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Thread: Palette- TRIA Markers (Letraset)

  1. #11
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    Thanks a lot for these colours, Juz.

    They've now become my new favourite set
    .
    Hin

    Hin's Paintings: http://hinketea.imagekind.com



  2. #12
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    Thanks Hin, your works have gorgeous colour sense, can't wait to see you apply these marker colours.
    "I paint because I love to cut mats" (Arthur Alexander)

  3. #13
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    @Jus : first of all , many thanks for the palette,
    I think I became a colectionar of palettes but as I see that you are a colorist too and I think you know better than me all about colors and printing
    let me ask:
    if I mix few of the colors of this palette(or another called safe palette, there are few of them) would they give still a safe printable color ?

    I didn't understand about the PDF chart of colors your comment, why is not exact ?

    I did few personal palettes from what I thought it was Jpg very accurate colors as they was reproductions of real paints ,
    they pleased my eyes, why they wouldn't be "safe" on reproduction on paper ?

    I can see frequently reproductions of real paintings done with bold colors and the reproduction is correct ?

    For my actual understanding the color palettes are different also for what you use them:classical painting, or modern or illustration or watercolors , etc, all that need different charts, isn't it ?

    I may have other questions about colors but if you (please) help me with that I think I will may do a step in advance, wouldn't I ?!

    I am very found of my palletes which are related to what I know the best: the pigments, tints, etc. and their proprieties specific of blending , etc,
    now we are here on a different territory, still , I have my love for beautiful colors as lapis lazuli and is hard to let it fall , what do you think about that ?
    "All are about quiet and light." Dany
    Daily Studio Notes , Daniela Ionesco-Fine Art

  4. #14
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    Wow Dany51, you've asked me for an amount of information equivalent to a university course.

    A lot of what you are asking relates to the physics of light. Photons travel directly to our eye when coming from a lit source and bounce and dissipate when coming from a reflected source. When we draw with light like on a monitor or tv we have a much larger colour spectrum than when we draw with reflected light as in print or paper. A good deal of colours that can show on a monitor cannot be replicated in printers inks.Look up 'gamut of colour' to learn more about this.
    Also refer to 'additive and subtractive colour' for an idea on how colours work on a monitor v's paper. When we draw on a monitor we are using additive colour (the RGB colour model) and when we print we are using subtractive colour (the CMYK model). A good starting point for information is http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/RGB_color_model

    Some of what you are wanting to know is touched on in these threads:-
    http://www2.ambientdesign.com/forums...ad.php?t=19346
    http://www2.ambientdesign.com/forums...ad.php?t=21392

    'Colour Management' is a huge part of working with colour between monitor and print. Although this page is for photographers it has very good information about the subject http://photo.net/learn/digital-photo...tor-profiling/
    Here is a chapter from the book 'Colour Management' that is helpful in explaining Computers and Colour

    Don't get too hung up on monitor callibration though as most LCD monitors are simply not up to the job. You need a LCD monitor that has a tricolour LED backlight for decent callibration and these monitors start at around 2k US for an entry level one and go up to around 6k US for a good one.

    These are just some pointers to start with. Understanding colour in digital and print is a huge journey that you will have to undertake on your own. No forum post could ever hope to cover this subject in its entirety
    Last edited by Juz; 01-26-2010 at 04:15 PM.
    "I paint because I love to cut mats" (Arthur Alexander)

  5. #15
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    Hi Jus,

    You are very kind to give me all this references, in fact I think there are more posts on the forum about printing and colors and RGB and CMYK,
    I didn't read all about colors and there are so much documentation that I get lost in it,
    I wanted just an answer to a concrete example by hoping that I will understand better :
    I don't think that is write any were about blending "safe" color with another "safe" color and what is the result;
    all this theories are too much for me and not enough
    but probably I wasn't able to put in the good terms my questions,
    I have a very poor English language and also I am very tired,
    perhaps I wanted for once someone else to think for me but I think Is not the way to do it, never mind...
    I will wait to have an more accurate attention o all that,
    thank you for your attention ...
    can I understand that you are a university teacher !?

    All the best.
    "All are about quiet and light." Dany
    Daily Studio Notes , Daniela Ionesco-Fine Art

  6. #16
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    There are no straight forward answers with regards to colour. Ever since the first idiot caveman decided to crush up some pigment and chuck it on a wall there have been issues with colour matching.

    Generally you will be safe to mix one safe colour with another, however it is possible to travel out of gamut in the blends, especially when using supersaturated colour.
    http://www2.ambientdesign.com/forums...4&postcount=21 will show you what i mean as i've been asked this one before
    Last edited by Juz; 01-28-2010 at 06:56 PM.
    "I paint because I love to cut mats" (Arthur Alexander)

  7. #17
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    At the reflection , I think that the best for me, who works with a lot of intense colors, is to take care at the end for the files that I need to be printed , it will be a more cleaner solution.
    "All are about quiet and light." Dany
    Daily Studio Notes , Daniela Ionesco-Fine Art

  8. #18
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
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    Smile Fantastic

    Thanks so much, Juz! Very useful. Only started ArtRage yesterday and am presuming that when I blend these print-safe colours in AR they'll generate some unprintable ones but this is still a great resource to begin with.

  9. #19
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    Your quite correct Margot... Artrage does tend to err toward saturated colour the more you blend and heavily saturated colour is usually out of cmyk gamut range. Starting with print safe values will help mitigate the amount of colour out of print range but will not eliminate it completely.

    If it seems like your end result is really saturated sometimes using the adjust layer colours option (edit menu) and dialing down the saturation can help keep most colour values within print gamut.
    Last edited by Juz; 08-27-2011 at 07:56 PM.
    "I paint because I love to cut mats" (Arthur Alexander)

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