ArtRage 5 Product PageArtRage Lite Product PageArtRage for iPad Product PageArtRage for Android Product PageArtRage  Android Oil Painter Free Product PageArtRage  Free Demos Page

Results 1 to 7 of 7

Thread: Matching print colour to on screen

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    Milky Way
    Gallery
    View images
    Posts
    858

    Matching print colour to on screen

    Another subject that I value your collective wisdom on...

    So far I have printed out
    4 digital paintings onto box canvas and
    10 or more onto card (by commercial printer)

    The results have been mixed
    Generally colours tend toward over saturated and or too dark compared to on screen (Asus F3SE)

    How many pre production test prints are you averaging before you get the desired results?

    Have you stumbled on any shortcuts or good practice tips?

    Are there any software programs that work successfully in this area?

    Open to any suggestions or pointers
    Thanks for replies (None would be too long )

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    Milky Way
    Gallery
    View images
    Posts
    858

    Afterthought

    Also, have you found that the right choice of monitor has made a difference?

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    Auckland, NZ
    Gallery
    View images
    Posts
    428
    Adjusting monitors is a huge issue, yes and very important.

    Also, be aware that artrage uses RGB colour format, and printers use CMYK - which isn't able to print all colours.

    need to go have dinner.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Sep 2009
    Location
    Milky Way
    Gallery
    View images
    Posts
    858
    You must be the same timezone, Lol

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Gallery
    View images
    Posts
    241
    What you want is called ICM, color matching. Look up "monitor calibration" and "printer calibration". The issue is more often due to the monitor.

    In the simplest case, download an applet called Adobe Gamma and run it in wizard mode. It will drive you through the calibration process.

    Also, you can check your monitor's manufacturer's web site for the ICM profile they provide, and use it. (Such profiles are applied in the advanced display settings control applet, if you run Windows.)

    In the really advanced case, there are special colorimeter devices you can buy and use to calibrate the monitor.


    Flynn: modern print shops have no problem handling RGB color. In fact, small-run digital printing machines tend to work better with RGB originals.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Oct 2008
    Location
    Auckland, NZ
    Gallery
    View images
    Posts
    428
    Quote Originally Posted by arenhaus View Post


    Flynn: modern print shops have no problem handling RGB color. In fact, small-run digital printing machines tend to work better with RGB originals.
    Sorry, fell prey to 'rush off to dinner'

    Yes, they handle RGB files, but the *inks* are usually CYMK. the big, fancy art printing places will have extra ink colours, but most printers don't due to the cost. It doesn't always matter, but I have a couple of pictures I simply cannot print locally (e.g. this one http://www2.ambientdesign.com/galler...imageuser=6288 - the blues are outside the CYMK range)

    (...or CMYK? I get confused )

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Nov 2009
    Location
    Fort Collins, CO
    Gallery
    View images
    Posts
    21
    As suggested above, calibrate your monitor. I could never get the software only solutions to work. The hardware monitor calibration is the most reliable. I use the Pantone Huey, but the Spyder is probably the industry standard. Now when I send things out for printing (mostly photos), they come back with no surprises. Rich

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •