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Thread: Oil paint brush: direction versus amount

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
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    156

    Oil paint brush: direction versus amount

    What I mean is that, if I lay down strokes with the oil paint, say, from left to right, pressure 30, loading 5, thinners 23, I get what appears to be a thin lay-down of pigment.

    so far, so good.

    then I like to use the palette knife to achieve blending of various colors I've layed down. If I knife in the same direction as I painted, not much smearing happens, as though there's not much pigment on the canvas.

    However, if I knife in a direction perpendicular to the original strokes, suddenly the paint begins to show great dimensional depth, as though I'd layed down a goodly gob of it!...and I have more pigment than I wanted..sometimes I like a dry brush look; but this changes that to a generous amount of paint that I didn't put down or intend to.

    This has me a bit cornfused. In the real world, if I layed down a lot of oil paint, I'd see it; if thin, it'd look thin and I'd see that. Why should the palette knife seemingly "grow" the amount of paint on the canvas merely by altering the direction of knifing?

    Is this correct behavior?...and by "correct," I mean, is ArtRage intended by its authors to behave this way?

    thanks!

    archer
    Last edited by archer; 03-04-2011 at 04:59 AM.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
    Posts
    234
    Hi Archer

    I experimented with your Oil setting and Hard Wet, Hard Smuge and Smear on default and did not get seem to get what you're describing. I got an even distribution around the stroke.


    Basic Paper(default)


    screenshot of the overlapped stroke experiment
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  3. #3
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    More experiments.This time on Basic Canvas (default)
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  4. #4
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    well you sure gave it a fair try...when I have a moment, I can take a screen movie of what I do..I'll keep the palettes tucked in close to show settings, then I can post it some time..

    a

  5. #5
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    Jun 2006
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    Here is a link to a quick movie I made demonstrating what happens...the movie is only 1mb and should load fairly quickly..quick time...


    http://www.coffeeonmars.com/OilBrush2.mov

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    Ambient Design
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    3,502
    After looking at the video, the first one smudged which indicates there's not much paint volume, the second one smeared which indicates more volume. By the looks of it you're using the palette knife across the beginning of the strokes which is where the paint volume is at its greatest, so you're getting volume from multiple stroke beginnings under your knife.

    The palette knife strokes which run in the same direction as the paint strokes are not getting as much total volume to smear, as they are only intersecting with one or two strokes.

    So in short: When you're going with the strokes, you're intersecting with a single stroke, which has most of its volume at the beginning. When you're going across the strokes, you're intersecting with the volume from multiple strokes, which have most of their volume at the beginning.
    Dave
    Resident Bug-Hunter
    Ambient Design

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
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    156
    OK..I get what you are saying, but why should the paint on the canvas actually BUILD to an amount of paint far greater than what was there before I began palette knifing?

    You can see from the oil settings and from the movie that it runs out after short strokes, so I didn't load my brush up with globs of paint...yet, by using the palette knife, I can apparently induce more paint to be there than I brushed on.

    a

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    New Zealand
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    3,137
    It's possible that this is caused by the texture you're using. I'm having trouble replicating the exact behaviour here with the settings you mentioned before. I would expect there to be more volume when you go over 3 'stroke starts' as Dave suggested, but I wouldn't expect it to add more paint to the canvas.

    Could you try replicating it on a default paper texture and see if it happens there as well? It's possible that the nature of the grain is causing a problem. If it does happen, could you post a preset with the settings you're using for the brush and the knife and I'll check it out in more detail.
    Matt
    ArtRage UI
    Ambient Design.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Dec 2010
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    234
    Quote Originally Posted by archer View Post
    Here is a link to a quick movie I made demonstrating what happens...the movie is only 1mb and should load fairly quickly..quick time...


    http://www.coffeeonmars.com/OilBrush2.mov

    Your strokes are very different to mine archer.

    Your Oil setting. Basic Canvas (default)
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    Last edited by Chuckart; 03-04-2011 at 02:11 PM.

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Jun 2006
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    156
    I understand that some surfaces may hold more pigment than others, but my question remains:


    why after laying down oil paint with a brush who's loading is 5% does palette knifing perpedicular to the original brush strokes make MORE paint appear, and cause it to appear to build up?


    It's as though palette knifing at 90 degrees actually deposits more paint.

    THAT to me is the puzzler..the question here; not whether toothier, pittier paper can accept more paint.

    In fact, the more I work with the palette knife, the more the paint builds up. It sort of reminds me of a tool in Painter, called the Loaded Palette knife, in which the knife has a load of paint on it; not merely a knife to move paint already on the canvass.


    a
    Last edited by archer; 03-04-2011 at 02:53 PM.

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