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Thread: Use of stencils

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
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    Englishman in Ont, Canada
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    Use of stencils

    When using the create stencil from layer content is there some way of making the stencil strong enough to block out paint from going beyond the stencil.
    When ever I try this I find my stencil does not block out any future paint completely .
    Thanks Geoff

  2. #2
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    The only way to stop any color from getting through a stencil is to have that area of the stencil be completely white, because they sort of work like screen printing. Any area of a stencil that is not completely white, will allow color to bleed through it once it's in ArtRage. Take the image below for example. On the top row, I have imported a color photo to use as a stencil. The stencil of the image appears like a negative photo. Filling the stencil in with black, results in a sort of gray scale image. The second row uses the same image, but I made contrast, brightness and color changes to it, so that it became a black and white (devoid of grays) image. Because there is no gray areas, filling this stencil in results in solid color fills wherever color is let through (the black areas of image).

    Click image for larger version. 

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    So basically, you want to either use images that are made in only pure black and pure white (no gray), or edit your images so that the areas you don't want to allow paint through are pure white.

    (EDIT) - Here's a link with some more explanations on stencils (I was using AR2.6 at the time, but ideas still apply): http://www2.ambientdesign.com/forums...ad.php?t=21889
    Nothing is easy to the unwilling.

  3. #3
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    Mar 2011
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    Englishman in Ont, Canada
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    Thanks for the reply, thought I would give a little more detail of what I was trying to do.
    I was working through the "Billy Piper " tutorial to try and do something similar
    on a painting I am working on.
    In the tutorial he paints the skin with an all over skin tone and then makes a stencil from that.
    He then used the knife to flatten out his brush strokes but when I try that it pushes paint beyond the stencil.
    I wondered if there was some setting to adjust density of stencil
    Regards Geoff

  4. #4
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    Is your stencil a "Blue" color? If so, you're using the "Guide Mode" for the stencil, which isn't ideal for masking purposes. Right click on the stencil, and select "Stencil Mode" from the menu, and try it again.

    If that's not the issue, then it's most likely due to the type of tool you're using, or it's settings. When you create a stencil from a layer, any areas that aren't completely filled with a 100% opacity, will allow color to bleed through. Take the following for example...

    Here's an image created using the Ink Pen Tool. As it appears here, one might say that I have created two lines using the same tool, settings and color.

    Name:  1.jpg
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    However... These two lines were not created using the same settings or hue. The line on the left was created using 50% opacity, which allows some of the canvas color to show through, while the line on the right was made at 100% opacity, but with a lighter color choice, making the two lines appear as though they are of the same type. To illustrate this, I've drawn a pure black line on the layer beneath the two green lines. As you can see, the line on the left allows us to see the black line through it, while the right line completely blocks the color from coming through.

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    Because the line on the left is slightly transparent, it means a stencil made from it will allow a slight amount of color through it. Since the line on the right is completely solid, a stencil made from that will allow all the color through it.

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    So, be sure that the area surrounding the figure you're painting, isn't filled with any color, otherwise it will allow bleeding.
    Nothing is easy to the unwilling.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Mar 2011
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    Englishman in Ont, Canada
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    Thanks for taking the time, my stencil was red, however i have altered my process a little and got over my problem.
    Thanks Geoff

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