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Thread: Glass and reflection

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Germany, Kassel
    Posts
    8

    Glass and reflection

    Hi all,

    i need some tips to enhance the technic to paint glass and other translucent materials

    thanks

    f r o s c h m a d e `10
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  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Location
    Atlanta (Georgia) area
    Posts
    968
    I'm really not the one to give tips on a project of this sort, but I must say it is an exceptionally fine effort. Post it in the gallery forum and you'll get a lot more feedback. A lot of the folks rarely look in here since the forums got so busy.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    India
    Posts
    1,560
    I agree with Doc; let us wait for the veterans to step in!
    The artist is the lover of Nature, therefore he is her slave and her master. - Rabindranth Tagore

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Posts
    241
    I am not sure what effect you were after with your glass, so I'll make conjectures... forgive me if I miss.

    There are no specific techniques in painting glass - as there are no specific techniques in painting anything else. You just combine and juxtapose colors to fool the eye.

    What makes glass glass is its 1) reflectivity and 2) refraction. On its own, it's just transparent - almost not there. To make it look interesting and look like glass, you have to give it an environment that brings its qualities out. Simple as that. It seems to me that your image merely lacks an interesting background. The flowers are good as they are; it's the featureless blue background that makes it challenging. Nothing reflects, virtually nothing refracts.

    Since changing a background is not feasible at such a late stage, you can simply enhance what you can. Make the highlights on the glass sharp and strong, the whitest points in the picture. And even without textures you still have refraction in the glass; the refraction will darken the walls and edges of your vase in specific places. Get a real vase and put it against an even backdrop. You'll see where the light does not escape it into your eye, mostly around the sides, depending on the thickness of glass. That's what you missed here.

    If you can find an angle, you might also catch a reflection of a window or something in one of the flat sides of your vase. That would give it more solidity and substance. Experiment.

    Also, you've muddled up the water edge. Water forms a meniscus where it touches the glass; it is a crisp, reflecting/refracting curved shape, nothing like the blurry gradation you made. The water might also reflect what's above it, again depending on the angle, and it will most certainly refract the stalks strongly, making them look "broken" at the surface. Again you missed that.
    Last edited by arenhaus; 01-28-2010 at 12:32 AM.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Sep 2008
    Location
    Germany, Kassel
    Posts
    8

    Thank you for your substantiated tips

    I will consider these tips and make changes in the picture

    froschmade

    ----------------------------------------------------------------------
    Quote Originally Posted by arenhaus View Post
    I am not sure what effect you were after with your glass, so I'll make conjectures... forgive me if I miss.

    There are no specific techniques in painting glass - as there are no specific techniques in painting anything else. You just combine and juxtapose colors to fool the eye.

    What makes glass glass is its 1) reflectivity and 2) refraction. On its own, it's just transparent - almost not there. To make it look interesting and look like glass, you have to give it an environment that brings its qualities out. Simple as that. It seems to me that your image merely lacks an interesting background. The flowers are good as they are; it's the featureless blue background that makes it challenging. Nothing reflects, virtually nothing refracts.

    Since changing a background is not feasible at such a late stage, you can simply enhance what you can. Make the highlights on the glass sharp and strong, the whitest points in the picture. And even without textures you still have refraction in the glass; the refraction will darken the walls and edges of your vase in specific places. Get a real vase and put it against an even backdrop. You'll see where the light does not escape it into your eye, mostly around the sides, depending on the thickness of glass. That's what you missed here.

    If you can find an angle, you might also catch a reflection of a window or something in one of the flat sides of your vase. That would give it more solidity and substance. Experiment.

    Also, you've muddled up the water edge. Water forms a meniscus where it touches the glass; it is a crisp, reflecting/refracting curved shape, nothing like the blurry gradation you made. The water might also reflect what's above it, again depending on the angle, and it will most certainly refract the stalks strongly, making them look "broken" at the surface. Again you missed that.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    oregon usa
    Posts
    62

    My attempt at glass

    F-10, I thought your glass was great! It inspired my attempt. To the person Who critiqued it: can you tell us more about how you "see" refraction? Reflection is more obvious. I agree with you on a crisp Line for water in glass but water reflection and refraction are also difficult for us novice "see-er's. can you discuss how you use very white and very dark colors in painting glass and Water?

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    oregon usa
    Posts
    62

    Post My approximation of glass

    Here's mine, also with simple back ground
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  8. #8
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Posts
    241
    You "see" refraction just like you see anything else: by looking at the patterns it makes.

    Your brain is wired to recognize glass as transparent, and saves you from registering the actual patterns of color, light and shadow. You have to look specifically for where the glass looks dark, where it is really transparent, where it reflects, and where it distorts what's behind it, to see it.

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