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Thread: Sketchism's Recipe for Hair, Fur, and Grass

  1. #1
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    Sketchism's Recipe for Hair, Fur, and Grass

    This is the number one question that I frequently get asked after one of my large projects. There are a million different ways to paint hair, fur and grass. This is how I do it....

    Sorry about the silly graphics on this. I did it fairly quickly and this is the first tutorial I've made.

    If I forgot something, or you have a question, feel free to ask.

    Have Fun and Thanks for Checking it out!
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    Last edited by Sketchism71; 01-15-2010 at 01:22 PM.
    "The significance is hiding in the insignificant. Appreciate everything."
    Eckhart Tolle

  2. #2
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    Sketch - this is brilliantly simple for getting such outstanding results. Terrifically well done, straight forward tutorial. This one is going to win you many friends.
    // "Appreciation fosters well-being. Be well." - Byron
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    My ArtRage Paintings Here
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  3. #3
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    You rock, Sketch! This is exactly my process as well when it comes to painting grass or foliage. It just a matter of going darkest to lightest with the hues. I generally keep in mind my light source as well to determine the amount of light hues I want to incorporate.

    This will be a very helpful guide for many! Your screen shots and text within the painting is perfection, too...of course! Do you drive people just as crazy with having to have things just so, too?

  4. #4
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    Thanks guys! I figured it was time to payback a little of what I have received so much of from this forum. It's not much but very effective!

    Absolutely right Eileen, definitely think about the light source while doing this!
    "The significance is hiding in the insignificant. Appreciate everything."
    Eckhart Tolle

  5. #5
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    Sketchism this is terrific and I learned something new. Thank you so much.
    Valerie

  6. #6
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    Thanks Valerie!

    Since I did this tutorial rather quickly, the graphics in it don't really do this technique justice. I thought I would add some more examples of this used in some of my artwork. All these are crayon on crayon as mentioned above.
    Attached Images Attached Images     
    Last edited by Sketchism71; 01-19-2010 at 04:09 PM.
    "The significance is hiding in the insignificant. Appreciate everything."
    Eckhart Tolle

  7. #7
    This is a good tutorial and you have mastered it well, but this is one area that Painter does better primarily because of having the brush creator and the many brushes. In real life I primarily use a fan brush to paint fur, hair, etc. Very light touch and lightly loaded covering a larger surface and I of course have different sizes. In painter I actually have brushes set up with a few hairs (like real life) where I can paint those hairs in quite easily.

    If I am using chalk, it would require effort such as this.

    I do lots of hair, dogs, people, and I find it invaluable to be able to use and create brushes specifically for that purpose.

    If there is a way in AR to do that I haven't found it (create several lines of hair type strands). I have tried to adjust the various settings to simulate that, but without success. I like my brushes, so I would go back and forth between both programs to suit my needs. So if AR ever does get into more brushes, it would be nice to have one that can effectively be a sort of "rake" "fan brush" "old bristle" type brushes. They create invaluable effects for intricate painting.

    I have learned from you to use the crayon for that ... I think this lesson proved what could be done beautifully with that media.
    Last edited by victorianartist; 01-19-2010 at 10:09 PM.

  8. #8
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    Sketch, your graphics examples are outstanding and your method seems simple. Are you saying that you use a blender tool to blend each and every strand of hair??

    ..if not, then how do you get around the blob that comes with every thin crayon line?

    Thanks for your input
    Attached Images Attached Images  

  9. #9
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    Thank you VictorianArtist for the comment! I've never used painter and I really haven't explored many different types of brushes. I hope this helps you achieve some desirable results!

    Ah... Rowena, I forgot to mention those little blobs that can appear. They are caused from the beginning of the stroke when the pen first touches the tablet. Two ways to reduce them.

    1. First, lightly place the pen on the tablet, if a blob appears (without picking up the pen) lightly rub it out. It will blend away.

    2. While I am painting the strands of hair, I do it very lightly and try to minimize the amount that I lift the pen of the tablet. If I want more pressure for more color I do it after the stroke is started. This sounds complicated but it is really easy once you get the feel of it. I don't use any blending tools (blend only with the crayon). Try the crayon at different pressures to see if that helps as well. I think the key with this effect is learning how much "hand/pen" pressure to use. Like I said, I use very light hand/pen pressure and for deeper color I apply more pressure once the pen is already on the tablet and the stroke is started.

    Let me know if this helps. Thank you for the feedback!
    "The significance is hiding in the insignificant. Appreciate everything."
    Eckhart Tolle

  10. #10
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    Sep 2006
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    San Diego, CA USA
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    Wow, and Thanks!

    Sketchism, your finished work is simply breathtaking!

    It's astonishing to think that this is your method,just because it sounds so simple. Obviously it's a lot of work, and the quintessential "detail work," but what results!

    I will have to get busy practicing this! Thank you for sharing this!
    bbbOK

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