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Thread: Drawing from imagination

  1. #1
    Join Date
    May 2006
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    West Yorkshire, England
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    Drawing from imagination

    Who finds it hard creating images from the imagination? I do, I just sit and stare at a blank screen of paper for hours lol. I can't seem to work unless I have some reference image in-front of me, I would love to able to create something like you cool guys on here. I have done a couple of works (checkout my blog at the bottom) but they are very few and far between.
    :?
    You can view all my other artwork here http://spookyjules.blogspot.co.uk/

  2. #2
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    Oh, I do. Nearly impossible, actually. :\

  3. #3
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    Mar 2006
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    hmmm no i don't
    in some times maybe....there's still nothing! But then i draw only abit around and i nearly every chase there are some shapes and colors wich gives me an idea...give it a try!

    greez
    M.Siegrist

    Artrage 2.6 & Wacom Intuos 3 A5
    XP SP2

  4. #4
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    Sometimes I just sit an doodle and something forms, but more often than not I discard the picture.
    You can view all my other artwork here http://spookyjules.blogspot.co.uk/

  5. #5
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    I almost never use a reference image or a tracing.
    Grains I use quite a lot, until we get some different brushes! :lol:

    If it doesn't exist up in, what's left of, my brain it doesn't get painted.
    I sometimes get inspiration from another picture or event, but I seldom use stuff that isn't already pretty clear in my mind.

    Blank paper , real or virtual, doesn't last long in front of me, there's always something to create on it, even if it gets scrapped eventually. It's all practice.

    Phil
    Luck is infatuated with the efficient.

  6. #6
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    Mar 2006
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    well i usually imagine myself being that specfic creature i want, this way i can imagine my moves and i can be able to translate them into paper, but on specific type of imagination or concept of a creature person etc, it depepnds on what i need, like robots, i have lots of mental images crossing my mind as i say it, as well as biological creatures, but when it comes on creating a human female body i need a reference!

    yeah just felt like sharing that

    cheers!

  7. #7
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    May 2006
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    yeh Aged P thats great, wish I could. I wanted to be an illustrator when I grew up lol, but unfortunatley inspiration doesnt come to me quickly, I am good at rendering an image but lack creativity, that let me down at art college.

    sbug51 I know what you mean about reference images for the human body, although some people can draw figures without references, im not one of them.
    You can view all my other artwork here http://spookyjules.blogspot.co.uk/

  8. #8
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    ok a random thought, who can draw a horse from memory :shock: :lol:
    Attached Images Attached Images  
    You can view all my other artwork here http://spookyjules.blogspot.co.uk/

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Jul 2006
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    22,542
    People who are good at realistic styles out of their head have been doing similar things for a while. At some early point in getting to where they could do it out of their head, they had visual reference to learn the structure and surface. And they did it a lot thereafter. I'll reference Waheed, who is amazing. But he's practiced.

    In studios, when styles would change as for a different show style, it was rare that these seasoned professionals had it down right off the bat, and never all of them. There was a bit of a learning curve.

    Either one is very gifted with a photographic memory, or has to go through the steps to hit and maintain a plateau upon which they can build.

    I've found that it slows progress to bounce around before re-enforcing what you just tried for the first time. That's a choice. Some people like to bounce. But there often is a price to pay if at some point you don't stay with something long enough to get good at it.

    Believe me, if you drew horses a lot, you would be able to do them out of your head. And the people who say they're no good at drawing horses have avoided doing them and perhaps even set up a mental block.

    Develop enough mental blocks and you'll find yourself walled in.

    My suggestion, if you have the luxury, is to do stuff you love. That way you will be more likely to keep doing it and create a solid foundation for any new thing you try thereafter.

    Then when you wanted to do a horse standing, you could. And roll that over to do perhaps a horse cantering. Then a horse running, then jumping. And then, if in your creativity, you wanted to do a horse in a field, or a desert or floating in the sky, you could do it.

    Imagination gets liberated when you no longer have to worry about the exact photo reference. And the paintings will be more satisfying if they look decent. And then you would want to do it more. etc. . .

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Mar 2006
    Location
    USA
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    211
    Yes and no, sometimes i can look at anything and transform it in my mind. I think my childhood never left me. :roll:

    I think when i have a headace or i am sick i tend to do better at directly drawing from my head.

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