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Thread: oil pastel artrage preset

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
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    dayton, OH
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    oil pastel artrage preset

    Hello, I would like to know if anyone is capable of making an oil pastel preset for the crayon tool or any other tool. I would like to be able to apply color, obtain a slight grain from the paper, and be able to apply color thickly, but still be able to smear colors just with the tool itself. I would prefer if the artrage crayon user someonesane makes the preset, but anyone else is welcome to make it.

  2. I really like soft pastels (especially Schmincke). With traditional soft pastels, I typically lay down the color first then blend with my fingers and mix in accent colors as I go.

    I'm finding that squirting lines of paint out of tubes in ArtRage and then smearing it around with the palette knife simulates how I work with soft pastels (like this painting from a couple of days ago: http://fav.me/d31h124), but there's so many different ways to work with them, that wouldn't work for others. The paint tube doesn't pick up background colors when you lay it down like the paintbrushes do, but you can mix/smear it with the pallette knife after it's on the paper. If you do the paint tube at 0% pressure then it doesn't have the rippley lines, but it still looks like a rounded line of paint (not a flat line on the paper).

    That's the closest I've found to soft pastels (at least how I like to use them), and I think it could emulate oil pastels as well, but you have to smear the paint after it is put down to get rid of the rounded effect, so that is limiting. Also, I think you'd need the right paper grain to get the "sticky" texture of oil pastels.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
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    NC, USA
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    Hi nayrb,

    Sorry for the late response, I must have overlooked this thread when you had first posted it. I've attached a preset I made and use for the Crayon tool, but there's really not much involved with it. It's basically just the default tool, with the Softness set to 80%. Getting the appearance of an oil pastel is really going to be found in the technique one uses. The Crayon tools is great when used as a smooth blender, but it requires that the canvas be set at a Roughness of 0%. This, of course, means you won't be getting the grain pick up you'll want. So here's what I like to do...
    1 - Select any canvas type you like.

    2 - Use the Fill tool to completely find in the layer with your background color.
    this step is important to the way the crayon will smear and blend on the canvas.
    3 - Begin blocking in the colors of your image.
    The grain will be causing breaks in your lines at this point. Ignore it for now.
    4 - With the colors blocked in, right click on your layer (or click on the layers menu tab), select Edit Layer Texture, and set the Roughness of your canvas down to 0% (you may need to turn off the "Use Canvas Texture" feature at the top of the panel, to do this).

    5 - (Be sure to have my Crayon Preset selected) Pick up the color in the area of the canvas you wish to start blending (Alt + Left Click is the shortcut), and then start to lightly move the cursor over the canvas. This will smear the colors together, similar to what one would get if they smeared oil pastels with ones finger.
    It might seem a bit complex the way I have it listed here, but once you understand it all, it's really only a matter of changing the canvas Roughness back and forth when you're looking to smear colors. Here's an example I just did (quick and dirty, without reference, so please don't judge it to harshly, lol. Just pay attention to the texture effects, really):

    (EDIT) - WHOOPS... Forgot the Preset, lol. Here you go: Crayon.prs

    Click image for larger version. 

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    Last edited by Someonesane; 10-28-2010 at 05:32 AM.
    Nothing is easy to the unwilling.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Sep 2010
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    dayton, OH
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    Thank you!

    I just tried your technique and it does exactly what I wanted.

    For the person who posted before someonesane, you can use the chalk tool like a soft pastel. By setting the pressure up high and using someonesane's pencil blender, you can imitate the properties of soft pastel.

    You may, however want to set the color bleed up though.

  5. #5
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    Thank you, Someonesane! And you, nayrb, for the question
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  6. Quote Originally Posted by nayrb View Post
    Thank you!

    I just tried your technique and it does exactly what I wanted.

    For the person who posted before someonesane, you can use the chalk tool like a soft pastel. By setting the pressure up high and using someonesane's pencil blender, you can imitate the properties of soft pastel.

    You may, however want to set the color bleed up though.
    For me the pencil blender just blurs a little bit rather than doing anything that looks like a real smear. I don't know how to "set the color bleed up". Do you need to have the Pro version for that? For what I like about soft pastels (texture and vivid colors), the paint tube and pallette knife are working well. I always blend soft pastels into the paper anyway, so it's fine that I have to use the pallette knife to flatten out the paint from the tube.

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    Belgium
    Posts
    159
    Thank you Someonesane for explaining your technique
    we may never forget that digital is not the same as traditional
    some people think that using a digital painting tool is the same as traditional, but it isn't
    we have to search for the right technique to have the same output as traditional
    witch the technique you explane is a perfect example

    Greetings,
    GekkouJin
    Last edited by GekkouJin; 10-30-2010 at 01:52 PM.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Apr 2007
    Location
    washington, usa
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    14,215
    here are two presets I think work well for oil pastel and soft chalk.
    put them in your felt pen presets as they are made for the felt pen.
    to me they simulate oil pastels when used together or soft pastel when
    soft pastel is used alone. hope you like. for any needed additional blending I use the flat pallet knife at 50% or 100%. These actually work best with a mouse.
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    Last edited by screenpainter; 11-17-2013 at 05:16 PM.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Mar 2010
    Location
    Belgium
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    159
    Thnx for sharing Gzairborne, these are great!
    just tested and yes, they are close.

    Keep going

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Oct 2011
    Location
    Prescott, AZ
    Posts
    210
    Thanks someonesane this works great

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