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Thread: Armageddon Hour cover

  1. #1
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    Armageddon Hour cover

    Hi, this is the (unfinished) cover illustration for my boardgame "Armageddon Hour" to be published soon. All done in AR3 Studio Pro working at 300 dpi on 30% larger than print scale.

    Still some tweaks to be done here and there.

    I teach part-time in an art academy and I'll be recommending the school to purchase AR (I have already demoed the software in one of my lessons).

    Any commenst appreciated. thanks
    Andrea (a guy from Italy)
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  2. #2
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    Wonderful. Outstanding work.

    Since you're working at 300dpi 30% larger that print scale, I'm curious what are your print dimensions. AR at 300dpi can put a strain on a lot of systems as the print dimensions increase. I would be interested in your experience.
    // "Appreciation fosters well-being. Be well." - Byron
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    My ArtRage Paintings Here
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    64 bit Win8Pro, 16GB Ram, Intel i7 Quad Core - 8 threads; Wacom Intuios 4

  3. #3
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    Very Cool! The white gorilla is super!
    I think that will be very nice to share the way of how you begin the illustration and the general steps until the final. Tools used and sizes, what tablet you use..
    The skecht is draw on paper and scanned or drawed directly into AR3?

    Salut,
    Josep

  4. #4
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    I am printing this on A4 size so it's 210 x 297mm at 300 dpi. It's a 300 mb file.
    My PC is quite powerful (4 gb RAM and dedicated graphics card, dual processor) and yes this size is quite taxing for AR 3 -- expect long waits especially when moving layers or when toggling layer visibility on/off (an operation I do continuously).

    The painting took about 2 full days start to finish. It was entirely done on a computer, no scanning at all. I used the photo of a yawning gorilla as a ref for the albino ape. I work with a Wacom Cintiq 18SX.

    I just did a pencil sketch in AR using the pencil tool, then painted over it layer by layer with oils and abit of crayons (to give texture) and a bit of airbrush (to soften and to give tint). The rust effects on the metal background and the ichor on the hero's axe were done with sticker spray. The hair of the ape was mostly done by hand with oil brushes and then just a bit of the (fun to use) hair sticker sprays.

  5. #5
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    This is my initial sketch (done in artrage with the pencil tool).
    I also enlarged the canvas after this because I felt more background should show.
    Andrea
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  6. #6
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    Since this is a post holocaust game, the green is also there to suggest radiations. the hero is trying to prevent a mutant boss from detonating a "mutebomb" that will kill humans and give more powers to the mutants...

    I also use Inkscape and SAI (SAI is my preferred tool for comic-strip illustration because the ink pen tool is vector based, a function that I miss in AR3).

    I would link to my sites to show you my art but the antispam function on the forum is not letting me put links here until I post some more messages...

  7. #7
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    Matt
    actually I knew already that, but my other sites contain hundreds of works (I've been doing this for many years). Anyway, I imagine at some point the forum will let me post my links...

  8. #8
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    By the way, to see other work I did before you can check my games there (I painted all covers, generally in Photoshop 5 on a scanned pencil art): www.lulu.com/songofblades

    all the covers you see there were painted, generally, in one day each. The cover for the Napoleonic game is simply a clip art picture that I colorized.

    For my non-digital (traditional media), you can see my watercolors on www.yessy.com/umbra (warning: nudity).

    --
    my games:
    http://ganeshagames.blogspot.com

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    my fine art: www.yessy.com/umbra

  9. #9
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    I'm afraid it looks cluttered. You have it almost even brightness and even level of detail, so the lights are not distinct from the shadows and the foreground is not distinct from the background.

    You can save it by darkening the shadows, making a clear distinction in brightness between shadow, midtone, and light, and focusing on the foreground instead of the background. Don't forget that if your primary light is green, it will make the shadows look reddish.

    There are also numerous lighting mistakes, but given that the overall tone needs reworking, I won't dwell on those. Keep the direction of the light and the form in mind, then the falling shadows will be clear to you. If you have trouble with that, use the plane method to define the form, as annotated by Loomis in "Figure Drawing for All It's Worth", available from fineart.sk.

    As an aid, desaturate your drawing so it is black and white. Without color, it is much easier to design the proper balance of light and shadow. You can even paint a black-and-white sketch first, and add color later, but I don't recommend it because you can fall into the "compartmentalized grisaille" trap that way. It's better to temporarily desaturate the drawing to see where you are heading, and keep the light and shadow colored.

  10. #10
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    Thanks for the suggestions. I have to work a bit on the background to tone it down, and I'll be giving another red tint to the shadows (I already did but it doesn't show a lot, I worked on the principle cool light= warm shadows). This game goes on sale in January so I hope I'll find the time to do all the changes you suggested
    I'll probably add a small red rim light coming from the left of the screen.
    Andrea

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