher that said "If it doesn't help the painting it's hurting it, there's no real in between." And that's often the approach I take to my pieces. I don't really think the sky is hurting the piece right now, but I think it could do more for you, be more expressive, help the piece cohere, balance it more. I know that it's just white in the picture, but that is just the pic. This is your picture, and I'd take it where you want to make it the best composition you can. Blue at the top, fading down? Blue at the bottom, fading up? Clouds? Other colors? I dunno. But I think you might gain something from experimenting a bit on a new layer.

    I dunno. I just wanted to express the idea that it's fine to be critical of your own work and really "push it", and to understand why you might like it to be "better"-- whatever that might mean to you personally. I definitely think it's improving, bit by bit.
    Last edited by Steve B; 10-21-2011 at 02:58 PM.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
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    235
    your comments are sooooo helpful. am reading and taking it all in. I think my reason for leaving the sky stark, is that I am afraid of it becoming to busy. As a bit of history, in my 'real life painting' I paint photo realistic paintings of wooden canoes on a stark and surreal background. Yes, it is very specific!! but that is what I paint, so to deviate from that and do these lose oils is a real departure, and then to try to put in a background on top of a busy foreground....now thats just asking to much!!! Here is a link to a page of my paintings, perhaps that will shed light on how different this is for me....and why I am having trouble....
    http://www.margilaurin.ca/Site/Canoes.html

  8. #8
    Join Date
    May 2007
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    Rome (Italy)
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    24,113
    This painting is a very good one, not far from an excellent and finished artpiece in my view.
    Since You ask, in addition to all other wiser suggestions and advices (very useful to be considered indeed) I can only say that You should stop when You feel You're losing Your fresh and magical touch, Your inner boost and You're getting somehow backward by detailing more or by unsuccessfully trying to improve or correct.
    You may then either stop (if the painting looks balanced enough in all elements, no matter if it may look unfinished) or leave it for some time and resume it when You feel "warm" again about it.
    I may say that the real and greatest artists are the ones who know where to stop exactly, so the most difficult choice since those masters are a real rarity.
    Last edited by Caesar; 10-21-2011 at 10:23 PM.
    Panta rei (everything flows)!

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Posts
    235
    Thank you very much for those kind words, as a new user of ArtRage, I am at the beginning of the learning curve and am loving it tremendously but also making some basic errors. I am using my ipad, and I believe (although could be wrong) that once I have merged the layers (yes, I know I shouldnt have ) I can not get behind the figures to work on the background...is that correct? If I were using the desk top version, is there a way to select the figures and add a new layer as there is in photoshop? I am not planning to do this on this one, I am leaving as is, but would like to know this for future paintings. I may try to soften that tree colour and add some lavender as was suggested and fade into the white and see how that looks....

  10. #10
    Join Date
    May 2007
    Location
    Rome (Italy)
    Posts
    24,113
    If You draw or paint on separate layers separate objects or layers of it, You may select and move each of them on that layer, in case blinding the other layers.
    Anyway, for calculations power reason and for keeping a manageable number of layers, it's better not proliferate with layers and give each a specific "purpose" as Nick Harris (alias Nickillus) tecahed us in his awful thread in the Ambient Section. Have a look in case ...
    Panta rei (everything flows)!

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