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Thread: Chalk and Crayon, and Oil Pastel

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Nov 2007
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    Red face Chalk and Crayon, and Oil Pastel

    I still think that Chalk and Crayon in ArtRage are too similar to each other. The difference is really subtle to me.

    I also think we need an Oil Pastel tool in ArtRage - like the triangle one in Painter (really popular!), like the brushes with flow jitter on in Photoshop.

    We know in ArtRage, your tablet pressure can change the size of the brush, but not really the opacity. The Inking Pen can only keep the same opacity level. The imported Sticker Pen can somehow give brushes a 'flow jitter' look, but too fake.
    ------------------------------------
    My suggestion would be that merge Chalk and Crayon in one, and have a new brush set Oil Pastel.
    Last edited by gb_whisper; 03-26-2010 at 01:36 AM.

  2. #2
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    Yeah, my friend just said Chalk and Crayon are the same in ArtRage..

  3. #3
    Join Date
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    The strokes of the two tools (chalk and crayon) do resemble each other, but it's how the strokes react with the media already on the canvas that separates them. Increasing the Crayons Softness setting will make the difference stand out more, where the colors being laid out will smear into each other (this is far more apparent when working on a canvas with a 0% Roughness setting). The chalk tends to overtake the colors that already present on the canvas, rather the moving and blending them (working more like the default soft brush from PS when working on a smooth canvas).

    Honestly, I'd be pretty upset if the Crayon tool were changed at this point. I use it in just about every single image I make and have come to rely on certain methods only it can do.
    Nothing is easy to the unwilling.

  4. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by Someonesane View Post
    The strokes of the two tools (chalk and crayon) do resemble each other, but it's how the strokes react with the media already on the canvas that separates them. Increasing the Crayons Softness setting will make the difference stand out more, where the colors being laid out will smear into each other (this is far more apparent when working on a canvas with a 0% Roughness setting). The chalk tends to overtake the colors that already present on the canvas, rather the moving and blending them (working more like the default soft brush from PS when working on a smooth canvas).

    Honestly, I'd be pretty upset if the Crayon tool were changed at this point. I use it in just about every single image I make and have come to rely on certain methods only it can do.
    I agree. I would prefer both the crayon and chalk be kept. I use both a lot, and there is definitely a difference in how they react in different situations. They are not interchangeable, imo.

  5. #5
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    Quote Originally Posted by Someonesane View Post
    The strokes of the two tools (chalk and crayon) do resemble each other, but it's how the strokes react with the media already on the canvas that separates them. Increasing the Crayons Softness setting will make the difference stand out more, where the colors being laid out will smear into each other (this is far more apparent when working on a canvas with a 0% Roughness setting). The chalk tends to overtake the colors that already present on the canvas, rather the moving and blending them (working more like the default soft brush from PS when working on a smooth canvas).

    Honestly, I'd be pretty upset if the Crayon tool were changed at this point. I use it in just about every single image I make and have come to rely on certain methods only it can do.
    Hey, thank you for the comment.
    They are different I know. However I also think a brush catagory/variety should be MORE different from the others. I have the attached picture below, painted with both crayon (left) and chalk (right), and I don't think they deserve to be two totally different tools! Merging the two can still keep them both- say just a 'wax' button will do the trick.
    My point here is to have a new tool that works totally different from the other tools, and the Oil Pastel tool is something AR lacks- a good flow jitter tool.
    Attached Images Attached Images  

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
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    Europe
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    Chalk and crayon

    I just did some playing with both chalk and crayon just to remember
    how it works, perhaps it will be possible to have different presets
    to this tools and a more flexibility but still it can be done a lot with what it is.
    Attached Images Attached Images  
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