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Thread: PC tablet for artrage

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
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    4

    Talking PC tablet for artrage

    Hello. I'm annoyed by my keyboard in front of my screen and I'm looking for some in put about which slate tablet pc works well with artrage. I use a small wacom tablet for input.

    I have local support for Dell, HP and IBM. I live three hours from any other support on the U.S. Canadian border. I have 20+ years experience with PCs and at 65 I'm not inclined to go Apple.

    I'm sure this topic is not new and I appologize for putting everyone through it again. tanx

  2. #2
    Join Date
    May 2006
    Location
    UK
    Posts
    132
    Your message is rather confusing. In one place you imply you are looking for a "slate tablet pc". Are you looking for a tablet pc or a tablet made of slate? I don't think there is such a thing as a 'slate tablet' computer. You say you have a wacom tablet, so why do you want a tablet pc? You say you have local support for IBM, Dell etc yet you want to go for an Apple. Apples are famous for their build and operating system but there are some good PCs around.

    Maybe if you clarify what you are looking for someone might be able to help.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    New Zealand
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    3,137
    We suggested rtrykingfisher ask on the forum to see what experience people had of Windows Slate style computers or Tablet PC style machines. If anyone has been using either and has any opinions on what might work well with the product, let us know here. While we have used some, it's always good to get feedback from the wider community on what works!
    Matt
    ArtRage UI
    Ambient Design.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Posts
    4

    Talking confusion

    Yes I am known for my ability to confuse. Thank you Mattrage for your comments.

    I mentioned slate pc as a style that does not have a physical/seperate keyboard. I have been involved with teaching pc applications to tradesmen since MS "acquired" their first DOS.

    I have been enamored (SP) with the tablet form (slate no keyboard) since they were first being considered.

    I am not so to speak anti-apple I just have more experience with pcs.

    tanxwbb

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    London, UK
    Posts
    81
    I have been using ArtRage with slates. It's great in a way, but only less than half of the fun compared to a real digitizer, because the slate digitizers aren't pressure sensitive.

    The true solution are the Wacom Cintiq units, but these are too expensive for most hobbyists. Maybe you can sell your motorbike, or your wife, or a few paintings, in exchange for a Cintiq?

    I'd love one, but limit myself to a cheap-ish Genius M712X and Artrage on an old Windows tablet. Also use Autodesk Sketchbook on an Android tablet, that's pretty good fun. Haven't seen Artrage on iPad myself, but that could also be a nice sofa-time sketching solution. No ArtRage for Android (yet) :-(
    It's not about how many breaths you take; it's about the moments that take your breath away.

  6. #6
    I'm currently considering one of these:

    http://computers.shop.ebay.com/PC-La...=p3286.c0.m282

    They are about 7 years old now, which means they are fairly limited. However they are also inexpensive (via Ebay) and have NVidia display chipsets vs. the Intel graphics chips (better for graphics) and are Wacom enabled digitizers.

    http://www.tabletpcbuzz.com/showthre...w-by-violajack

    Until we see new offerings from HP, Asus, or some others, these are still amazing machines. Upgrading memory, and installing an SSD will help improve performance.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    London, UK
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    81
    I've got one of those collecting dust on my shelf. Intact, 60GB drive, 2GB RAM, if memory serves me right. A great part seven years ago. Still an OK part for casual sofa-browsing (with low video content) and emailing, but drawing? Not really. Also no pressure sensitivity.

    iPad has Artrage app. Android tablets have Autodesk Sketchbook. For smaller budgets, you can still bite the bullet and do as we all do: use a regular digitizer (without build-in display) and a standard monitor.

    While the Compaq TC1100 might be around for $200 or less these days, this is because it ain't worth more any more. You'd get much better hardware for little more money.
    It's not about how many breaths you take; it's about the moments that take your breath away.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
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    Ambient Design
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    3,502
    With the HP TC1100 there may have been a technical problem if you weren't getting pressure sensitivity, as the HP TC1100s Wacom digitiser is meant to support pressure to the best of my knowledge. I believe a couple of people posted they were using one a few years ago, while they're definitely getting on a bit in years now!

    If you're looking at TabletPCs with pressure senitive digitisers, it would probably be worthwhile looking at a newer TabletPC to support ArtRage Studio / Studio Pro ( as these newer versions have some more demanding tools like watercolor ), multiple processors cores will be useful for speed in the future as we update the software.
    Dave
    Resident Bug-Hunter
    Ambient Design

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Apr 2011
    Posts
    4
    A hp 500 slate is near the top of my list now. I saw a video by one of the forum members and that person seemed quite pleased.

    Any comments re: that hardware.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jan 2011
    Posts
    601
    Watch out! This is a long one. :P

    ********

    First, you really should go to the forums here-

    http://forum.tabletpcreview.com/

    This is just an amazing community of tablet pc users who are very giving with their time. A very helpful forum for anyone interested in using a slate PC or a convertible PC for art/business/etc. They even have a forum called "What Tablet PC Should I Buy?" where you fill out a form and people give you recommendations. I mean, they really do come and spend their free time just giving advice. They also have something called "The Exhaustive Tablet PC FAQ" in that forum which is a very very informative read. Just a great place to educated yourself- and, yes, there are many many options available for people who would like a slate or tablet PC with a fully funcional Wacom digitzer- with 256 levels of pressure sensitivity. You can get 2-3 year old used ones with Core 2 Duo cpus, 4 gb ram, etc. off of ebay pretty easily for around 500-700$.

    The slates (totally keyboardless) are great, but often more expensive, or are a little older. Essentially, you pay for the form factor. My understanding is that even the tc1100 has pressure sensitivity- you just need to download the Wacom driver for it (it doesn't come preinstalled). If you're feeling a bit budget conscious, the way to go is usually with one of the convertibles-- these are laptops that have a screen that swivels around on a hinge and become slate tablets for drawing with a stylus (the keyboard is covered by the back of the screen, which usually locks into place). These are the ones that usually are running 500-700$ on ebay, refurbished or used. It's what I'm using right now to type this post, and it's what I'll use to do art directly on the screen.

    Sometimes people have concerns about 256 levels of pressure sensitivity (which is what all of the Wacom-enabled slates and convertibles have, except the modbook which is 512) versus the various levels of higher pressure senstivity available in cintiq's and other wacom pads. My opinion is that it doesn't really matter. Others sometimes disagree. If you go on youtube, there are some great videos comparing (in real time) the comparative results of working with 256 levels versus, say, 1024 or 2000 levels. The results? 256 is very, very workable.

    What's probably nicest about a lot of these convertible tablets and slates is that for 1/2 the price of a 12" cintiq you can buy a very portable laptop (4 lbs or so) with a keyboard, that also converts into a slate and lets you draw directly on the screen with a stylus, and the computer is portable. Draw on your couch, at a cafe, the back table, whatever. You're not chained to a desktop. And they're usually pretty powerful machines for the price- core 2 duo's, 2-4 gb ram, Windows 7, etc.

    I just cannot sing the praises enough of having a computer like this. Well worth investigating. And much less expensive than one would think, if you're savvy enough to buy one used on ebay. I suppose if one had a super powerful desktop then things would be different, but for those who don't, this is an awesome alternative, or if you can't afford a Cintiq, or you need/want to be mobile.

    Re: slates in general. The big question is always whether or not they have a Wacom digitzer or not. The Ipad doesn't. Most do not. Some come with capacative digitizers (fingers only), others come with N-Trig (an alternative to Wacom that seems to be less accuracte, although I've never tried one-- it comes on the HP500). There are only a few of them that have Wacom digitzers- the TC1100 (7 years old, 250$ on ebay), the Fujitsu Stylistics (5 years old or so, about the same price), the Motion Computing 1600 (about the same price) or the 1700 (around 500-700$ on ebay) or the new Asus ep121 (1000$ new). There aren't many options. The other issue is that the older slates tend to be underpowered, and a single core computer just doesn't seem like it has enough power to really run an OS and a program like Artrage at the same time very well. If you're getting a convertible, there are many more options (and more powerful options with better battery life), but they tend to filter down to Fujitsus, HP's, and Lenovo's. Atleast that's what they generally recommend if you ask on the forum I suggested.

    As for the computer I'm using (a Lenovo x200 tablet)-- I absolutely adore it. I just can't imagine having to sit at a desktop in a different room from everyone else, drawing on a pad on the desk while looking up at the screen. I really have no complaints. No more lag than I've heard of from others, while using big water color brushes, for example. For other brushes there's no lag at all, that I can discern-- oils, inks, pencils, etc run great. The watercolors only really lag when I hit sizes about 100. I run big canvases (12" x 18" at 300 dpi) and it runs fine. 10 layers or so myself. Runs great. Is it slow when merging layers? Yeah, but that's a problem with Artrage in general, not my computer specifically. Is it slow when opening or saving big files? Yeah, a bit, but that seems normal as well. It really is a dream. I think the only real negative is that it's only a 12.1" screen, so if you're used to working on a much bigger screen it might feel cramped.

    I guess the benefits to using a desktop over a convertible would be- a) a better screen is possible on a desktop, and b) desktops are much more powerful, and c) cintiq's can use tilt sensitive brushes. But Artrage doesn't utilize a lot of these functions anyways, so it doesn't generally matter for that application-- a convertible laptop like I'm suggesting is just about as powerful a computer as Artrage can really fully utilize. More cores don't help, neither does being 64 bit, neither does using tilt sensitive brushes. So for Artrage specifically, a convertible is is just about as good, or as good, as a desktop, IMO.

    Anyways, this has rambled on a lot. But don't let anyone suggest there aren't lots of reasonably affordable options (500-700$) available for people who want to draw directly on the screen of their computer with 265 levels of full Wacom pressure sensitivity, while sitting on their couch!

    If you have any specific questions, ask away. I love to spread the gospel. Hee hee!
    Last edited by Steve B; 04-18-2011 at 06:13 AM.

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