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Thread: How to mix traditonal Oil colours!

  1. #1
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    How to mix traditonal Oil colours!

    Obtain the required colours from a reputable site. Colour chart or similar.
    Bring it in as a Reference image.

    Select from it, with the picker, the colours you used to use and put a squirt of each on the canvas.
    A big pile of Titanium White is not really neccessary, but it's really nostalgic!

    Export the canvas as a .jpg.
    Bring it back in as a reference image.

    You then have a tiny inexhaustable palette of all your old colours in the top corner of the window. Plus infinitely subtle shades of them available via the colour wheel.

    The attached is a sort of French Impressionist selection.
    Attached Images Attached Images  
    Luck is infatuated with the efficient.

  2. #2
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    A wonderful tip, Aged P, thanks!

    - Gita

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    This is a really good idea. Thankyou for sharing it.

  4. #4
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    nice one 8)

  5. #5
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    Nice point Aged P. I was inspired to seek out a good color chart of pigment colors as a result of your post and came across this.

    http://www.realcolorwheel.com/colorwheel.htm

    I wonder if a study in color like this would enhance color mixing in ArtRage? One of the things I have always found a bit fishy about RGB is that if I take Blue and smear it into Yellow I don't get green like I would with pigments. Rage team can you shed light on this?
    Be well,

    "Teach, Learn, Thrive"~DM


  6. #6
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    Uhoh... caught out!

    There's a note on my whiteboard - do REAL colour mixing...

    ArtRage uses the standard digital model for blending colours - it's sort of an interpolation between the colours - sort of additive, sort of averaging. If you mix red with blue you get a lighter purple.
    In the Real World, pigments mix in a very complex manner. There is a subtractive component - where adding blue to red gives a deep dark purple. Most rich colours when you mix them end up looking like grey-brown mud. But the subtractive component varies according to the amount of thinner in the mix as well.

    So for the moment we're stuck with the standard digital colour blending model. We're definitely going to look at other models down the line. Throw away your colour-blending wheel if you're using ArtRage - we dont use that model I'm afraid.
    AndyRage's mantra for graphics engine code:
    "Sure - how hard can it be?"

  7. #7
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    Basics

    When I used the real nitty gritty pigment powders for tempera it was very apparent that chemical changes took place between some of them. Which meant often that some Blues and Yellows made Black, plus an unpleasant smell!

    Also a lot of impressionist stuff was done with "optical mixing", a whole bunch of unmixed colours on the same brush.

    I think you are taking on a task as difficult as ArtRage on it's own. but you're the only team that are likely to acheive it!

    The site that Fashmir posted seems the definitive place for colour.
    Luck is infatuated with the efficient.

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    Yeah, colour mixing is a dark art.
    I made some interesting discoveries while I was working on the marker-pen colour mixing that will help out. The 'standard model' for mixing marker pens is to use an arithmetic 'multiply'. And that's more-or-less what we were doing in ArtRage 1.x
    But I discovered something different in ArtRage 2.x marker pens which I think gives a much better colour mixing model. I'm going to use something similar when I work with the water-colours.

    AndyRage.
    AndyRage's mantra for graphics engine code:
    "Sure - how hard can it be?"

  9. #9
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    Thanks Andy for your response to this. I am excited at the possibilities in the future for more genuine color blending. I know it must be a phenominal task to accomplish, please rest assured I am a patient man. I am fascinated by the tool you have already created. I'm looking forward to your watercolors.
    Be well,

    "Teach, Learn, Thrive"~DM


  10. #10
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    Here's a quick additional tip on this topic:

    If you look in the menu on the Colour Picker, under the Custom Picker header you'll find an option to 'Create Custom Picker...'.

    If you select that, you'll get a neat little picker pane with an outline that matches the colour picker's main area. Drag that around until you see something you want to capture in the white lined area and press the tick button. That will then capture that part of your canvas as a custom picker and you can get to it from the colour picker's Custom Picker menu.

    What this means is that you can mix colours on the canvas, then sample them with that function and use them as a colour picker whenever you like. When you're working with a custom picker, the slider to the right of the main picker area turns in to a luminance slider so you can adjust the brightness of the sampled colour.

    I'll post screenshots soon.
    Matt
    ArtRage UI
    Ambient Design.

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