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Thread: Palms

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    oregon usa
    Posts
    62

    Palms

    With a nod to Alkratzer and his palette......

    Something in the composition seems not quite right to me.

    Can anyone help with this?

    Of course I am open to any other helpful critique.
    Janet
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  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jan 2010
    Location
    Easton, PA
    Posts
    937
    LOVE the colors! I also love your handling of the paint -- bold and direct with just enough blending/glazing to give a painterly feel and a sense that the piece was dashed off with quickly to capture the inspiration.

    Here's a couple of ideas to consider:

    1. Change the canvas size so you can use the rule of thirds or golden spiral to make the trio of palms position into one of the natural focal points.

    2. Add some touches of green into the Palm trio area to reinforce the focal point. They will function as the complementary to the large red area of the sand as well and complete your use of each primary and its complement.

    Nice work! (and please take any of my suggestions with a grain of salt!)
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  3. #3
    Looks wonderful.

    If I were to suggest anything, I would suggest having a second look at the shadows of the palms and how they relate to where your light source is.


    Other than that I think the painting is great.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    oregon usa
    Posts
    62

    great suggestions

    thank you both , and thanks for showing me a different composition Al.

    I think that the light comes from the left . Do the shadows not appear consistent with that or are they not consistent w/ each other?
    J

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Posts
    241
    The biggest problem was the trees touching the edge.

    It is seldom a good idea to have a subject just touch the edge, whether it's the edge of paper or something in the picture. It should either be clear of it, or cross it - touching creates an unnecessary focal point that is distracting the viewer. You've had accidentally made many of those.

    A lesser problem is that the lower half of the canvas is nearly empty. You might have meant it as a contrast to a more detailed top half, but I am not sure that was the case.

    Golden ratio, rule of three, etc. - these work, but these are just some of the rules of thumb, not laws. There are many other ways to build a composition.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    oregon usa
    Posts
    62

    thanks

    i think you are right arenhaus re: the distraction caused by the trees touching but not crossing the top. thanks for the good tip.
    janet

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Posts
    241
    I think you could describe such effects as tension points. They attract the eye. Bringing two objects together increases tension; and you want tension points only where you want the viewer's eye to linger, ideally.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Apr 2010
    Location
    California, USA
    Posts
    1

    nice

    very nicely done, in a different time I would've said the colors were too strong but on this one I love it. Real nice colors.

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    5957′NW 3019′EL
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    1,082
    Very much it is pleasant to me

    cool! super!
    choosing the words, we lose thoughts
    facebook, B, tumblr

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    Mississippi, United States
    Posts
    198
    The previous suggestions have all been excellent. One other thing you may want to consider is that all the trees trunks are exactly at the horizon line and each shadow starts at exactly the horizon line. This creates a series of 5 V's at exactly the horizon line which is distracting. Unless you are trying for some specific effect, a tree trunk that starts lower down then passes thru the horizon line and joins with the sky would pull it together rather than creating much tension at exactly the horizon line.

    One other thing, a vertical line that slopes out at the edge of a painting will tend to make that a place for the eye to leave the painting. Unless that is the place where you want the eye to naturally leave the painting, it is better to have vertical lines near the edge slope in toward the painting.

    I agree with the comment by Alkratzer ... "LOVE the colors! I also love your handling of the paint -- bold and direct with just enough blending/glazing to give a painterly feel and a sense that the piece was dashed off with quickly to capture the inspiration."...

    Carl

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