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Thread: Lazy River Interpretation

  1. #1
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    Aug 2010
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    Lazy River Interpretation

    Thank you to Someonesane...! You r the best!

    Thank you also to YaYuanart.com! I had found this lazy river scene on Google and since it was too hot to go out and explore for my own lazy river - I decided to try my hand at interpreting this one. I couldn't find a name for the artist if someone knows I will be extremely happy to give Credit to the fabulous artist.

    Blessings, GigiCharm
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  2. #2
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    gigiCharm... ..... you are making great strides using this style !.. I love this one it is a beautiful painting and the trees and sky are much much better but still retain a look that is yours...

  3. #3
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    Fun. Parts of the texture in the sky especially remind me of a hook rug I had in my room growing up. Subject was different, but it's got a quality I can relate to. So I'm getting hooked in, you might say.

    Has a lovely decorative, homey feel to it. Your version (above?) is closer to the viewer and I feel more wrapped in the setting, whereas the bottom one, which reminds me a little of the Hudson Valley school, is more set back, as if coming onto a wide scene. Both effects are good, and as the artist one has a choice of what they/you want to say in a picture through the use of visual devices.

    I think when one uses a technique in which the marks are very visible in a decorative format, not unlike a tile mosaic at the extreme, it defies the illusion of depth in favor of a more decorative approach. Again, all directions are quite valid.

    And your early technique direction in this can certainly be grown into some great artistic expression when you explore the artistic mark-making choices and color further.

    But with yours, I get the heart in the appreciation of the place, and the overall feel communicates and is quite commendable.

    Very cool!
    "Not a bit is wasted and the best is yet to come. . ." -- remembered from a dream

  4. #4
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    Thank you GXHpainter and D Akey for the lovely comments and suggestions...!

    D Akey, can you help me, you used the wording mark-making choices, technique direction and color in a way I don't understand...???

    If you can help me understand so that I might grow it would be appreciated?

    Blessings to you both,
    GigiCharm

  5. #5
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    Apr 2006
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    That is a very nice interpretation!! Very cool effect!!
    -Dave

  6. #6
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    Quote:

    Originally Posted by gigicharm
    D Akey, can you help me, you used the wording mark-making choices, technique direction and color in a way I don't understand...???

    If you can help me understand so that I might grow it would be appreciated?
    ----------------------


    Sure.

    I'll expand on what I was saying and hope I get what you're asking. Just as an overview of where I'm going: two considerations are that the artist can depict the subject and try to make it really look like a photograph where the picture serves the subject, or the artist can deviate from that and make the subject serve the picture owing to the shape relations or something else that the subject might be lacking that the artist wants to really push.

    Mark-making is how you apply the paint to the canvas, and it has an infinite range of possibilities from a smudge to a daub to a line to a wet into wet bleeding blend and also with computers we have mechanical marks that come from a sewing machine repeated stippling effect. Plus many more if one takes into account effects and filters as ways to make marks by manipulating the paint somehow. All valid. Each with different visual characteristics. And some more about the rendered image looking very like the subject and some more about the cool effects. The painting you did appears in the middle somewhat but the stippled look is leaning it toward the art for art's sake look.

    I am basing my answer on the assumption that yours is the picture that appears first? Or are they both yours? Anyway, the one appearing first had a somewhat mechanical quality to the marks owing to the daubs appearing the same (or using a similar array patterning as with the glitter tool or in Photoshop the setting would be "Scattering" and "Jitter" to get the daubs to hit the canvas in the same clustery way.)

    And that gives a particular look where the marks themselves do not inherently describe the sky or the tree but rather it is seen as a group comprising the sky area and tree area handled in similar mechanical ways.

    All those little marks imply sky because of the colors and placement not because it's wispy and airy. In the case of a line drawing of say a horse's leg, a drawn line might imply light and shadow based on the thickness of the line (heavier and blacker being the shadow part) plus it could also follow contours along the edge as well as crosswise to show the volume. The drawn mark can take on that quality and have more finesse and that's why one might use line.

    But where I was going with it, where the mosaic or even the stippled look is that it becomes more decorative unto itself, and quite often serves the art piece as an art piece more than the thing it's describing. One can still hang onto the subject, but it becomes it's own dance of the canvas. A thing unto itself. It's just a different direction one can go. Just throwing the idea out there.

    So while that variation is not in the nature of that kind of mark, the trade off is that you can perhaps exploit the design and decorative placement and scale of the marks and color values creating sectional groupings and optical directions and patterns and the effects that can be had with those ideas and so on, as being something to work with were you to want to explore that mosaic route more. It's like perhaps painting a picture with every sensibility still working, only focusing more on the surface of the canvas in a decorative way with the shapes implying the scene to a greater or lesser degree, however it would play out during your process. I personally prefer paintings that do both, and the balance between them is the thing. I find especially fascinating where and how to change the normal, expected way things are handled without loosing the essence. But that's me.

    I think "How far can I push this into a non representational direction yet still keep the integrity of the subject. And additionally, how can I make the marks interesting unto themselves and each other so it could live without the subject if the subject was uninteresting." And at the extreme, one could push the abstraction out to where it refers to nothing but the paint and marks or whatever. That can certainly work as art, and can without doubt work decoratively, depending on the skill of the artist.

    This tile quality is in contrast to the idea of an organic paint stroke approach. One limited comparison of showing the different sensibilities would be Gustav Klimpt vs Andrew Wyeth (as only one of a million possible comparisons of style, neither of whom was entirely in one camp or the other, but you could see the difference if you compared them). There are infinite degrees one can take their images both free and tight. And it makes it far more interesting to play in that sandbox of the truly creative artist over the technician for me as viewer, but all ways have their respective merits. I mean I love a great rendering, but unless it's a really amazing scene or something I love that hooks me on that level, it's easy to get bored.

    Again it's a mark-making concept I'm talking about, or a strategy one might adopt as a way to explore visual directions rather than trying to do it the time honored, photographic way. To the artist all directions are available (more or less) and is there to serve one's vision and/or curiosity. Yet if this doesn't resonate with you, then it's not important and possibly not for you at this time because you are headed in a different direction. I was commenting on your interest in doing something stylized based on the nature of your mark-making and was merely pointing further down that road I guessed you were heading.

    Hope that is of some value to you and I didn't just confuse the whole business further.
    Last edited by D Akey; 08-07-2011 at 04:18 AM.
    "Not a bit is wasted and the best is yet to come. . ." -- remembered from a dream

  7. #7
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    You are developing quite a unique style and have made great strides with this painting...Great job !!!
    Try to see as many angles of vision as possible...no single one of us has a "handle" on the whole picture.

  8. #8
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    Jul 2006
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    Ignore all that what I said before. Hahah. I tend to rattle on. Really, all that I said has nothing to do with using that tool.

    I imagine they designed it to be a fun ride, that tool, however it works for you. Enjoy it! That's the point. isn't it.
    "Not a bit is wasted and the best is yet to come. . ." -- remembered from a dream

  9. #9
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    Mar 2006
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    Pakistan
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    these are beautiful, very soothing.
    regards,
    waheednasir.
    www.waheednasir.com

  10. #10
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    Aug 2010
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    Fort Worth, Texas
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    Sorry everyone - D Akey, Semd74, Waheednasir,

    My husband's uncle passed away and I had to leave you for awhile. Thank you for the lovely compliments.

    D Akey, I'm still not sure what you meant but I think I get the gist of it and appreciate such a thorough explanation! I do love this tool and I know it might not be real art or very artistic but it's fun!

    Blessings,
    Gigicharm

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